Definition:

A palindrome is a word, phrase, number or other sequence of units that has the property of reading the same in either direction

How to check if the given string is a palindrome?

This was one of the FAIQ [Frequently Asked Interview Question] a while ago but that mostly using C.

Looking for solutions in any and all languages possible.

closed as too broad by durron597, Paul Roub, Tiny Giant, gnat, Shankar Damodaran Sep 24 '15 at 3:50

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 19
    A man, a plan, a canal, Panama – Jonathan Sep 9 '08 at 14:26
  • 21
    Go hang a salami. I'm a lasagna hog. – xanadont Sep 9 '08 at 14:44
  • 4
    Do you care about punctuation? Case? What about locale-sensitive case folding? – erickson Sep 9 '08 at 15:19
  • well, i didnt think of punctuation issues which could be ignored! – prakash Sep 11 '08 at 14:43
  • 3
    I'm disappointed that, as far as I can tell, no one implemented it with a stack. – Nick Hodges Sep 7 '11 at 3:54

69 Answers 69

PHP sample:

$string = "A man, a plan, a canal, Panama";

function is_palindrome($string)
{
    $a = strtolower(preg_replace("/[^A-Za-z0-9]/","",$string));
    return $a==strrev($a);
}

Removes any non-alphanumeric characters (spaces, commas, exclamation points, etc.) to allow for full sentences as above, as well as simple words.

  • 4
    It doesn't work for numbers and languages other then English. – jfs Nov 4 '08 at 15:56
  • 18
    Just curious - why not strtolower() first so you have a shorter regex? – Chris Lutz Jul 3 '09 at 9:03

Windows XP (might also work on 2000) or later BATCH script:

@echo off

call :is_palindrome %1
if %ERRORLEVEL% == 0 (
    echo %1 is a palindrome
) else (
    echo %1 is NOT a palindrome
)
exit /B 0

:is_palindrome
    set word=%~1
    set reverse=
    call :reverse_chars "%word%"
    set return=1
    if "$%word%" == "$%reverse%" (
        set return=0
    )
exit /B %return%

:reverse_chars
    set chars=%~1
    set reverse=%chars:~0,1%%reverse%
    set chars=%chars:~1%
    if "$%chars%" == "$" (
        exit /B 0
    ) else (
        call :reverse_chars "%chars%"
    )
exit /B 0

Language agnostic meta-code then...

rev = StringReverse(originalString)
return ( rev == originalString );
  • Solutions like these are great because they are easy to follow. The solutions with loops, stacks, etc. are nice but harder to inspect than this one. All this needs is a line or two to trim it down to a fixed alphabet (just [a-zA-Z] characters?). – Michael Haren Sep 9 '08 at 14:45
  • You'd have to remove the spaces from the string first, otherwise palindrome's like "a man a plan a canal panama" wouldn't check properly. – Justin Bennett Sep 9 '08 at 14:53
  • In whatever language that is, why not just do "return StringReverse(originalString)==originalString" – rjmunro Sep 9 '08 at 18:00
  • 11
    I'm surprised this one is voted up so much considering it's wrong. As people have pointed out, it will not work for all palindromes, specifically with punctuation etc. The wisdom of crowds eh.. – SCdF Oct 23 '08 at 18:48
  • 13
    With a strict definition of a palindrome, however, this works exactly. The definition does not specify what "reading the same in either direction" means, and as such, a strict character for character comparison, which this is, is the most simple algorithm. – cdeszaq Oct 27 '08 at 21:39

C# in-place algorithm. Any preprocessing, like case insensitivity or stripping of whitespace and punctuation should be done before passing to this function.

boolean IsPalindrome(string s) {
    for (int i = 0; i < s.Length / 2; i++)
    {
        if (s[i] != s[s.Length - 1 - i]) return false;
    }
    return true;
}

Edit: removed unnecessary "+1" in loop condition and spent the saved comparison on removing the redundant Length comparison. Thanks to the commenters!

