12

I have read this document about react-router Switch

I understand the definition about Switch and Route

But still couldn't understand some points

If I want to pick only one Route to render we use Switch like this

<Switch>
  <Route exact path="/" component={Home} />
  <Route path="/a" component={A} />
  <Route path="/b" component={B} />
</Switch>

The point I can't understand is I can get same effect without Switch

 <Route exact path="/" component={Home} />
 <Route path="/a" component={A} />
 <Route path="/b" component={B} />

So why do we use Switch ? When do we need to use Switch?


I found a situation that need to use Switch

If I want to render a specific component when no path match

we need to wrap Route in Switch like this

<Switch>
  <Route exact path="/" component={Home} />
  <Route path="/a" component={A} />
  <Route path="/b" component={B} />
  <Route component={SpecificComponent} />
</Switch>

Am I right ?

4 Answers 4

12

Although in your case you can get the same effect using exact but it may not always be the case. However in cases where one of your Route contains nested route, if you have exact Route at the top level, you cannot make use of the nested Routes.

Switch in the above case serves the purpose since it renders the first match only

For example,

Say Home route contains nested Routes like

const Home = (props) => (
     <div>
          <Route path="/dashboard" component={Dashboard}/>
          <Route path="/layout" component={Layout}/>
     </div>
)

So now if you write

<Route exact path="/" component={Home} />

and when you visit /dashboard. That Dashboard component cannot be rendered since no Route matches with /dashboard at the top level.

In order to make the example run correctly, you can make use of Switch and reorder the routes so that the paths that are prefixes to other paths are at the end

<Switch>
  <Route path="/a" component={A} />
  <Route path="/b" component={B} />
  <Route path="/" component={Home} />
</Switch>
7
  • 1
    Thanks for your answer. But I still can't understand your example, so if we want to make the example work correctly, we need to wrap Route in Switch ?
    – Anymore
    Aug 22, 2018 at 7:38
  • I found a situation that need to use switch. I update in my question, am I correct?
    – Anymore
    Aug 22, 2018 at 9:36
  • @Anymore, yes that is another situation you would use switch, when you want to render a default route when nothing matches Aug 22, 2018 at 9:37
  • My answer specifies a situation when you need to write nested Routes Aug 22, 2018 at 9:37
  • thank you!. I want to know how to make your example run correctly, can you explain it ?
    – Anymore
    Aug 22, 2018 at 9:56
3

Let me put out the distinct features of Route, exact and Switch:

  • Route does the partial matching. Route's path matches inclusively (matching many).

  • exact removes partial matching. It might match more than one routes, in case we are using wild cards in the routes.

  • Switch renders only the route that first matches. Switch path matches exclusively (matching only one).

To explain in detail, I want to illustrate how the route matching works with and without exact. Let's suppose we have the below code and we are not using exact.

how-route-matches-without-exact

So, if we visit /pagetwo URL, Route will do the partial matching and will render both the routes. Let's see how it happens. In the below illustration, we are looking at the address bar and the path we are navigating to (extracted path) and what route(s) is(are) getting matched. So, Route will render a route when extractedPath.contains(path-in-our-Route-declaration) evaluates to be true.

how-path-gets-matched-1

how-path-gets-matched-2

Hope that clarifies how Route works behind the scene. To avoid this partial matching, we use exact. The use of exact resolves the problem until we encounter some special cases. Suppose we have two routes like:

  • /users/create
  • /users/* (wildcard in the route).

In the above case, the exact will match both the routes. So, to resolve such issues, we can use Switch. It renders only one route and whatever route is matched first. So, here the order in which you are defining your routes matters.

1

Basically, and the "exact" keyword both serve the same purpose. (NOTE: the matching algorithm that uses checks to see if the current URL start with this path. ) But while we use , the order of Route declaration or Specificity matters. The more specific Route needs to be added at the top. In your case

<Switch>
<Route path="/a" component={A} />
<Route path="/b" component={B} />
<Route exact path="/" component={Home} />
</Switch>

In the case of "exact", when you pass "exact", this route will match only if the path is exactly matched. In your case, home path is set to exact.

