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I've made a c/c++ program (mix of printf and std::) to get an idea of different cache performance. I would like to parallelize a process that's calculating over a big chunk of memory. I have to do several calculations on the same memory locations, so I've write the results on place, overwriting source data. When the first calculus is done, I do another one with previous results.

I've guessed if I have two threads, one making the first calculus, and the other the second, I would improve performance because each thread does half the work, thus making the process twice as fast. I've read how caches work, so I know if this isn't done well, it may be even worse, so I've write a small program to measure everything.

(See below for machine topology, CPU type and flags and source code.)

I've seen some strange results. Apparently, there is no difference in taking data from L1, L2, L3 or RAM in order to do the calculations. I doesn't matter if I'm working in the same buffer or two different buffers (with distance in memory between them) unless they are in the same core. I mean: the worst results are when the two threads are in the same core (hyper-threading). I set them with CPU affinity

There are some options for my program, but they are self explanatory.

These are the commands and the results:

./main --loops 200 --same-buffer --flush

200000 loops.
Flushing caches.
Cache size: 32768
Using same buffer.
Running in cores 0 and 1.
Waiting 2 seconds just for threads to be ready.
Post threads to begin work 200000 iterations.
Thread two created, pausing.
Go ahead and calculate in 2...
Buffer address: 0x7f087c156010.
Waiting for thread semaphores.
Thread one created, pausing.
Go ahead and calculate in 1...
Buffer address: 0x7f087c156010.
Time 1 18.436685
Time 2 18.620263
We don't wait anymore.
Joining threads.
Dumping data.
Exiting from main thread.

We can see it is running in cores 0 and 1, according to my topology, different cores. The buffer address is the same: 0x7f087c156010.

The time: 18secs.

Now in the same core:

./main --loops 200 --same-buffer --same-core --flush

200000 loops.
Flushing caches.
Cache size: 32768
Using same buffer.
Using same core. (HyperThreading)
Thread one created, pausing.
Thread two created, pausing.
Running in cores 0 and 6.
Waiting 2 seconds just for threads to be ready.
Post threads to begin work 200000 iterations.
Waiting for thread semaphores.
Go ahead and calculate in 1...
Buffer address: 0x7f0a6bbe1010.
Go ahead and calculate in 2...
Buffer address: 0x7f0a6bbe1010.
Time 1 26.572419
Time 2 26.951195
We don't wait anymore.
Joining threads.
Dumping data.
Exiting from main thread.

We can see it is running in cores 0 and 6, according to my topology, same core, two hyper-threads. Same buffer.

The time: 26secs.

So 10 seconds slower.

How's that possible? I've understood if the cache line isn't dirty, it wouldn't be fetched from memory (either, L1, 2, 3 or RAM). I've made the program writing alternative 64 byte arrays, so same as one cache line. If one thread writes cache line 0, the other writes cache line 1, so there is no cache line clash.

Does this means two hyper-threads, even if they share the L1 cache, can't write to it at the same time?

Apparently, working in two distinct cores does better than one alone.

-- Edit --

As suggested by commenters and Max Langhof, I've included code to align buffers. I've also added an option to misalign the buffers only to see the difference.

I'm not sure about the align and misaling code, but I've copied from here

Just like they told me, it's a waste of time to measure non optimized code.

And for optimized code the results are pretty interesting. What I found surprising is that it takes the same time, even misaligning data and with two cores, but I suppose that's because the small amount of work in the inner loop. (And I guess that shows how well designed are today processors.)