  • I think you have a benign fencepost error there. – Imbue Oct 27 '08 at 7:36
  • I think you need to be a little bit more specific there. – David Schmitt Oct 27 '08 at 21:14
  • 1
    Sorry, I'm talking about the s.Length / 2 + 1. It looks like the plus one will only ever make you check the middle letter in an odd length word, or the middle two letters in an even length word twice. – Imbue Oct 28 '08 at 19:05
  • 1
    I've agreed with Imbue. Consider s = 'aba': s.Length / 2 == 1 -> i<=1 -> s[1] = s[3 - 1 - 1] (unnecessary comparison of middle letter with itself) or s = 'ab': s.Length / 2 == 1 -> i <= 1 -> s[1] = s[2 - 1 - 1] (letters checked twice unnecessary). – jfs Nov 4 '08 at 12:15
  • Additionally It is unclear whether an empty string is a palindrome. – jfs Nov 4 '08 at 12:16

C#: LINQ

var str = "a b a";
var test = Enumerable.SequenceEqual(str.ToCharArray(), 
           str.ToCharArray().Reverse());
  • Nice! but a bit of an overkill IMHO – Abhijeet Patel Jan 22 '17 at 22:57

A more Ruby-style rewrite of Hal's Ruby version:

class String
  def palindrome?
    (test = gsub(/[^A-Za-z]/, '').downcase) == test.reverse
  end
end

Now you can call palindrome? on any string.

Unoptimized Python:

>>> def is_palindrome(s):
...     return s == s[::-1]
  • I try. I often fail, but not this time, it would seem. Thanks. – Blair Conrad Sep 9 '08 at 15:07
  • I was going to suggest that you could edit your answer to add in the whitespace and punctuation handling from my answer below but then it wouldn't be so pretty. :-) – Dave Webb Sep 9 '08 at 15:16
  • A one line function like that can be done as a lambda: is_palindrome=lambda s:s == s[::-1] – rjmunro Sep 9 '08 at 17:58
  • Why make a function at all, when you can just do "is_palindrome = s == s[::-1]"? ;) – Anders Sandvig Sep 9 '08 at 18:54
  • 1
    It doesn't work for sequences that doesn't support extended slicing. python.org/doc/2.5.2/ref/slicings.html . But def ispal(iterable): s = list(iterable); return s == s[::-1] does work. – jfs Nov 4 '08 at 16:38

Java solution:

public class QuickTest {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    check("AmanaplanacanalPanama".toLowerCase());
    check("Hello World".toLowerCase());
}

public static void check(String aString) {
    System.out.print(aString + ": ");
    char[] chars = aString.toCharArray();
    for (int i = 0, j = (chars.length - 1); i < (chars.length / 2); i++, j--) {
        if (chars[i] != chars[j]) {
            System.out.println("Not a palindrome!");
            return;
        }
    }
    System.out.println("Found a palindrome!");
}

}

  • Is this optimized , by my guess the running time is 0(N) – Rahul Kumar Feb 9 '13 at 17:08

Using a good data structure usually helps impress the professor:

Push half the chars onto a stack (Length / 2).
Pop and compare each char until the first unmatch.
If the stack has zero elements: palindrome.
*in the case of a string with an odd Length, throw out the middle char.

  • Using O(n) memory where a in-place algorithm works would probably not impress a professor – David Schmitt Sep 9 '08 at 14:42
  • *Assume a 101 course. ;) – xanadont Sep 9 '08 at 14:45
  • How would a Pushdown automaton know where the middle is? ;P – sleeplessnerd Jul 8 '11 at 0:21
  • To answer sleeplessnerd, you'd use a freelist. Essentially it's a 2nd stack that shrinks as the first one grows. Though that would probably be overkill on logic tests for if stack1.length() == 2.length() – Stephen J May 11 '12 at 18:23

C in the house. (not sure if you didn't want a C example here)

bool IsPalindrome(char *s)
{
    int  i,d;
    int  length = strlen(s);
    char cf, cb;

    for(i=0, d=length-1 ; i < length && d >= 0 ; i++ , d--)
    {
        while(cf= toupper(s[i]), (cf < 'A' || cf >'Z') && i < length-1)i++;
        while(cb= toupper(s[d]), (cb < 'A' || cb >'Z') && d > 0       )d--;
        if(cf != cb && cf >= 'A' && cf <= 'Z' && cb >= 'A' && cb <='Z')
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}

That will return true for "racecar", "Racecar", "race car", "racecar ", and "RaCe cAr". It would be easy to modify to include symbols or spaces as well, but I figure it's more useful to only count letters(and ignore case). This works for all palindromes I've found in the answers here, and I've been unable to trick it into false negatives/positives.

