4

recently I am reading the source of spark. When reaching to the class of "org.apache.spark.deploy.SparkSubmit", I got confusion about the keyword "self" and the operator "=>". Is anyone can explain me for that?

override def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
val submit = new SparkSubmit() {
  self =>

  override protected def parseArguments(args: Array[String]): SparkSubmitArguments = {
    new SparkSubmitArguments(args) {
      override protected def logInfo(msg: => String): Unit = self.logInfo(msg)

      override protected def logWarning(msg: => String): Unit = self.logWarning(msg)
    }
  }

  override protected def logInfo(msg: => String): Unit = printMessage(msg)

  override protected def logWarning(msg: => String): Unit = printMessage(s"Warning: $msg")

  override def doSubmit(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
    try {
      super.doSubmit(args)
    } catch {
      case e: SparkUserAppException =>
        exitFn(e.exitCode)
      case e: SparkException =>
        printErrorAndExit(e.getMessage())
    }
  }

}

BTW: this question is totally different from the “duplicated one”. Although these two are very same, what i am asking is about the “self =>” near the key word of “new class” rather than the “duplicated” with “ some name =>” in the class definition of scala. it’s not a same question

11
  • Stable identifier for the this of anon class implementing SparkSubmit
    – cchantep
    Aug 26, 2018 at 9:22
  • @cchantep so if there is not “self”, is any difference between them? Aug 26, 2018 at 9:24
  • This is incorrectly marked as a duplicate. The other question is about declaring self types, whereas there is no self type in this question.
    – Tim
    Aug 26, 2018 at 9:35
  • This is the answer to the question: Using self => allows the identity of this class to be used where this is not available. Specifically, inside the new SparkSubmitArguments constructor the this pointer refers to the new class not the outer class. By declaring self as an alias for the outer class it can be used in the inner class.
    – Tim
    Aug 26, 2018 at 9:39
  • @Tim do you know how to apply a complaint for the “incorrect duplicated”? Aug 26, 2018 at 9:42

2 Answers 2

11

The statement

self =>

is called a "self type annotation" and it creates a value named self that refers to the instance of the class being constructed. This can be used in places where the this value for the class is not available. In particular, it can be used inside a nested class, where this refers to the nested class and a reference to the outer class is not automatically available.

In your case, self is used here:

new SparkSubmitArguments(args) {
  override protected def logInfo(msg: => String): Unit = self.logInfo(msg)

  override protected def logWarning(msg: => String): Unit = self.logWarning(msg)
}

This makes the new instance of SparkSubmitArguments use the logInfo and logWaringing methods from the outer, containing class. You can't use this at this point of the code because it would refer to the inner class, not the outer class. (If you do use this here you will get an infinite loop)

5

It's an alias for this. This is done to disambiguate self-reference in inner classes.

When you use this in the scope of an inner class, it refers to the inner class' instance. If you need a reference to the outer class, you would need an alias though:

  class Foo { self => 
    val x = 1
    new AnyRef { 
      val x = 2
      println(this.x) // 2
      println(self.x) // 1
    }
  }
6
  • What is the result if the "self =>" is deleted? Aug 26, 2018 at 11:33
  • Then lines like this self.logInfo(msg) will not compile, because self would be undefined.
    – Dima
    Aug 26, 2018 at 11:38
  • You can easily find out answers to questions like this ("what would happen if ...") yourself BTW. ;)
    – Dima
    Aug 26, 2018 at 11:44
  • The self type annotation is not useless. Without it you would not be able to call the outer implementation of logInfo and logWarning from the inner class. If you replace self with this as you suggest then the logInfo and logWarning in the inner class would be calling themselves.
    – Tim
    Aug 26, 2018 at 13:22
  • @Tim, oh, you are right! I didn't notice that there are two inner classes there
    – Dima
    Aug 26, 2018 at 13:29

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