Numbers (taken with perf stat -d -d -d):

*** Same core

No optimization
---------------
No aligment
    39.866.074.445      L1-dcache-loads           # 1485,716 M/sec                    (21,75%)
        10.746.914      L1-dcache-load-misses     #    0,03% of all L1-dcache hits    (20,84%)
Aligment
    39.685.928.674      L1-dcache-loads           # 1470,627 M/sec                    (22,77%)
        11.003.261      L1-dcache-load-misses     #    0,03% of all L1-dcache hits    (27,37%)
Misaligment
    39.702.205.508      L1-dcache-loads           # 1474,958 M/sec                    (24,08%)
        10.740.380      L1-dcache-load-misses     #    0,03% of all L1-dcache hits    (29,05%)


Optimization
------------
No aligment
    39.702.205.508      L1-dcache-loads           # 1474,958 M/sec                    (24,08%)
        10.740.380      L1-dcache-load-misses     #    0,03% of all L1-dcache hits    (29,05%)
       2,390298203 seconds time elapsed
Aligment
        19.450.626      L1-dcache-loads           #   25,108 M/sec                    (23,21%)
         1.758.012      L1-dcache-load-misses     #    9,04% of all L1-dcache hits    (22,95%)
       2,400644369 seconds time elapsed
Misaligment
         2.687.025      L1-dcache-loads           #    2,876 M/sec                    (24,64%)
           968.413      L1-dcache-load-misses     #   36,04% of all L1-dcache hits    (12,98%)
       2,483825841 seconds time elapsed

*** Two cores

No optimization
---------------
No aligment
    39.714.584.586      L1-dcache-loads           # 2156,408 M/sec                    (31,17%)
       206.030.164      L1-dcache-load-misses     #    0,52% of all L1-dcache hits    (12,55%)
Aligment
    39.698.566.036      L1-dcache-loads           # 2129,672 M/sec                    (31,10%)
       209.659.618      L1-dcache-load-misses     #    0,53% of all L1-dcache hits    (12,54%)
Misaligment
         2.687.025      L1-dcache-loads           #    2,876 M/sec                    (24,64%)
           968.413      L1-dcache-load-misses     #   36,04% of all L1-dcache hits    (12,98%)


Optimization
------------
No aligment
        16.711.148      L1-dcache-loads           #    9,431 M/sec                    (31,08%)
       202.059.646      L1-dcache-load-misses     # 1209,13% of all L1-dcache hits    (12,87%)
       2,898511757 seconds time elapsed
Aligment
        18.476.510      L1-dcache-loads           #   10,484 M/sec                    (30,99%)
       202.180.021      L1-dcache-load-misses     # 1094,25% of all L1-dcache hits    (12,83%)
       2,894591875 seconds time elapsed
Misaligment
        18.663.711      L1-dcache-loads           #   11,041 M/sec                    (31,28%)
       190.887.434      L1-dcache-load-misses     # 1022,77% of all L1-dcache hits    (13,22%)
       2,861316941 seconds time elapsed

-- End edit --

The program creates log files with buffer dumps, so I've verified it works as expected (you can see below).

Also I have the ASM where we can see the loop is doing something.

 269:main.cc       ****             for (int x = 0; x < 64; ++x)
 1152                   .loc 1 269 0 is_stmt 1
 1153 0c0c C745F000         movl    $0, -16(%rbp)   #, x
 1153      000000
 1154               .L56:
 1155                   .loc 1 269 0 is_stmt 0 discriminator 3
 1156 0c13 837DF03F         cmpl    $63, -16(%rbp)  #, x
 1157 0c17 7F26             jg  .L55    #,
 270:main.cc       ****                 th->cache->cache[i].data[x] = '2';
 1158                   .loc 1 270 0 is_stmt 1 discriminator 2
 1159 0c19 488B45E8         movq    -24(%rbp), %rax # th, tmp104
 1160 0c1d 488B4830         movq    48(%rax), %rcx  # th_9->cache, _25
 1161 0c21 8B45F0           movl    -16(%rbp), %eax # x, tmp106
 1162 0c24 4863D0           movslq  %eax, %rdx  # tmp106, tmp105
 1163 0c27 8B45F4           movl    -12(%rbp), %eax # i, tmp108
 1164 0c2a 4898             cltq
 1165 0c2c 48C1E006         salq    $6, %rax    #, tmp109
 1166 0c30 4801C8           addq    %rcx, %rax  # _25, tmp109
 1167 0c33 4801D0           addq    %rdx, %rax  # tmp105, tmp110
 1168 0c36 C60032           movb    $50, (%rax) #, *_25
 269:main.cc       ****             for (int x = 0; x < 64; ++x)

