1

I don`t know the easy way how to remove text from text by range in JS.

I read a lot of questions there, but no one help me.

I dont want to user replace, etc. Just remove.

Example:

jakxxxjakxxx => remove 4 - 6 returns jakjakxxx

jakxxxjakxxx => remove 0 - 2 returns xxxjakxxx

Is there any function is standard js library?

  • 1
    Removing is replacing. Strings are immutable, so to remove characters you derive a new string with the characters that you want removed from the original string replaced with empty strings. Do you want to remove based on indices, or do you "know" what you want to replace (in which case the .replace() function will work just fine for your needs). – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Aug 27 '18 at 17:24
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    I dont want to user replace, etc. Just remove. So, if I replace your car with nothing, have I not removed your car? Also, where is the code you've tried? – Scott Marcus Aug 27 '18 at 17:24
  • You are describing str.substring... – AmmoPT Aug 27 '18 at 17:25
  • So, then what result will be when I call replace "xxx" by "" - empty string – hiacliok Aug 27 '18 at 17:25
  • 2
    @hiacliok .replace() replaces exactly where you tell it to, so if you think it's doing it wrong, show the code you tried and explain why you think that's wrong (and remember that JS starts counting positions at 0, like a lot of other languages. If you start at '3', that's the fourth index, and every JS programmer expects that. Making '4' the fourth index would be extremely bad practice). It sounds like what you're most likely looking for can be done with replace() and passing a replacement function, which is the lesser-known way to invoke .replace() in Javascript. – Mike 'Pomax' Kamermans Aug 27 '18 at 17:27
3

You could filter the letters.

function remove(string, from, to) {
    return [...string].filter((_, i) => i < from || i > to).join('');
}

console.log(remove('jakxxxjakxxx', 4, 6)); // jakjakxxx 
console.log(remove('jakxxxjakxxx', 0, 2)); // xxxjakxxx
                    012345678901

Or slice the string.

function remove(string, from, to) {
    return string.slice(0, from) + string.slice(to);
}

console.log(remove('jakxxxjakxxx', 4, 6)); // jakjakxxx 
console.log(remove('jakxxxjakxxx', 0, 2)); // xxxjakxxx

3

I'd offer a different solution than Nina's, here it is with 2 substring calls:

function remove(string, from, to) {
  return string.substring(0, from) + string.substring(to);
}

No need to transform into an array iterating the characters.

Note: Remember that we start counting from 0.

0

Based on your follow-up in the comments: use .substring() and .replace(), remembering that Javascript (like almost every other language) uses offsets starting at 0, not 1, and reading the substring function documentation to make sure that its arguments are provided as "start position, inclusive, end position, exclusive":

var a = "jakxxxjakxxx";
var b = "jakxxxjakxxx";

var c = a.replace(a.substring(3,6)); // => "jakjakxxx"
var d = b.replace(a.substring(0,3)); // => "xxxjakxxx"

Done. House that in its own function with argument rewriting if you use it a lot, but to achieve what you want to achieve, you just need two built-ins, but the one thing you should not be doing is trying to make this work with your own personal choice of which numbers indicate which index in a string or a slice: work with the JS conventions, don't bake anti-patterns into your source code.

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