46

I'm trying to write syntactic sugar, in a monad-style, over std::optional. Please consider:

template<class T>
void f(std::optional<T>)
{}

As is, this function cannot be called with a non-optional T1 (e.g. an int), even though there exists a conversion from T to std::optional<T>2.

Is there a way to make f accept an std::optional<T> or a T (converted to an optional at the caller site), without defining an overload3?


1) f(0): error: no matching function for call to 'f(int)' and note: template argument deduction/substitution failed, (demo).
2) Because template argument deduction doesn't consider conversions.
3) Overloading is an acceptable solution for a unary function, but starts to be an annoyance when you have binary functions like operator+(optional, optional), and is a pain for ternary, 4-ary, etc. functions.

  • 12
    have it take a T and then just check if it's an optional and if it's not, make it one. constexpr if can do that super easy if you're using c++17. – xaxxon Aug 21 '18 at 9:00
  • 8
    @xaxxon that's worth an answer – YSC Aug 21 '18 at 9:01
  • 3
    Can you clarify what you mean by “in a monad-style”? Because as it stands your question suggests you are interested in some kind of automatic conversion or overload, and both answers do something along these lines. But this has nothing whatsoever to do with monads. – Konrad Rudolph Aug 21 '18 at 10:43
  • @KonradRudolph The mention of monads was just to give a context. I want, provided F=λxy., an optional(x) and an optional(y), return an optional(F(xy)). For such a definition to be useful and let its user chain expressions, it needs to accept both optionals and scalars. – YSC Aug 21 '18 at 11:39
  • The problem with this definition is that, unlike a monad, it does not compose. How would your function handle a std::optional<std::optional<T>>? Whereas if you had a monad lifting operator you would simply lift(F) and wouldn’t have this problem. – Konrad Rudolph Aug 21 '18 at 12:49
37

Another version. This one doesn't involve anything:

template <typename T>
void f(T&& t) {
    std::optional opt = std::forward<T>(t);
}

Class template argument deduction already does the right thing here. If t is an optional, the copy deduction candidate will be preferred and we get the same type back. Otherwise, we wrap it.

  • 2
    Even though this is not code golf, I've got the feeling this answer deserve the checkmark :D – YSC Aug 21 '18 at 13:15
  • 1
    Good line of thinking; however, doesn't opt need to be defined as std::optional<T> here? – LThode Aug 21 '18 at 15:34
  • 7
    @LThode Very much no. – Barry Aug 21 '18 at 15:37
  • 3
    @Barry -- a-ha, I see what you mean now -- I've never bumped into class template argument deduction before! – LThode Aug 21 '18 at 15:40
  • 1
    This lacks overload resolution features; is there a way to test if std::optional opt = std::forward<T>(t) would compile? – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Aug 21 '18 at 17:42
15

Instead of taking optional as argument take deductible template parameter:

template<class T>
struct is_optional : std::false_type{};

template<class T>
struct is_optional<std::optional<T>> : std::true_type{};

template<class T, class = std::enable_if_t<is_optional<std::decay_t<T>>::value>>
constexpr decltype(auto) to_optional(T &&val){
    return std::forward<T>(val);
}

template<class T, class = std::enable_if_t<!is_optional<std::decay_t<T>>::value>>
constexpr std::optional<std::decay_t<T>> to_optional(T &&val){
    return { std::forward<T>(val) };
}

template<class T>
void f(T &&t){
    auto opt = to_optional(std::forward<T>(t));
}

int main() {
    f(1);
    f(std::optional<int>(1));
}

Live example

13

This uses one of my favorite type traits, which can check any all-type template against a type to see if it's the template for it.

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <optional>


template<template<class...> class tmpl, typename T>
struct x_is_template_for : public std::false_type {};

template<template<class...> class tmpl, class... Args>
struct x_is_template_for<tmpl, tmpl<Args...>> : public std::true_type {};

template<template<class...> class tmpl, typename... Ts>
using is_template_for = std::conjunction<x_is_template_for<tmpl, std::decay_t<Ts>>...>;

template<template<class...> class tmpl, typename... Ts>
constexpr bool is_template_for_v = is_template_for<tmpl, Ts...>::value;


template <typename T>
void f(T && t) {
    auto optional_t = [&]{
        if constexpr (is_template_for_v<std::optional, T>) {
            return t; 
        } else {
            return std::optional<std::remove_reference_t<T>>(std::forward<T>(t));
        }
    }();
    (void)optional_t;
}

int main() {
    int i = 5;
    std::optional<int> oi{5};

    f(i);
    f(oi);
}

https://godbolt.org/z/HXgoEE

  • Really nice trait you've got here. Do you know why std::decay is necessary? – YSC Aug 21 '18 at 9:22
  • 2
    @YSC Without std::decay it would not work automagically with types like std::optional<int> & and related ones – bartop Aug 21 '18 at 9:31
5

Another version. This one doesn't involve writing traits:

template <typename T>
struct make_optional_t {
    template <typename U>
    auto operator()(U&& u) const {
        return std::optional<T>(std::forward<U>(u));
    }
};

template <typename T>
struct make_optional_t<std::optional<T>> {
    template <typename U>
    auto operator()(U&& u) const {
        return std::forward<U>(u);
    }
};

template <typename T>
inline make_optional_t<std::decay_t<T>> make_optional;

template <typename T>
void f(T&& t){
    auto opt = make_optional<T>(std::forward<T>(t));
}

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