7

On this part the user gets to comment on posts. After it gets checked on server side and the data is recieved, I try to change the this.state.comments value. and so it's done. But the problem is, it is not changing the comment section on component. I have read the previous questions about rerendering so please don't mark as duplicate. Below is the code:

$.post("requests.php", {
    requestKey: 'newComment',
    commenterUser: commenterUser,
    commenterEmail: commenterEmail,
    theComment: theComment,
    pnum: pnum}, function(data, status, xhr){
      if(status == 'success'){
        if(data == 'commented'){
          this.setState({
            comments: data
          })
        }else{

        }
      }
    });

The data received is all the comments related to the post and the comments section is a place where all the comments are shown.

  • 2
    this.setState should not work here because this would be undefined, you should use arrow function or save this value before the post -> var that = this;, then user that.setState in the callback – Olivier Boissé Aug 25 '18 at 15:25
  • @Deepak but I've already written onSubmit={this.submitComment.bind(this)} and the value of state.commens do change. :( – S.Mhm Aug 25 '18 at 15:29
  • this is function scoped, even if you have bound your current function with this, you have another function inside submitComment. Either change the inner function to be an arrow function or the solution of @OlivierBoissé will do the job. – Brijesh Bhakta Aug 25 '18 at 15:36
5

You can also use arrow function instead of doing manual binding.

this.setState is not working because it has scope issue when you use normal function.

Change it to arrow function. Check below code

   $.post("requests.php", {
        requestKey: 'newComment',
        commenterUser: commenterUser,
        commenterEmail: commenterEmail,
        theComment: theComment,
            pnum: pnum}, (data, status, xhr) => {
                if(status == 'success'){
                    if(data == 'commented'){
                        this.setState({
                            comments: data
                        })
                    }else{

              }
           }
       });

Edit:

If you want to stay away with scope issues you can use arrow function. When you use arrow function then you no need to bind your function manually in constructor

 submitComment = () => {

 }

If you use normal function and to play with state or props inside that function, then you need to manually refer current object to a local variable like below

 let that = this;
 that.setState({
     name: “update”
 });

Sorry if there are any typo mistakes. I am answering in mobile

  • 1
    thanks, but what if I used onSubmit={this.submitComment.bind(this)}? – S.Mhm Aug 25 '18 at 15:49
  • Updated my post for your question. Check answer – Hemadri Dasari Aug 25 '18 at 15:56
  • 1
    thanks, it's working well now. appreciate your time:) – S.Mhm Aug 25 '18 at 15:59
2
let _this = this;
$.post("requests.php", {
  requestKey: 'newComment',
  commenterUser: commenterUser,
  commenterEmail: commenterEmail,
  theComment: theComment,
  pnum: pnum
}, function(data, status, xhr){
    if  (status == 'success'){
       if(data == 'commented'){
          _this.setState({ comments: data })
       } else{

       }
    }
});

I think the issue is with your scope of this, in javascript this is always in lexical context.

  • thanks, but what if I used onSubmit={this.submitComment.bind(this)}? – S.Mhm Aug 25 '18 at 15:50
  • It's the callback that would need to be binded. – Axnyff Aug 25 '18 at 15:52
2

You have a scope problem.

Let's consider this example:

function foo() {
    this.bar = 'lorem';
    this.ipsum = function() {
        console.log(this.bar);
    };
}

If you call ipsum, it will log undefined, because the this there refers to the ipsum function. Let's consider this example:

function foo() {
    this.bar = 'lorem';
    var that = this;
    this.ipsum = function() {
        console.log(that.bar);
    };
}

In this case that stores the outer this, so 'lorem' will be logged if ipsum is called. Let's consider an example for an arrow function:

function foo() {
    this.bar = 'lorem';
    this.ipsum = () => {
        console.log(this.bar);
    };
}

In this case if you call ipsum 'lorem' will be written to the console.

You can also use bind for this purpose.

Let's use an arrow function for your example:

$.post("requests.php", {
    requestKey: 'newComment',
    commenterUser: commenterUser,
    commenterEmail: commenterEmail,
    theComment: theComment,
    pnum: pnum}, (data, status, xhr) => {
      if(status == 'success'){
        if(data == 'commented'){
          this.setState({
            comments: data
          })
        }else{

        }
      }
    });
  • well, thank you. the text was so comprehensive. appreciate your time:) – S.Mhm Aug 25 '18 at 16:21

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