Also, if you don't like bool in a "C" program, it could obviously return int, with return 1 and return 0 for true and false respectively.

  • ofcourse, always loves the c solutions :) – prakash Sep 11 '08 at 10:05
  • 2
    I think you can optimize the exit condition to: for( ...; d>=i; ... ) It will cut the execution time by half – Uri Mar 31 '11 at 8:16

Here's a python way. Note: this isn't really that "pythonic" but it demonstrates the algorithm.

def IsPalindromeString(n):
    myLen = len(n)
    i = 0
    while i <= myLen/2:
        if n[i] != n[myLen-1-i]:
            return False
        i += 1
    return True
  • If you don't like: ispalindrome = lamdba s: s == s[::-1] then you could use def ispalindrome(seq): return all(seq[i] == seq[-i-1] for i in range(len(seq) // 2)) – jfs Nov 4 '08 at 16:23
  • 4
    btw, CamelCase is not recommended for function and local variable names. See 'Style Guide for Python Code' python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008 – jfs Nov 4 '08 at 16:26
Delphi

function IsPalindrome(const s: string): boolean;
var
  i, j: integer;
begin
  Result := false;
  j := Length(s);
  for i := 1 to Length(s) div 2 do begin
    if s[i] <> s[j] then
      Exit;
    Dec(j);
  end;
  Result := true;
end;

I'm seeing a lot of incorrect answers here. Any correct solution needs to ignore whitespace and punctuation (and any non-alphabetic characters actually) and needs to be case insensitive.

A few good example test cases are:

"A man, a plan, a canal, Panama."

"A Toyota's a Toyota."

"A"

""

As well as some non-palindromes.

Example solution in C# (note: empty and null strings are considered palindromes in this design, if this is not desired it's easy to change):

public static bool IsPalindrome(string palindromeCandidate)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(palindromeCandidate))
    {
        return true;
    }
    Regex nonAlphaChars = new Regex("[^a-z0-9]");
    string alphaOnlyCandidate = nonAlphaChars.Replace(palindromeCandidate.ToLower(), "");
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(alphaOnlyCandidate))
    {
        return true;
    }
    int leftIndex = 0;
    int rightIndex = alphaOnlyCandidate.Length - 1;
    while (rightIndex > leftIndex)
    {
        if (alphaOnlyCandidate[leftIndex] != alphaOnlyCandidate[rightIndex])
        {
            return false;
        }
        leftIndex++;
        rightIndex--;
    }
    return true;
}
  • Shouldn't the regex be Regex nonAlphaChars = new Regex("[^a-zA-Z0-9]"); So that we also take care of capitalized chars in the string – Learner Jul 18 '09 at 5:12
  • May be not..you have used ToLower....sorry I just missed it – Learner Jul 18 '09 at 5:12
  • You said: Any correct solution needs to ignore whitespace and punctuation (and any non-alphabetic characters actually) and needs to be case insensitive. What makes you think that this is true? Does anybody have a correct definition of a palindrome? Following the definition of the questionnee, I don't agree with you. – Fortega Feb 24 '10 at 17:19

EDIT: from the comments:

bool palindrome(std::string const& s) 
{ 
  return std::equal(s.begin(), s.end(), s.rbegin()); 
} 

The c++ way.

My naive implementation using the elegant iterators. In reality, you would probably check and stop once your forward iterator has past the halfway mark to your string.

