2

From what I understand about folds in Haskell, foldl (-) 0 [1..5] gives a result of -15 by calculating 0-1-2-3-4-5, and foldr (-) 0 [1..5] gives a result of -5 by calculating 5-4-3-2-1-0. Why is it then that both foldl (++) "" ["a", "b", "c"] and foldr (++) "" ["a", "b", "c"] give a result of "abc", and the result of foldr is not, instead, "cba"?

Is there something I'm missing in understanding the differences between foldl and foldr?

12

I think this part from the docs makes it clearer:


In the case of lists, foldr, when applied to a binary operator, a starting value (typically the right-identity of the operator), and a list, reduces the list using the binary operator, from right to left:

foldr f z [x1, x2, ..., xn] == x1 `f` (x2 `f` ... (xn `f` z)...)

. . .

In the case of lists, foldl, when applied to a binary operator, a starting value (typically the left-identity of the operator), and a list, reduces the list using the binary operator, from left to right:

foldl f z [x1, x2, ..., xn] == (...((z `f` x1) `f` x2) `f`...) `f` xn

If you look at the example breakdown, the concatenation foldr is equivalent to:

"a" ++ ("b" ++ ("c" ++ ""))

And for foldl, it would be equivalent to:

(("" ++ "a") ++ "b") ++ "c"

For string concatenation, these are the same.


For subtraction however,

1 - (2 - (3 - 0))

Gives a different result than:

((0 - 1) - 2) - 3
7

Actually foldr (-) 0 [1..5] equals 3, because it's:

(1 - (2 - (3 - (4 - (5 - 0))))

The answer to this question is in the type of foldr function:

foldr :: Foldable t => (a -> b -> b) -> b -> t a -> b

As we see, (a -> b -> b) function has iterated element as the first argument and accumulator as the second one. That's why with foldr (++) "" ["a", "b", "c"] we have:

("a" ++ ("b" ++ ("c" ++ "")))
  • Very important point about the argument order. They are ordered such that the expanded expression has its arguments in the same order as the list, and the accumulator need not be the same type as the list entries. For instance, any (>5) xs can be expressed as foldr False (\v a -> if v>5 then True else a) xs. – Yann Vernier Aug 28 '18 at 9:31
2

Seen symbolically as a "translation" of the fold, 0-1-2-3-4-5 by itself is ill-defined. The order of operations must be specified.

In fact, whatever the operator, the order is

foldl (-) 0 [1..5] = ((((0 - 1) - 2) - 3) - 4) - 5    -- = -15

foldr (-) 0 [1..5] = 1 - (2 - (3 - (4 - (5 - 0))))    -- = 3

For the (++) though, both orderings result in the same result, when "" is used in place of 0.

  • 0-1-2-3-4-5 is defined; it's sum [0, -1, -2, -3, -4, -5], which means the binary - is left associative (:i (-) says infixl 6 -). Thus it matches the foldl case here. – Yann Vernier Aug 28 '18 at 9:17
  • 1
    of course, there's no question about it. What I meant was that with the - seen symbolically, as the stand-in for any possible operator, it is not fully defined without specifying the associativity (as the fixity declaration in Haskell does). – Will Ness Aug 28 '18 at 10:17

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