This is part of the dump:

== buffer ==============================================================================================================
00000001 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 
00000002 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 
00000003 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 
00000004 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 0x31 
00000005 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 
00000006 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 
00000007 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 
00000008 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 0x32 

My machine topology:

Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-2640 0 @ 2.50GHz

This is the CPU type and flags.

processor   : 11
vendor_id   : GenuineIntel
cpu family  : 6
model       : 45
model name  : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-2640 0 @ 2.50GHz
stepping    : 7
microcode   : 0x70b
cpu MHz     : 1504.364
cache size  : 15360 KB
physical id : 0
siblings    : 12
core id     : 5
cpu cores   : 6
apicid      : 11
initial apicid  : 11
fpu     : yes
fpu_exception   : yes
cpuid level : 13
wp      : yes
flags       : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm pbe syscall nx pdpe1gb rdtscp lm constant_tsc arch_perfmon pebs bts rep_good nopl xtopology nonstop_tsc aperfmperf eagerfpu pni pclmulqdq dtes64 monitor ds_cpl vmx smx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr pdcm pcid dca sse4_1 sse4_2 x2apic popcnt tsc_deadline_timer aes xsave avx lahf_lm epb kaiser tpr_shadow vnmi flexpriority ept vpid xsaveopt dtherm ida arat pln pts
bugs        : cpu_meltdown spectre_v1 spectre_v2
bogomips    : 4987.77
clflush size    : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes   : 46 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

This is the complete source code:

//
//
//
//
#include <emmintrin.h>
#include <x86intrin.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <ctime>
#include <semaphore.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <string>


struct cache_line {
    char data[64];
};

//
// 32768 = 32 Kb = 512 64B cache lines
struct cache_l1 {
    struct cache_line cache[512];
};

size_t TOTAL = 100000;

void * thread_one (void * data);
void * thread_two (void * data);

void dump (FILE * file, char * buffer, size_t size);

class thread {
public:
    sem_t sem;
    sem_t * glob;
    pthread_t thr;
    struct cache_l1 * cache;
};

bool flush = false;

int main (int argc, char ** argv)
{
    bool same_core = false;
    bool same_buffer = false;
    bool align = false;
    bool misalign = false;
    size_t reserve_mem = 32768; // 15MB 15.728.640
    std::string file_name ("pseudobench_");
    std::string core_option ("diffcore");
    std::string buffer_option ("diffbuff");
    std::string cache_option ("l1");

    for (int i = 1; i < argc; ++i) {
        if (::strcmp("--same-core", argv[i]) == 0) {

            same_core = true;
            core_option = "samecore";

        } else if (::strcmp("--same-buffer", argv[i]) == 0) {

            same_buffer = true;
            buffer_option = "samebuffer";

        } else if (::strcmp("--l1", argv[i]) == 0) {

            // nothing already L1 cache size

        } else if (::strcmp("--l2", argv[i]) == 0) {

            reserve_mem *= 8; // 256KB, L2 cache size
            cache_option = "l2";

        } else if (::strcmp("--l3", argv[i]) == 0) {

            reserve_mem *= 480; // 15MB, L3 cache size
            cache_option = "l3";

        } else if (::strcmp("--ram", argv[i]) == 0) {

            reserve_mem *= 480; // 15MB, plus two times L1 cache size
            reserve_mem += sizeof(struct cache_l1) * 2;
            cache_option = "ram";

        } else if (::strcmp("--loops", argv[i]) == 0) {

            TOTAL = ::strtol(argv[++i], nullptr, 10) * 1000;
            printf ("%ld loops.\n", TOTAL);

        } else if (::strcmp("--align", argv[i]) == 0) {

            align = true;
            printf ("Align memory to 16 bytes.\n");

        } else if (::strcmp("--misalign", argv[i]) == 0) {

            misalign = true;
            printf ("Misalign memory.\n");

        } else if (::strcmp("--flush", argv[i]) == 0) {

            flush = true;
            printf ("Flushing caches.\n");

