6

For whatever reason I am having issues with alpha blending in metal. I am drawing to a MTKView and for every pipeline that I create I do the following:

descriptor.colorAttachments[0].blendingEnabled = YES;
descriptor.colorAttachments[0].rgbBlendOperation = MTLBlendOperationAdd;
descriptor.colorAttachments[0].alphaBlendOperation = MTLBlendOperationAdd;
descriptor.colorAttachments[0].sourceRGBBlendFactor = MTLBlendFactorSourceAlpha;
descriptor.colorAttachments[0].sourceAlphaBlendFactor = MTLBlendFactorSourceAlpha;
descriptor.colorAttachments[0].destinationRGBBlendFactor = MTLBlendFactorOneMinusSourceAlpha;
descriptor.colorAttachments[0].destinationAlphaBlendFactor = MTLBlendFactorOneMinusSourceAlpha;

However for whatever reason that is not causing alpha testing to happen. You can even check in the frame debugger and you will see vertices with an alpha of 0 that are being drawn black rather than transparent.

One thought I had is that some geometry ends up on the exact same z plane so if alpha blending does not work on the same z plane that might cause an issue. But I dont think that is a thing.

Why is alpha blending not working?

I am hoping to blend as if they were transparent glass. Think like this.

enter image description here

11
  • Are you expecting parts of the view to end up transparent so views/windows behind it are visible? Or is there some existing rendering in the same view that's being drawn over? What's the load action for the color attachment? If it's "clear", what is the clear color? Aug 27, 2018 at 14:24
  • Clear color is the background color which is black. Each frame the load action is clear so everything is cleared to black. There are a lot of 2D triangles drawn each with various levels of transparency. So the hope is that their transparency is visible.
    – J.Doe
    Aug 27, 2018 at 17:37
  • Given the blending you're using, if a triangle is drawn with transparency on black, you "see" the black through the triangle. It doesn't punch a transparent hole in the black. I ask again: do you want your view to end up partially transparent so views/windows behind it are visible? Aug 27, 2018 at 17:40
  • Correct. The problem is that two triangles of half transparency drawn over each-other would result in a dark triangle of the color of whichever one has lesser depth. Essentially the one of lesser depth blocked the one of greater depth from contributing to the color.
    – J.Doe
    Aug 27, 2018 at 17:42
  • I am essentially looking for the look of glass overlapping. I updated the question with a picture.
    – J.Doe
    Aug 27, 2018 at 17:45

1 Answer 1

11

Alpha blending is an order-dependent transparency technique. This means that the (semi-)transparent objects cannot be rendered in any arbitrary order as is the case for (more expensive) order-independent transparency techniques.

  1. Make sure your transparent 2D objects (e.g., circle, rectangle, etc.) have different depth values. (This way you can define the draw ordering yourself. Otherwise the draw ordering depends on the implementation of the sorting algorithm and the initial ordering before sorting.)
  2. Sort these 2D objects based on their depth value from back to front.
  3. Draw the 2D objects from back to front (painter's algorithm) using alpha blending. (Of course, your 2D objects need an alpha value < 1 to actually see some blending.)

Your blend state for alpha blending is correct:

// The blend formula is defined as:
// (source.rgb * sourceRGBBlendFactor  )   rgbBlendOperation (destination.rgb * destinationRGBBlendFactor  ) 
// (source.a   * sourceAlphaBlendFactor) alphaBlendOperation (destination.a   * destinationAlphaBlendFactor)
// <=>
// (source.rgba * source.a) + (destination.rgba * (1-source.a))

descriptor.colorAttachments[0].blendingEnabled             = YES;
descriptor.colorAttachments[0].rgbBlendOperation           = MTLBlendOperationAdd;
descriptor.colorAttachments[0].alphaBlendOperation         = MTLBlendOperationAdd;
descriptor.colorAttachments[0].sourceRGBBlendFactor        = MTLBlendFactorSourceAlpha;
descriptor.colorAttachments[0].sourceAlphaBlendFactor      = MTLBlendFactorSourceAlpha;
descriptor.colorAttachments[0].destinationRGBBlendFactor   = MTLBlendFactorOneMinusSourceAlpha;
descriptor.colorAttachments[0].destinationAlphaBlendFactor = MTLBlendFactorOneMinusSourceAlpha;
1
  • 3
    In swift this gives: << descriptor.colorAttachments[0].isBlendingEnabled = true descriptor.colorAttachments[0].rgbBlendOperation = .add; descriptor.colorAttachments[0].alphaBlendOperation = .add; descriptor.colorAttachments[0].sourceRGBBlendFactor = .sourceAlpha; descriptor.colorAttachments[0].sourceAlphaBlendFactor = .sourceAlpha; descriptor.colorAttachments[0].destinationRGBBlendFactor = .oneMinusSourceAlpha; descriptor.colorAttachments[0].destinationAlphaBlendFactor = .oneMinusSourceAlpha; >>
    – dgmz
    Mar 3, 2020 at 23:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.