128

W3CSchools has this example:

var fruits = ["Banana", "Orange", "Apple", "Mango"];
fruits.sort();
fruits.reverse();

Is this the most efficient way to sort strings in descending order in Javascript?

Update

One of the answers is using localeCompare. Just curious whether if we do reverse(), will that work for all locales (Maybe this is a separate question - Just let me know in the comments)?

9
  • 1
    By what measure of efficiency? Commented Aug 26, 2018 at 20:42
  • Possible duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/1063007/…
    – Asons
    Commented Aug 26, 2018 at 20:49
  • 1
    .sort() and .reverse() is already the most efficient way. Commented Aug 26, 2018 at 20:52
  • 1
    .sort((a, b) => -(a>b)||+(a<b))
    – Bergi
    Commented Aug 26, 2018 at 20:53
  • reverse() doesn't care about the locales, it only modifies the indexes of the array in reverse order
    – colxi
    Commented Aug 26, 2018 at 21:25

5 Answers 5

225

If you consider

obj.sort().reverse();

VS

obj.sort((a, b) => (a > b ? -1 : 1))

VS

obj.sort((a, b) => b.localeCompare(a) )

The performance winner is : obj.sort().reverse().

Testing with an array of 10.000 elements, obj.sort().reverse() is faster than obj.sort( function ) (except on chrome), and obj.sort( function ) (using localCompare).

Performance test here :

var results = [[],[],[]]

for(let i = 0; i < 100; i++){
  const randomArrayGen = () => Array.from({length: 10000}, () => Math.random().toString(30));
  const randomArray = randomArrayGen();
  const copyArray = x => x.slice();

  obj = copyArray(randomArray);
  let t0 = performance.now();
  obj.sort().reverse();
  let t1 = performance.now();

  obj = copyArray(randomArray);
  let t2 = performance.now();
  obj.sort((a, b) => (a > b ? -1 : 1))
  let t3 = performance.now();

  obj = copyArray(randomArray);
  let t4 = performance.now();
  obj.sort((a, b) => b.localeCompare(a))
  let t5 = performance.now();  

  results[0].push(t1 - t0);
  results[1].push(t3 - t2);
  results[2].push(t5 - t4);  
}

const calculateAverage = x => x.reduce((a,b) => a + b) / x.length ;

console.log("obj.sort().reverse():                   " + calculateAverage(results[0]));
console.log("obj.sort((a, b) => (a > b ? -1 : 1)):   " + calculateAverage(results[1]));
console.log("obj.sort((a, b) => b.localeCompare(a)): " + calculateAverage(results[2]));

9
  • 1
    i uodated my answer and the jsperf, to include the localCompare case
    – colxi
    Commented Aug 26, 2018 at 21:10
  • 1
    the same situation woud be (a,b)=>b.localeCompare(a)) not b.localeCompare(a, 'es', {sensitivity: 'base'})) that is for special characters. obj.sort().reverse() doesn't work with special characters
    – Emeeus
    Commented Aug 26, 2018 at 21:14
  • 5
    (a, b) => (a > b ? -1 : 1) is not enough
    – Bergi
    Commented Aug 27, 2018 at 15:28
  • 1
    Node benchmarks on my machine show #2 as being the fastest: obj.sort().reverse(): 3.090556930010207 obj.sort((a, b) => (a > b ? -1 : 1)): 2.7984550699871034 obj.sort((a, b) => b.localeCompare(a)): 10.975987620060332
    – user4945014
    Commented Jun 15, 2020 at 2:50
  • 2
    obj.sort((a, b) => b - a) only works for numbers, not strings!
    – Doin
    Commented Jan 19, 2022 at 11:43
8

Using just sort and reverse a > Z , that is wrong if you want to order lower cases and upper cases strings:

var arr = ["a","b","c","A","B","Z"];

arr.sort().reverse();

console.log(arr)//<-- [ 'c', 'b', 'a', 'Z', 'B', 'A' ] wrong!!!

English characters

var arr = ["a","b","c","A","B","Z"];

arr.sort((a,b)=>b.localeCompare(a))

console.log(arr)

Special characters using locales, in this example es (spanish)

var arr = ["a", "á", "b","c","A","Á","B","Z"];

arr.sort((a, b) => b.localeCompare(a, 'es', {sensitivity: 'base'}))


console.log(arr)

sensitivity in this case is base:

Only strings that differ in base letters compare as unequal. Examples: a ≠ b, a = á, a = A.

2
  • 2
    What makes you think it is wrong? OP asked to make the sorting descending, not to make it case-invariant.
    – Bergi
    Commented Aug 27, 2018 at 15:25
  • 2
    @Bergi Using sort and reverse could solve the problem that OP is facing using that specific set of data, it is not good as a general solution in my opinion. Also OP said in the title strings, not certain kind of strings. Either way "is wrong" is a bad generalization.
    – Emeeus
    Commented Aug 27, 2018 at 15:45
4

The easiest way to revers the order of sorting is by swapping the operands. In ES2015 that's as easy as [b, a] = [a, b]. A full example:

function compareWithOrder(a, b, shouldReverse = false) {
  if (shouldReverse) {
    [b, a] = [a, b]
  }
  return yourComparatorFn(a, b)
}
0

var arr = ["a","b","c","A","B","Z"];

arr.sort((a,b)=>b.localeCompare(a))

console.log(arr)

1
  • 2
    This doesn't address the question. What are your metrics for efficiency? Commented Oct 8, 2019 at 19:46
0

I know this is an old question, but an interesting one. This is my solution for a non-special character's input.

var arr = ["a","b","c","A","B","Z"];

  console.log(arr.sort((a,b)=> {
      const lastCodeIn = b.toLowerCase().charCodeAt();
      const lastCode = b.charCodeAt();
      const firstCodeIn = a.toLowerCase().charCodeAt();
      const firstCode = a.charCodeAt();

      if(lastCodeIn - firstCodeIn === 0){
        return lastCode - firstCode;
      }
      return lastCodeIn - firstCodeIn;
    })
  );//[ 'Z', 'c', 'b', 'B', 'a', 'A' ]

The reason is that ascii code for UPPER case are lower than lower case.

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