        } else if (::strcmp("-h", argv[i]) == 0) {

            printf ("There is no help here. Please put loops in units, "
                    "they will be multiplicated by thousands. (Default 100.000 EU separator)\n");
        } else {
            printf ("Unknown option: '%s', ignoring it.\n", argv[i]);
        }
    }

    char * ch = new char[(reserve_mem * 2) + (sizeof(struct cache_l1) * 2) + 16];
    struct cache_l1 * cache4 = nullptr;
    struct cache_l1 * cache5 = nullptr;

    if (align) {
        // Align memory (void *)(((uintptr_t)ch+15) & ~ (uintptr_t)0x0F);
        cache4 = (struct cache_l1 *) (((uintptr_t)ch + 15) & ~(uintptr_t)0x0F);
        cache5 = (struct cache_l1 *) &cache4[reserve_mem - sizeof(struct cache_l1)];
        cache5 = (struct cache_l1 *)(((uintptr_t)cache5) & ~(uintptr_t)0x0F);
    } else {
        cache4 = (struct cache_l1 *) ch;
        cache5 = (struct cache_l1 *) &ch[reserve_mem - sizeof(struct cache_l1)];
    }

    if (misalign) {
        cache4 = (struct cache_l1 *) ((char *)cache4 + 5);
        cache5 = (struct cache_l1 *) ((char *)cache5 + 5);
    }

    (void)cache4;
    (void)cache5;

    printf ("Cache size: %ld\n", sizeof(struct cache_l1));

    if (cache_option == "l1") {
        // L1 doesn't allow two buffers, so same buffer
        buffer_option = "samebuffer";
    }

    sem_t globsem;

    thread th1;
    thread th2;

    if (same_buffer) {
        printf ("Using same buffer.\n");
        th1.cache = cache5;
    } else {
        th1.cache = cache4;
    }
    th2.cache = cache5;

    sem_init (&globsem, 0, 0);

    if (sem_init(&th1.sem, 0, 0) < 0) {
        printf ("There is an error with the 1 semaphore.\n");
    }
    if (sem_init(&th2.sem, 0, 0) < 0) {
        printf ("There is an error with the 2 semaphore.\n");
    }

    th1.glob = &globsem;
    th2.glob = &globsem;

    cpu_set_t cpuset;
    int rc = 0;

    pthread_create (&th1.thr, nullptr, thread_one, &th1);
    CPU_ZERO (&cpuset);
    CPU_SET (0, &cpuset);
    rc = pthread_setaffinity_np(th1.thr,
                                sizeof(cpu_set_t),
                                &cpuset);
    if (rc != 0) {
        printf ("Can't change affinity of thread one!\n");
    }

    pthread_create (&th2.thr, nullptr, thread_two, &th2);
    CPU_ZERO (&cpuset);
    int cpu = 1;

    if (same_core) {
        printf ("Using same core. (HyperThreading)\n");
        cpu = 6; // Depends on CPU topoglogy (see that with lstopo)
    }

    CPU_SET (cpu, &cpuset);
    rc = pthread_setaffinity_np(th2.thr,
                                sizeof(cpu_set_t),
                                &cpuset);
    if (rc != 0) {
        printf ("Can't change affinity of thread two!\n");
    }

    printf ("Running in cores 0 and %d.\n", cpu);

    fprintf (stderr, "Waiting 2 seconds just for threads to be ready.\n");
    struct timespec time;
    time.tv_sec = 2;
    nanosleep (&time, nullptr);

    fprintf (stderr, "Post threads to begin work %ld iterations.\n", TOTAL);

    sem_post (&globsem);
    sem_post (&globsem);

    printf ("Waiting for thread semaphores.\n");

    sem_wait (&th1.sem);
    sem_wait (&th2.sem);

    printf ("We don't wait anymore.\n");

    printf ("Joining threads.\n");
    pthread_join (th1.thr, nullptr);
    pthread_join (th2.thr, nullptr);