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
bool palindrome(string foo)
{
    string::iterator front;
    string::reverse_iterator back;
    bool is_palindrome = true;
    for(front = foo.begin(), back = foo.rbegin();
        is_palindrome && front!= foo.end() && back != foo.rend();
        ++front, ++back
        )
    {
        if(*front != *back)
            is_palindrome = false;
    }
    return is_palindrome;
}
int main()
{
    string a = "hi there", b = "laval";

    cout << "String a: \"" << a << "\" is " << ((palindrome(a))? "" : "not ") << "a palindrome." <<endl;
    cout << "String b: \"" << b << "\" is " << ((palindrome(b))? "" : "not ") << "a palindrome." <<endl;

}
  • 1
    Or perhaps: bool palindrome(string foo) { return std::equal(foo.begin(), foo.end(), foo.rbegin()); } – Daniel James Sep 11 '08 at 11:12
  • Oh, and string should be passed as a reference: bool palindrome(string const& foo) { return std::equal(foo.begin(), foo.end(), foo.rbegin()); } – Daniel James Sep 11 '08 at 11:13
  • I like that, much more elegant. – Flame Sep 12 '08 at 5:45
  • 1
    love the std::equal() solution! – wilhelmtell Aug 21 '11 at 14:05
boolean isPalindrome(String str1) {
  //first strip out punctuation and spaces
  String stripped = str1.replaceAll("[^a-zA-Z0-9]", "");
  return stripped.equalsIgnoreCase((new StringBuilder(stripped)).reverse().toString());
}

Java version

  • Striktly I would not allow IgnoreCase for a palindrome. – Ralph M. Rickenbach Sep 9 '08 at 14:38
  • Why not? See merriam-webster.com/dictionary/palindrome – xanadont Sep 9 '08 at 14:42
  • Why not? If case matters then "A man a plan a canal Panama" isn't a palindrome. – Ryan Ahearn Sep 9 '08 at 14:43
  • Who says "A man a plan a canal Panama" is a palindrome? In my opinion, this does not read the same as "amanap lanac a nalp a nam a" – Fortega Feb 24 '10 at 17:23

Here's my solution, without using a strrev. Written in C#, but it will work in any language that has a string length function.

private static bool Pal(string s) {
    for (int i = 0; i < s.Length; i++) {
        if (s[i] != s[s.Length - 1 - i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
  • replace i < s.Length by i < s.Length / 2 – jfs Nov 4 '08 at 18:56
  • Doesn't work because it doesn't ignore whitespace or punctuation. – John Dibling Apr 17 '09 at 14:28
  • it will work in any language that has a string length function. -> that's not really true. s[i] does not compile in java :) – Fortega Feb 24 '10 at 17:21

Here's my solution in c#

static bool isPalindrome(string s)
{
    string allowedChars = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"+
        "1234567890ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
    string compareString = String.Empty;
    string rev = string.Empty;

    for (int i = 0; i <= s.Length - 1; i++)
    {
        char c = s[i];

        if (allowedChars.IndexOf(c) > -1)
        {
            compareString += c;
        }
    }


    for (int i = compareString.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        char c = compareString[i];
        rev += c;
    }

    return rev.Equals(compareString, 
        StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase);
}

Three versions in Smalltalk, from dumbest to correct.


In Smalltalk, = is the comparison operator:

isPalindrome: aString
    "Dumbest."
    ^ aString reverse = aString

The message #translateToLowercase returns the string as lowercase:

isPalindrome: aString
    "Case insensitive"
    |lowercase|
    lowercase := aString translateToLowercase.
    ^ lowercase reverse = lowercase

And in Smalltalk, strings are part of the Collection framework, you can use the message #select:thenCollect:, so here's the last version:

isPalindrome: aString
    "Case insensitive and keeping only alphabetic chars
    (blanks & punctuation insensitive)."
    |lowercaseLetters|
    lowercaseLetters := aString
        select: [:char | char isAlphabetic]
        thenCollect: [:char | char asLowercase]. 
    ^ lowercaseLetters reverse = lowercaseLetters

Here's a Python version that deals with different cases, punctuation and whitespace.

import string

def is_palindrome(palindrome):
    letters = palindrome.translate(string.maketrans("",""),
                  string.whitespace + string.punctuation).lower()
    return letters == letters[::-1]

Edit: Shamelessly stole from Blair Conrad's neater answer to remove the slightly clumsy list processing from my previous version.

