20

I'm trying to get a random number generator. Since OsRng::new() can fail, I'd like to fall back to thread_rng() if I have to:

extern crate rand; // 0.5.5

use rand::{thread_rng, OsRng, RngCore};

fn rng() -> impl RngCore
{
    match OsRng::new() {
        Ok(rng) => rng,
        Err(e) => thread_rng()
    }
}

However, I get this error message which I cannot understand:

error[E0308]: match arms have incompatible types
 --> src/lib.rs:6:5
  |
6 | /     match OsRng::new() {
7 | |         Ok(rng) => rng,
8 | |         Err(e) => thread_rng(),
  | |                   ------------ match arm with an incompatible type
9 | |     }
  | |_____^ expected struct `rand::OsRng`, found struct `rand::ThreadRng`
  |
  = note: expected type `rand::OsRng`
             found type `rand::ThreadRng`

Why is the compiler expecting rand::OsRng here instead of an implementation of RngCore? If I remove the match and directly return thread_rng(), I don't get above error message.

I do not believe that this is a duplicate of How do I return an instance of a trait from a method?, as the other question is asking about how one can return a trait from a function, and this question is about why the compiler will not allow me to return a trait but wants me to return an OsRng which is not the return type of the function.

0

2 Answers 2

25

impl Trait is not equivalent to returning an interface or base class object. It's a way of saying "I don't want to write the name of the specific type I'm returning". You're still returning a value of a single, specific type; you just aren't saying which type.

Each of those branches is returning different types, hence the problem. Implementing the same trait is not enough.

What you likely want in this specific case is a trait object like Box<dyn RngCore>.

extern crate rand; // 0.6.5

use rand::{rngs::OsRng, thread_rng, RngCore};

fn rng() -> Box<dyn RngCore> {
    match OsRng::new() {
        Ok(rng) => Box::new(rng),
        Err(_) => Box::new(thread_rng()),
    }
}

Note: if you are using a slightly older version of Rust, you may need to remove the dyn keyword. It's optional in the previous (2015) edition of Rust.

2
  • 1
    What is the dyn keyword doing? It works just fine without it
    – msrd0
    Commented Aug 25, 2018 at 15:55
  • 12
    Technically, it's redundant. It was introduced to "clarify" what the code means: dyn RngCore is a dynamically dispatched type derived from the RngCore trait. dyn will be required in a future edition of Rust. It's exactly the sort of thing Shepmaster will edit, so I might as well get it over with now.
    – DK.
    Commented Aug 25, 2018 at 15:57
16

DK. has already explained why, but I'd like to provide an alternative workaround.

As mentioned in Conditionally iterate over one of several possible iterators, you can create an enum that implements a trait if both of its component types do. For example:

extern crate rand; // 0.6.5

use rand::{rngs::OsRng, thread_rng, RngCore};

fn rng() -> impl RngCore {
    match OsRng::new() {
        Ok(rng) => EitherRng::Left(rng),
        Err(_) => EitherRng::Right(thread_rng()),
    }
}

enum EitherRng<L, R> {
    Left(L),
    Right(R),
}

impl<L, R> RngCore for EitherRng<L, R>
where
    L: RngCore,
    R: RngCore,
{
    fn next_u32(&mut self) -> u32 {
        match self {
            EitherRng::Left(l) => l.next_u32(),
            EitherRng::Right(r) => r.next_u32(),
        }
    }

    fn next_u64(&mut self) -> u64 {
        match self {
            EitherRng::Left(l) => l.next_u64(),
            EitherRng::Right(r) => r.next_u64(),
        }
    }

    fn fill_bytes(&mut self, b: &mut [u8]) {
        match self {
            EitherRng::Left(l) => l.fill_bytes(b),
            EitherRng::Right(r) => r.fill_bytes(b),
        }
    }

    fn try_fill_bytes(&mut self, b: &mut [u8]) -> Result<(), rand::Error> {
        match self {
            EitherRng::Left(l) => l.try_fill_bytes(b),
            EitherRng::Right(r) => r.try_fill_bytes(b),
        }
    }
}

The either crate provides a lot of these types of implementations for fundamental traits.

See also:

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.