    printf ("Dumping data.\n");
    file_name += core_option;
    file_name += "_";
    file_name += buffer_option;
    file_name += "_";
    file_name += cache_option;
    file_name += ".log";
    FILE * file = ::fopen(file_name.c_str(), "w");
    if (same_buffer)
        dump (file, (char *)cache5, sizeof(struct cache_l1));
    else {
        dump (file, (char *)cache4, sizeof(struct cache_l1));
        dump (file, (char *)cache5, sizeof(struct cache_l1));
    }
    printf ("Exiting from main thread.\n");
    return 0;
}

void * thread_one (void * data)
{
    thread * th = (thread *) data;
    printf ("Thread one created, pausing.\n");
    if (flush)
        _mm_clflush (th->cache);
    sem_wait (th->glob);

    printf ("Go ahead and calculate in 1...\n");
    printf ("Buffer address: %p.\n", th->cache);
    clock_t begin, end;
    double time_spent;
    register uint64_t counter = 0;
    begin = clock();
    for (size_t z = 0; z < TOTAL; ++z ) {
        ++counter;
        for (int i = 0; i < 512; i += 2) {
            ++counter;
            for (int x = 0; x < 64; ++x) {
                ++counter;
                th->cache->cache[i].data[x] = '1';
            }
        }
    }
    end = clock();
    time_spent = (double)(end - begin) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;    
    printf ("Time 1 %f %ld\n", time_spent, counter);

    sem_post (&th->sem);

    return nullptr;
}

void * thread_two (void * data)
{
    thread * th = (thread *) data;
    printf ("Thread two created, pausing.\n");
    if (flush)
        _mm_clflush (th->cache);
    sem_wait (th->glob);

    printf ("Go ahead and calculate in 2...\n");
    printf ("Buffer address: %p.\n", th->cache);
    clock_t begin, end;
    double time_spent;
    register uint64_t counter = 0;
    begin = clock();
    for (size_t z = 0; z < TOTAL; ++z ) {
        ++counter;
        for (int i = 1; i < 512; i += 2) {
            ++counter;;
            for (int x = 0; x < 64; ++x) {
                ++counter;
                th->cache->cache[i].data[x] = '2';
            }
        }
    }
    end = clock();
    time_spent = (double)(end - begin) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;    
    printf ("Time 2 %f  %ld\n", time_spent, counter);

    sem_post (&th->sem);

    return nullptr;
}

void dump (FILE * file, char * buffer, size_t size)
{
    size_t lines = 0;
    fprintf (file, "\n");
    fprintf (file, "== buffer =================================================="
             "============================================================\n");

    for (size_t i = 0; i < size; i += 16) {
        fprintf (file, "%08ld %p ", ++lines, &buffer[i]);
        for (size_t x = i; x < (i+16); ++x) {
            if (buffer[x] >= 32 && buffer[x] < 127)
                fprintf (file, "%c ", buffer[x]);
            else
                fprintf (file, ". ");
        }
        for (size_t x = i; x < (i+16); ++x) {
            fprintf (file, "0x%02x ", buffer[x]);
        }
        fprintf (file, "\n");
    }
    fprintf (file, "== buffer =================================================="
             "============================================================\n");
}
6
  • 3
    Compiling with optimization disabled is usually not a good idea. Look how nasty the asm is, keeping the loop counter in memory so it can run at best 1 iteration per ~6 cycles, bottlenecked on store-forwarding. This slows down the no-contention case, so you underestimate the slowdown from cache misses / contention. Aug 22, 2018 at 11:39
  • 4
    -O0 often doesn't even give you a rough idea. It often bottlenecks on different things than real code would. Your thread can't inline because it's a thread function (passed by function pointer to a library function). You should just compile with optimization and look at the resulting asm. (And make sure time taken scales ~linearly with TOTAL to check that it didn't optimize away the repeat-loop.) Aug 22, 2018 at 11:52
  • 1
    I've guessed if I have two threads, one making the first calculus, and the other the second. Normally you'd want to have both threads work on the first calculation, the first thread on the first half of your input, and the 2nd on the 2nd half. Then have both threads run the 2nd calculation. So the same thread touches the same memory multiple times, letting it benefit from L1 / L2 cache. Work in small chunks that fit in cache (cache-blocking). Or better, do both calculations in one pass to increase computation : memory ratio (computational intensity). Aug 22, 2018 at 12:00
  • 1
    See What Every Programmer Should Know About Memory? for more about cache-blocking. software.intel.com/en-us/articles/…. Aug 22, 2018 at 12:01
  • 3
    You also forgot to align your buffers. So both threads are actually touching every cache line, instead of your intended alternating cache liens. (See this comment. You might be getting some memory-order mis-speculation pipeline clears with hyperthreading. But mostly just competing for load/store ports on one core. Use perf stat to check. Aug 22, 2018 at 12:13