C++

std::string a = "god";
std::string b = "lol";

std::cout << (std::string(a.rbegin(), a.rend()) == a) << " " 
          << (std::string(b.rbegin(), b.rend()) == b);

Bash

function ispalin { [ "$( echo -n $1 | tac -rs . )" = "$1" ]; }
echo "$(ispalin god && echo yes || echo no), $(ispalin lol && echo yes || echo no)"

Gnu Awk

/* obvious solution */
function ispalin(cand, i) { 
    for(i=0; i<length(cand)/2; i++) 
        if(substr(cand, length(cand)-i, 1) != substr(cand, i+1, 1)) 
            return 0; 
    return 1; 
}

/* not so obvious solution. cough cough */
{ 
    orig = $0;
    while($0) { 
        stuff = stuff gensub(/^.*(.)$/, "\\1", 1); 
        $0 = gensub(/^(.*).$/, "\\1", 1); 
    }
    print (stuff == orig); 
}

Haskell

Some brain dead way doing it in Haskell

ispalin :: [Char] -> Bool
ispalin a = a == (let xi (y:my) = (xi my) ++ [y]; xi [] = [] in \x -> xi x) a

Plain English

"Just reverse the string and if it is the same as before, it's a palindrome"

Ruby:

class String
    def is_palindrome?
        letters_only = gsub(/\W/,'').downcase
        letters_only == letters_only.reverse
    end
end

puts 'abc'.is_palindrome? # => false
puts 'aba'.is_palindrome? # => true
puts "Madam, I'm Adam.".is_palindrome? # => true

An obfuscated C version:

int IsPalindrome (char *s)
{
  char*a,*b,c=0;
  for(a=b=s;a<=b;c=(c?c==1?c=(*a&~32)-65>25u?*++a,1:2:c==2?(*--b&~32)-65<26u?3:2:c==3?(*b-65&~32)-(*a-65&~32)?*(b=s=0,a),4:*++a,1:0:*++b?0:1));
  return s!=0;
}

This Java code should work inside a boolean method:

Note: You only need to check the first half of the characters with the back half, otherwise you are overlapping and doubling the amount of checks that need to be made.

private static boolean doPal(String test) {
    for(int i = 0; i < test.length() / 2; i++) {
        if(test.charAt(i) != test.charAt(test.length() - 1 - i)) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Another C++ one. Optimized for speed and size.

bool is_palindrome(const std::string& candidate) {
    for(std::string::const_iterator left = candidate.begin(), right = candidate.end(); left < --right ; ++left)
        if (*left != *right)
            return false;
    return true;
}

Lisp:

(defun palindrome(x) (string= x (reverse x)))

Note that in the above C++ solutions, there was some problems.

One solution was inefficient because it passed an std::string by copy, and because it iterated over all the chars, instead of comparing only half the chars. Then, even when discovering the string was not a palindrome, it continued the loop, waiting its end before reporting "false".

The other was better, with a very small function, whose problem was that it was not able to test anything else than std::string. In C++, it is easy to extend an algorithm to a whole bunch of similar objects. By templating its std::string into "T", it would have worked on both std::string, std::wstring, std::vector and std::deque. But without major modification because of the use of the operator <, the std::list was out of its scope.

My own solutions try to show that a C++ solution won't stop at working on the exact current type, but will strive to work an anything that behaves the same way, no matter the type. For example, I could apply my palindrome tests on std::string, on vector of int or on list of "Anything" as long as Anything was comparable through its operator = (build in types, as well as classes).

Note that the template can even be extended with an optional type that can be used to compare the data. For example, if you want to compare in a case insensitive way, or even compare similar characters (like è, é, ë, ê and e).

Like king Leonidas would have said: "Templates ? This is C++ !!!"

