3

I got a really big ass nested map in Clojure and I am searching for the most idiomatic way to kick out keys, which should not provided to the frontend (yes, this clojure service is running in the backend).

The datastructure looks like:

(def data
  {:a 1
   :b 2
   :c 3
   :d [{:e 5}
       {:f 6
        :g {
            :h 8
            :i 9
            :j 10}
        :l [{
             :m 11
             :n 12
             :p {:q 13
                 :r 14
                 :s 15
                 }}
            {:m 16
             :n 17
             :p {:q 18
                 :r 19
                 :s 20
                 }}]}]})

As you can see, I got a map with keys, whereby some keys got lists with maps, which have some lists again...so I know -> not pretty.

BUT...is there some way of describing the data I want to get so that every keys I do not want, get filtered out?

Thx

  • Maybe, but I is this the best way? I could also do it iteratively...but maybe a schema can be written, which I somehow can apply to the data. – Tobias S Aug 27 '18 at 13:35
  • 1
    What do you want to extract from the input? You've pasted a big ol' map and said you want only some of it, but what part? How do you decide what is worth including? – amalloy Aug 29 '18 at 5:20
9
0

yet another way, without using any external libs, employing clojure.walk:

(defn remove-deep [key-set data]
  (clojure.walk/prewalk (fn [node] (if (map? node)
                                     (apply dissoc node key-set)
                                     node))
                        data))


user> (remove-deep [:i :l] data)
;;=> {:a 1, :b 2, :c 3, :d [{:e 5} {:f 6, :g {:h 8, :j 10}}]}

user> (remove-deep [:f :p] data)
;;=> {:a 1, :b 2, :c 3, :d [{:e 5} {:g {:h 8, :i 9, :j 10}, :l [{:m 11, :n 12} {:m 16, :n 17}]}]}

The pre/postwalk is there for the exact use case you have: walk down the heterogenous collections, transforming values if necessary

| improve this answer | |
  • Yes, that is simpler than searching for 2-vecs (MapEntry pairs). – Alan Thompson Aug 27 '18 at 15:43
4
0

If you want to filter for the top-level keys only you can use select-keys

If you want to remove deeply nested keys you can use specter. For example to remove all values under :h under :g under every items in the vector under :d just write:

user> (setval [:d ALL :g :h] NONE data)
| improve this answer | |
4
0

The simplest is to use clojure.walk/postwalk. I'm assuming you don't need to worry about any key combinations like "remove :i only if it's a child of :f".

Here is an example:

(ns tst.demo.core
  (:use demo.core tupelo.core tupelo.test)
  (:require [clojure.walk :as walk]))

(def data
  {:a 1
   :b 2
   :c 3
   :d [{:e 5}
       {:f 6
        :g {
            :h 8
            :i 9
            :j 10}
        :l [{
             :m 11
             :n 12
             :p {:q 13
                 :r 14
                 :s 15
                 }}
            {:m 16
             :n 17
             :p {:q 18
                 :r 19
                 :s 20
                 }}]}]})

(defn remove-keys [data keys]
  (let [proc-node  (fn [node]
                     (spyx node))
        result (walk/postwalk proc-node data) ]
    (spyx-pretty result)))

(def bad-keys #{:b :f :i :p :n})

(dotest
  (remove-keys data bad-keys))

This shows the recursive processing of postwalk, with output:

Testing tst.demo.core
node => :a
node => 1
node => [:a 1]
node => :b
node => 2
node => [:b 2]
node => :c
node => 3
node => [:c 3]
node => :d
node => :e
node => 5
node => [:e 5]
node => {:e 5}
node => :f
node => 6
node => [:f 6]
node => :g
node => :h
node => 8
node => [:h 8]
node => :i
node => 9
node => [:i 9]
node => :j
node => 10
node => [:j 10]
node => {:h 8, :i 9, :j 10}
node => [:g {:h 8, :i 9, :j 10}]
node => :l
node => :m
node => 11
node => [:m 11]
node => :n
node => 12
node => [:n 12]
node => :p
node => :q
node => 13
node => [:q 13]
node => :r
node => 14
node => [:r 14]
node => :s
node => 15
node => [:s 15]
node => {:q 13, :r 14, :s 15}
node => [:p {:q 13, :r 14, :s 15}]
node => {:m 11, :n 12, :p {:q 13, :r 14, :s 15}}
node => :m
node => 16
node => [:m 16]
node => :n
node => 17
node => [:n 17]
node => :p
node => :q
node => 18
node => [:q 18]
node => :r
node => 19
node => [:r 19]
node => :s
node => 20
node => [:s 20]
node => {:q 18, :r 19, :s 20}
node => [:p {:q 18, :r 19, :s 20}]
node => {:m 16, :n 17, :p {:q 18, :r 19, :s 20}}
node => [{:m 11, :n 12, :p {:q 13, :r 14, :s 15}} {:m 16, :n 17, :p {:q 18, :r 19, :s 20}}]
node => [:l [{:m 11, :n 12, :p {:q 13, :r 14, :s 15}} {:m 16, :n 17, :p {:q 18, :r 19, :s 20}}]]
node => {:f 6, :g {:h 8, :i 9, :j 10}, :l [{:m 11, :n 12, :p {:q 13, :r 14, :s 15}} {:m 16, :n 17, :p {:q 18, :r 19, :s 20}}]}
node => [{:e 5} {:f 6, :g {:h 8, :i 9, :j 10}, :l [{:m 11, :n 12, :p {:q 13, :r 14, :s 15}} {:m 16, :n 17, :p {:q 18, :r 19, :s 20}}]}]
node => [:d [{:e 5} {:f 6, :g {:h 8, :i 9, :j 10}, :l [{:m 11, :n 12, :p {:q 13, :r 14, :s 15}} {:m 16, :n 17, :p {:q 18, :r 19, :s 20}}]}]]
node => {:a 1, :b 2, :c 3, :d [{:e 5} {:f 6, :g {:h 8, :i 9, :j 10}, :l [{:m 11, :n 12, :p {:q 13, :r 14, :s 15}} {:m 16, :n 17, :p {:q 18, :r 19, :s 20}}]}]}
result => 
{:a 1,
 :b 2,
 :c 3,
 :d
 [{:e 5}
  {:f 6,
   :g {:h 8, :i 9, :j 10},
   :l
   [{:m 11, :n 12, :p {:q 13, :r 14, :s 15}}
    {:m 16, :n 17, :p {:q 18, :r 19, :s 20}}]}]}

You can see that maps are first turned into vectors of key-value pairs like [:n 17]. So, when you get a 2-vec like that, just look at the first item and return a nil if you don't like it:

(defn len-2-vec? [node]
  (and (sequential? node)
    (= 2 (count node))))

(defn remove-keys [data bad-keys]
  (let [proc-node (fn [node]
                    (if (and (len-2-vec? node)
                          (contains? bad-keys (first node)))
                      (do
                        (spyx :removed node)
                        nil)
                      node))
        result (walk/postwalk proc-node data) ]
    (spyx-pretty result)))

(def bad-keys #{:b :f :i :p :n})

(dotest
  (remove-keys data bad-keys))

and output:

Testing tst.demo.core
:removed    node => [:b 2]
:removed    node => [:f 6]
:removed    node => [:i 9]
:removed    node => [:n 12]
:removed    node => [:p {:q 13, :r 14, :s 15}]
:removed    node => [:n 17]
:removed    node => [:p {:q 18, :r 19, :s 20}]

(remove-keys data bad-keys) => 
{:a 1, 
 :c 3, 
 :d [{:e 5} 
     {:g {:h 8, 
          :j 10}, 
      :l [{:m 11}
          {:m 16}]}]}

Ran 2 tests containing 0 assertions.
0 failures, 0 errors.

Don't forget the Clojure CheatSheet.

Here is the doc for spyx.

| improve this answer | |
3
0

This might be using more "manual lifting" than required, but a simple recursive function handles this well:

(defn filter-nested [root keys-to-remove]
  (let [should-remove? (set keys-to-remove)

        ; A recursive function to search through the map
        f (fn rec [node]
            (reduce-kv (fn [acc k v]
                         (cond
                           ; If it's in the set, remove the key from the node
                           (should-remove? k) (dissoc acc k)

                           ; If the value is a map, recursively search it too
                           (map? v) (assoc acc k (rec v))

                           ; If it's a vector, map a recursive call over the vector
                           (vector? v) (assoc acc k (mapv rec v))

                           ; Else do nothing
                           :else acc))
                       node
                       node))]
    (f root)))

(filter-nested data #{:l})
=> {:a 1, :b 2, :c 3, :d [{:e 5} {:f 6, :g {:h 8, :i 9, :j 10}}]}

Once you take into consideration the explanatory comments, it isn't as big as it looks. f (named rec internally) is a recursive function that dissocs keys from the found map when they're in the supplied list of keys. When the value it finds is a map or vector, it recurses to search them as well.

| improve this answer | |
1
0

Instead of using blacklist, we wanted to have some kind of whitelist. In production it is not a very good idea to work with blacklist - if for some reason the response object may be get extended. Therefore we now use https://github.com/metosin/spec-tools with the strip-extra-keys-transformer like:

(ns sexy.helper.transformer
  (:require [spec-tools.core :as st]
            [spec-tools.data-spec :as ds]))

(def my-abc {:a "12345"
               :b "00529"
               :c [{:d "Kartoffel"
                    :e 5}
                   {:d "Second Item"
                    :e 9999}]})

(def the-abc
  {:a string?
   :c [{:d string?}]})

(def abc-spec
  (ds/spec ::abc the-abc))

(st/conform abc-spec my-abc st/strip-extra-keys-transformer)
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.