1 Answer 1

10

Apparently, there is no difference in taking data from L1, L2, L3 or RAM in order to do the calculations.

You are fully traversing each cache line at each level (and each page) before requesting the next. Memory accesses are slow, but they're not so slow that you can traverse an entire page before the next arrives. If you were to access a different L3 cache line or a different RAM page every access, you would certainly notice a difference. But the way you are doing it, you make your CPU churn through a ton of instructions between each L2, L3 or RAM request, completely hiding any kind of cache miss latency.

As such, you are not memory bound in the slightest. You have basically he most benign usage pattern possible: All your data is already cached almost all the time. Sometimes you will get a cache miss, but the fetch time for that pales in comparison to the time you spend working with cached data. Also, your CPU is likely to predict your (extremely predictable) usage pattern and already prefetch memory well before you access it.

So 10 seconds slower.
How's that possible? I've understood if the cache line isn't dirty, it wouldn't be fetched from memory (either, L1, 2, 3 or RAM).

As shown above, you are not memory bound. You are bound by how fast your CPU can churn through the instructions (edit: this is compounded by disabling optimizations, which will bloat the number of instructions), and it should not be a surprise that two hyperthreaded threads won't be as good at that as two threads on separate physical cores.

Of particular importance for this observation is that not all resources are duplicated for each pair of hyperthreaded cores. For example, the execution ports (e.g. adder, divider, floating point unit etc.) are not - those are shared. Here is a diagram of the Skylake scheduler to demonstrate the concept:

Execution ports on Intel Haswell

While hyperthreading, both threads have to contend over these resources (and even a single-threaded program will be affected by this design due to out-of-order execution). There are four simple integer ALUs in this design, but only one Store Data port. So two threads on the same core (in this Haswell CPU) cannot simultaneously store data, but they can compute several integer operations concurrently (note: No guarantee that it is actually port 4 that is the source of contention - some Intel tools may be able to figure this out for you). This limitation does not exist when splitting the load between two different physical cores.

There might be some overhead in synchronizing L2 cache lines between different physical cores (since L2 cache is apparently not shared between all cores for your CPU), but that's hard to gauge from here.

I found the above picture in this page, which gives a much more in-depth explanation of the above (and more): https://en.wikichip.org/wiki/intel/microarchitectures/skylake_(client)

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    The front-end isn't duplicated either, if that's what you mean by "instruction pipelines". The front-end (decode/rename+issue) alternates between logical cores, so the physical pipeline width is still only 4 fused-domain uops per clock. The OP's un-optimized code (compiled with -O0) bottlenecks on store/reload latency (keeping the loop counter in memory), so there is room for hyperthreading to gain total throughput, but I guess there are so many wasted instructions that the threads compete some. Aug 22, 2018 at 11:47
  • @PeterCordes I was just reading up and noticed that mistake, thanks for the correction! Aug 22, 2018 at 11:56
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    L2 is private per-core in Intel Sandybridge-family. But the OP didn't align their buffer (and they print the address, so we can see that malloc kept the first 16 bytes for metadata), so touching alternating 64-byte blocks in each thread means they do have to bounce between cores because each thread touches every cache line. Presumably one will get behind and fall further behind until it's not a problem anymore. If they were aligned, the adjacent-line L2 spatial prefetcher would maybe cause a problem. (of course assuming this used 16-byte stores instead of 1 byte to saturate mem b/w.) Aug 22, 2018 at 12:09

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