So, in C++, there are at least 3 major ways to do it, each one leading to the other:

Solution A: In a c-like way

The problem is that until C++0X, we can't consider the std::string array of chars as contiguous, so we must "cheat" and retrieve the c_str() property. As we are using it in a read-only fashion, it should be ok...


bool isPalindromeA(const std::string & p_strText)
{
   if(p_strText.length() < 2) return true ;
   const char * pStart = p_strText.c_str() ;             
   const char * pEnd = pStart + p_strText.length() - 1 ; 

   for(; pStart < pEnd; ++pStart, --pEnd)
   {
      if(*pStart != *pEnd)
      {
         return false ;
      }
   }

   return true ;
}

Solution B: A more "C++" version

Now, we'll try to apply the same solution, but to any C++ container with random access to its items through operator []. For example, any std::basic_string, std::vector, std::deque, etc. Operator [] is constant access for those containers, so we won't lose undue speed.


template <typename T>
bool isPalindromeB(const T & p_aText)
{
   if(p_aText.empty()) return true ;
   typename T::size_type iStart = 0 ;
   typename T::size_type iEnd = p_aText.size() - 1 ;

   for(; iStart < iEnd; ++iStart, --iEnd)
   {
      if(p_aText[iStart] != p_aText[iEnd])
      {
         return false ;
      }
   }

   return true ;
}

Solution C: Template powah !

It will work with almost any unordered STL-like container with bidirectional iterators For example, any std::basic_string, std::vector, std::deque, std::list, etc. So, this function can be applied on all STL-like containers with the following conditions: 1 - T is a container with bidirectional iterator 2 - T's iterator points to a comparable type (through operator =)


template <typename T>
bool isPalindromeC(const T & p_aText)
{
   if(p_aText.empty()) return true ;
   typename T::const_iterator pStart = p_aText.begin() ;
   typename T::const_iterator pEnd = p_aText.end() ;
   --pEnd ;

   while(true)
   {
      if(*pStart != *pEnd)
      {
         return false ;
      }

      if((pStart == pEnd) || (++pStart == pEnd))
      {
         return true ;
      }

      --pEnd ;
   }
}

  • Fancy. How big will the string have to be so that this method is faster than comparing with the reverse? – Svante Nov 4 '08 at 13:22
  • If you don't have the reverse, then you have to allocate and then create it by copying the data. I guess that comparing the reverse is always slower, but for curiosity's sake, I'm interested in any "comparing the reverse" implementation. – paercebal Nov 30 '08 at 20:42
  • None of these work because you don't ignore whitespace or punctuation. – John Dibling Apr 17 '09 at 14:29
  • @John Dibling: Even if I handled punctuation and whitespace, it wouldn't work in Unicode on Linux because of UTF-8. The aim of this code is show C++ code, not produce an industrial-strength function. – paercebal May 26 '09 at 8:44

A simple Java solution:

public boolean isPalindrome(String testString) {
    StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer(testString);
    String reverseString = sb.reverse().toString();

    if(testString.equalsIgnoreCase(reverseString)) {
        return true;
    else {
        return false;
    }
}

Many ways to do it. I guess the key is to do it in the most efficient way possible (without looping the string). I would do it as a char array which can be reversed easily (using C#).

string mystring = "abracadabra";

char[] str = mystring.ToCharArray();
Array.Reverse(str);
string revstring = new string(str);

if (mystring.equals(revstring))
{
    Console.WriteLine("String is a Palindrome");
}

In Ruby, converting to lowercase and stripping everything not alphabetic:

def isPalindrome( string )
    ( test = string.downcase.gsub( /[^a-z]/, '' ) ) == test.reverse
end

But that feels like cheating, right? No pointers or anything! So here's a C version too, but without the lowercase and character stripping goodness:

#include <stdio.h>
int isPalindrome( char * string )
{
    char * i = string;
    char * p = string;
    while ( *++i ); while ( i > p && *p++ == *--i );
    return i <= p && *i++ == *--p;
}
int main( int argc, char **argv )
{
    if ( argc != 2 )
    {
        fprintf( stderr, "Usage: %s <word>\n", argv[0] );
        return -1;
    }
    fprintf( stdout, "%s\n", isPalindrome( argv[1] ) ? "yes" : "no" );
    return 0;
}

Well, that was fun - do I get the job ;^)

Using Java, using Apache Commons String Utils:

public boolean isPalindrome(String phrase) {
  phrase = phrase.toLowerCase().replaceAll("[^a-z]", "");
  return StringUtils.reverse(phrase).equals(phrase);
}

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