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I want to pass an instance of the parents class to the child's constructor and instead of assigning every single member of the parent with the child, I thought there might be an easier way to assign the parents member all at once. Here is my thought.

class Human {
    public $health = "200";
    public function __construct( $health ) {
        $this->health = $health;
    }
}

class Monster extends Human {
    public function __construct( \Human $human ) {
        parent::$this = $human;
    }
}

$unit = new \Monster( new \Human );

Is something similar or even is anything like this possible instead of this:

class Monster extends Human {
    public function __construct( \Human $human ) {
        $this->health = $human->health;
    }
}
  • hmm it looks a bit like you are trying "composition" instead of "inheritance". When you use composition, you'd pass in an instance of Human into your constructor of Monster, but in Monster it would have a private member variable that you assign to the Human passed in. In that way, Monster would not "extend" Human, but would contain within it a Human. – Chris Cousins Aug 26 '18 at 3:40
  • @ChrisCousins This is something i thought about as well, but the monster shall inherit the member of human. To access the member of human in monster i would need to "gather" through monster and then access humans members. Is that understandable? Monster is an extended version of human but has own member. – Blackxes Aug 26 '18 at 3:48
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One way to accomplish this (doesn't use inheritance though) is to look at making a "humanize" function that adds the data/function(s) to your class as follows:

const humanize = (WrappedComponent, health) => {
  let w = new WrappedComponent();
  w.health = health;
  w.getHealth = function() {
    return this.health;
  }
  return w;
}

class Monster {
}

const monster = humanize(Monster, 200);
console.log(monster.getHealth());

What this does is allows you to "humanize" any class/object you like; when you do so, it adds health member and a getHealth function.

| improve this answer | |
  • Hm.. this is something i would never do in oop php programming to be honest. This might be good solution for javascript (because it is in js) but in php it looks really bad. I really want to avoid global variables such a function would consider being global. Even within a namespace. – Blackxes Aug 26 '18 at 4:21
  • Inheritance is only useful if your class with always inherit from the parent and will only inherit from the parent. With wrapped components you can do: humanize(shielded(magical(new Monser()))) and then it can get all of those traits. Be wary of staying with "OOP" as it almost always fails you because the hierarchy you build is brittle. Also, inheritance (rather than dependency injection) is must harder to test in the long run. My two cents. – Chris Cousins Aug 26 '18 at 4:23
  • Yeah, its correct that the child will always inherit the values. And more values are not needed. Those classes were just placeholder. The real ones are called "Response" for Human, the base and "ErrorResponse" for Monster, the child. The system i build is based on oop. And trying to switch paradigma to something else would lead to confused user. – Blackxes Aug 26 '18 at 4:27

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