<Route exact path="/" component={Home} />
<Route path="/a" component={A} />
<Route path="/b" component={B} />
0

React-router-dom version 5.2.0 used below. The below explanation doesn't hold good for react-router-verion 6. Please refer to Academind video attached below for breaking changes

You're right! If we want to render a specific component when no match found we use switch, but let me explain why.

Let's consider an example and understand the role of exact and Switch

function App() {

  return <Router>
   
    <Route path="/">
      <Home />     {/* This displays Home Page */}
    </Route>

    <Route path="/about">
      <About />    {/* This displays About Page */}
    </Route>

  </Router>

}

The path /about matches both home page (/) and about page (/about) as /about is equal to / which is home + about. In other words, /about has / and about (home and about), so it renders both.

enter image description here

To avoid rendering both the components we use exact on the first occuring component (/ in this case) so that the matching of that common component stops right there (home / is the common component in this case as it is present in both / and /about).

Meaning,

/
/about

The common in these two routes is / . To stop the match of / at about page, we put a limitation called exact prop on / so that it stops matching at / and doesn't continue to check other routes.

In further routes which has /, the home will not be rendered as we have already added exact limitation on / (home)

<Route exact path="/">
  <Home />     {/* displays home. Stops matching / for further routes below because of exact prop */}
</Route>

enter image description here

To add to this example, let's now add a dynamic route to /about

 {/* This displays About Page */}
    <Route path="/about">
      <About />
    </Route>

    {/* This displays About Sub Page */}
    <Route path="/about/:id">
      <AboutSubPage />
    </Route>

At this point, again both /about and /about/:id (id can be anything after /about/) will be rendered to screen as shown below as there's no exact prop on /about.

enter image description here

Let's add exact prop to /about page now so that /about/2 renders only About sub page and not About page

<Route exact path="/about">
  <About />
</Route>

<Route path="/about/:id">
  <AboutSubPage />
</Route>

This now displays only AboutSubPage for /about/2 as shown below

enter image description here

So far so good, but now the main question is where and why we need Switch here?

Let's say, in our current app, if someone navigates to a page that doesn't exist. For example, /hello doesn't exist. Then we get a blank screen which is not a good user experience. It would be nice if we display a friendly message saying "sorry the page is not available". But what should be the URL matcher here? We can say * (meaning any text).

<Route path="*">
  <h1>sorry the page is not available </h1>
</Route>

This now leads to an unwanted behavior where this * matches every route (even the routes mentioned above). The exact prop added in the above routes would not stop this because, by adding *, we are saying "match each and every route and display the h1".

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

Now, in order to solve this issue where * route (added at last) should be considered only if none of the above matches, we use Switch.

By using Switch we are saying react-router that, "If one of the routes match then please stop and don't continue to render other routes below". This way, when it encounters / or /about, it just stops and doesn't render the last route that matches *.

In case if it doesn't find any route, like in /hello, then it continues to find until it matches * and there by renders our message to screen.

Full Code

function App() {

  return <Router>

    <Switch> {* stops at first route it finds, so that error message at last is not displayed in each and every route *}

      {/* This displays Home Page */}

      <Route exact path="/">
        <Home />
      </Route>

      {/* This displays About Page */}

      <Route exact path="/about">
        <About />
      </Route>

      {/* This displays About Page */}

      <Route path="/about/:id">
        <AboutSubPage />
      </Route>

      <Route path="*">
        <h1>sorry the page is not available </h1>
      </Route>

    </Switch>

  </Router>

}

Update We have react-router version 6 now. With this, we don't have Switch and exact anymore

Resource to learn the breaking changes - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zEQiNFAwDGo&ab_channel=Academind

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