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I going to unit test a service which is using Entity Framework 6.

Sample scenario, it would have Blog and Post entity, Blog having zero or more Posts. In the service method it would return list of entities which having Blog's Title and Title of first Post of that Blog. It looks like below.

public class BlogService 
{
    private IBloggingContext _context;

    public BlogService(IBloggingContext context)
    {
        _context = context;
    }

    public List<BlogPostSumarry> GeBlogSummary()
    {
        var query = from b in _context.Blogs
                    orderby b.Name
                    select new BlogPostSumarry
                    {
                        BlogTitle = b.Name,
                        PostTitle = b.Posts.FirstOrDefault().Title
                    };

        return query.ToList();
    }
}

}

Unit Test Method

[Test]
    public void GeBlogSummary_WhenMatchFound()
    {
        var post = new List<Post>()
        {
            new Post() {PostId=45, Title="abc"}
        };

        var data = new List<Blog>
        {
            new Blog { Name = "BBB" },
            new Blog { Name = "ZZZ" },
            new Blog { Name = "AAA" },
        }.AsQueryable();

        var mockSet = new Mock<DbSet<Blog>>();
        mockSet.As<IQueryable<Blog>>().Setup(m => m.Provider).Returns(data.Provider);
        mockSet.As<IQueryable<Blog>>().Setup(m => m.Expression).Returns(data.Expression);
        mockSet.As<IQueryable<Blog>>().Setup(m => m.ElementType).Returns(data.ElementType);
        mockSet.As<IQueryable<Blog>>().Setup(m => m.GetEnumerator()).Returns(data.GetEnumerator());

        var mockContext = new Mock<BloggingContext>();
        mockContext.Setup(c => c.Blogs).Returns(mockSet.Object);

        var service = new BlogService(mockContext.Object);
        var blogs = service.GeBlogSummary();

        Assert.AreEqual(3, blogs.Count);
        Assert.AreEqual("AAA", blogs[0].BlogTitle);
        Assert.AreEqual("BBB", blogs[1].BlogTitle);
        Assert.AreEqual("ZZZ", blogs[2].BlogTitle);
    }

Unit test I use to mock DbContext and DbSet use in memory data. Problem is in case of blogs doesn’t have any post unit test will giving null reference exception where as in real scenario (Database) it works fine. This is because in a case of in memory it is Linq to Object where as in EF it is Linq to Entity.

For a example if I change the method like below it works UnitTest

public List<BlogPostSumarry> GeBlogSummary()
    {
        var query = from b in _context.Blogs
                    orderby b.Name
                    select new BlogPostSumarry
                    {
                        BlogTitle = b.Name,
//Manually checks for null validation works but any approach without change code for sack of unit test
                        PostTitle = b.Posts.Any() ? b.Posts.FirstOrDefault().Title : null
                    };

        return query.ToList();
    }

Once approach is change linq query for null check but I think it is not good approach. If so any suggestion how can I achieve my test?

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  • None of your blogs have posts so how do you expect b.Posts.FirstOrDefault() to return anything?
    – FCin
    Aug 24, 2018 at 10:05
  • It is just a one scenario. it depend of relationship between Blog and Posts. In here I thought like Blogs can have none more more Posts. Here is None scenario. Aug 24, 2018 at 10:09
  • Your logic is incorrect. If you use FirstOrDefault then you have to be prepared for having to deal with null. Instead do something like PostTitle = b.Posts.FirstOrDefault()?.Title ?? "No posts found"
    – FCin
    Aug 24, 2018 at 10:13
  • @FCin A "little" detail here is that ?. operator is not supported in expression trees (yet), so your suggestion simply doesn't compile.
    – Ivan Stoev
    Aug 24, 2018 at 10:20
  • @IvanStoev Thanks, I didn't try it out, but the idea is to just handle null if there are no posts.
    – FCin
    Aug 24, 2018 at 10:23

1 Answer 1

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In my experience you don't do isolated unit tests for database layer. You do integration tests for this code. You set up a real database (can be LocalDB, it is easy to configure) and run your tests against this test database.

When you try to mock your database, you are testing a mock of your database layer, not the real thing. And you might spend a lot of time tinkering with the mock, but will never get to behave exacty like the database will behave (unless you plan to write a copy of your database).

One of the reason for differerences - LINQ for memory objects just works differently to when it is translated to SQL. You can easily write LINQ that will be perfectly testable with mocks and you'll hvae passable tests. But when executed on real DB the same LINQ will fail because LINQ provider would not know how to translate that to SQL.

Whatever you do with your mock, your memory object will not be the same as SQL requests fired to your DB. And SQL requests is what you are really testing. If you are not testing these, then there is no point in pretending there is a DB behind the storage. Might as well just skip these tests.

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  • You can write easily mockable ef code that tests queries which is what you usually want. This doesn't answer the question and is just an opinion...
    – FCin
    Aug 24, 2018 at 9:59
  • 1
    @FCin Yes you can. Though amount of time you spend on a mock will exceed the time to set up testing DB. And it'll still won't be the 100% identical behaviour to the DB.
    – trailmax
    Aug 24, 2018 at 10:06
  • That is completely dependent on project you work on. I have hundreds of ef unit tests in my project and not a single one exceeds 10 lines of code. I have 1 method for generating context mock and that is it. On the other hand there are things that are very difficult to mock, but it doesn't mean that you should never write unit tests for ef.
    – FCin
    Aug 24, 2018 at 10:25
  • Integration tests are good, but quite expensive; also, they don't say the sample units behave correctly. So obviously, next to integration tests (especially regression) unit tests are also necessary. Obviously you don't test the DAL because of the lack of testable functions, but you will want to test the BL which uses the DAL to query the database - and since EF IS your DAL, you'll want to mock EF functionality (most prominently DbSets and exposed IQueryables). So while your point may be valid, there is more to it. Aug 24, 2018 at 11:04
  • 1
    Integration test to a database are the only way to test ef effectively since linq queries to in memory objects is completely different than linq queries to a true sql data source. I've seen many senior devs get tripped up by this because they've written unit tests that pass because of an in memory provider and then fail when handed over to testers because the same linq statement can't be translated to sql. Let's not even get started with testing at scale instead of with a completely clean database.
    – Fran
    Aug 24, 2018 at 13:58

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