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When I have a scanf followed by a getchar, why does the getchar always keep getting the last delimiting character of scanf? How can I stop that? I tried looking into "format specifiers" for scanf, read quite a few things but none solves this.

The code is shown below -

#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>

int main()
{
    int a;
    char b;

    printf ("Enter an integer \n");
    scanf_s(" %d", &a);

    printf("Enter a character \n");
    b = getchar();

    printf("The integer you entered is %d \n", a);
    printf("The character you entered is %c \n", b);

    _getch();
    return 0;
}

The output is as below - Enter an integer 4563 Enter a character The integer you entered is 4563 The character you entered is

The enter key I press at the end of integer entry is being returned by getchar. The screen does not even stop after printing "Enter a character". What is the correct way to do this ?

  • 2
    #1 Don't mix scanf and other input function – Stargateur Aug 23 '18 at 1:39
  • the delimiter character (often a newline) is NOT input by a call to scanf() but rather left in stdin. Easiest/typical way to eliminate the delimiter character is to follow the call to scanf() with something like: int ch; while( (ch = getchar() ) != EOF && ch != 'delimiter' ) ; Usually the delimiter is the newline so 'delimiter' would be '\n'` – user3629249 Aug 23 '18 at 1:44
  • @user3629249 : Adding dummy getchar just to avoid the delimiter - is it not a patch ? Does it not have side effects ? – Bhawandeep Singh Sep 27 '18 at 17:26
1

Use the scanf(" %c", &b) instead of getchar()

When you put the space befor the %c you clean the buffer

Or you can clean the buffer using this too:

int ch;
while ((ch = getchar()) != '\n' && ch != EOF);

Complete example:

int main(void)
{
    printf("Enter an integer \n");
    int a;
    scanf(" %d", &a);
    int ch;
    while ((ch = getchar()) != '\n' && ch != EOF) {
    }

    printf("Enter a character \n");
    char b = getchar();

    printf("The integer you entered is %d \n", a);
    printf("The character you entered is %c \n", b);

    _getch();
}

But I think the scanf()

  • the space will consume an 'white space' so if the delimiter was 'white space' that will work great. If the delimiter was something else, this will not work – user3629249 Aug 23 '18 at 1:47
  • Hum, can you give me an example? – Fábio Morais Aug 23 '18 at 1:49
  • 1
    scanf with a space before the format specifier is doing what I was trying to do. Though tt does not handle cases when my character is a space or enter or tab i.e. any of the blank spaces. – Bhawandeep Singh Aug 23 '18 at 2:10
  • 1
    BTW, you didn't finish your last sentence and getchar() return an int – Stargateur Aug 23 '18 at 2:46
  • 1
    @BhawandeepSingh Consider getchar(); typically can return 256 different unsigned char values or the negative EOF. By saving those 257 potentially different values in an 8-bit char, some information is lost. With EOF == -1, how does code recall that the getchar() return value was 255 or -1? Even worse, when char is an unsigned char, with char b;, while (b != EOF) is never true. Also, is...() functions are well defined for the return values of getchar(), not all the negative values of char - which is UB. – chux Sep 27 '18 at 17:34

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