5

I would like to make it clear once and for all.

I'm pretty sure I know when to use self::MY_CONST and SomeClass::MY_CONST but it's unclear when to use static::MY_CONST.

You use self::MY_CONST…

…when you refer to a constant that is defined in the same class where you call it.

Example:

class Foo 
{
    const MY_CONST = 123;

    public function example() 
    {
        echo self::MY_CONST;
    }
}

You use AnotherClass::MY_CONST…

…when you refer to a constant that is defined in different class that the one from where you call it.

Example:

class Bar
{
    const MY_CONST = 123;
}

class Foo 
{
    public function example() 
    {
        echo Bar::MY_CONST;
    }
}

You use static::MY_CONST…

…when? I don't know. In terms of referring constants using static makes no sense to me. Please provide a valid reason or confirm that self:: and SomeClass:: examples are sufficient.

edit: My question is not a duplicate. I don't ask about $this at all. Don't mark this as a duplicate.

3

The static keyword is needed for something called "Late Static Binding" (see also What exactly are late static bindings in PHP?). The manual page on that topic is not the clearest, but this sentence is key:

"Late binding" comes from the fact that static:: will not be resolved using the class where the method is defined but it will rather be computed using runtime information.

Effectively, static:: is similar to $this, in that it resolves to the class where the code is running, which might be a sub-class of the class where the code is written.

Let's use your example of self::, and add a sub-class:

class Foo 
{
    const MY_CONST = 123;

    public function example() 
    {
        echo self::MY_CONST;
    }
}

class Bar extends Foo
{
    const MY_CONST = 456;
}

$bar = new Bar;
$bar->example();

This will output 123, because the self:: in the definition always refers to Foo, regardless of how you call it.

However, if we change to use late static binding:

class Foo 
{
    const MY_CONST = 123;

    public function example() 
    {
        echo static::MY_CONST;
    }
}

class Bar extends Foo
{
    const MY_CONST = 456;
}

$bar = new Bar;
$bar->example();

Now it will echo 456, because the static:: resolves to the class we were actually using at runtime when we made the call, which was Bar, and Bar::MY_CONST has a different value.

  • Wow, it's clearer now. So basically it looks like using static is a way to go when you have inheritance, but when you operate only within a single class, the self is sufficient, right? – Matt Komarnicki Aug 21 '18 at 10:30
0

This example will show you all the difference:

<?php

class A
{
    const TEST = 'A';

    static function echoSelf()
    {
        echo self::TEST . PHP_EOL;
    }

    static function echoStatic()
    {
        echo static::TEST . PHP_EOL;
    }
}

class B extends A
{
    const TEST = 'B';
}

echo 'Using self:' .PHP_EOL;
A::echoSelf(); // A
B::echoSelf(); // A

echo 'Using static:' .PHP_EOL;
A::echoStatic(); // A
B::echoStatic(); // B

Enjoy ;)

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