0

Consider the following set of lines as a text file:

START This is a 
sample paragraph that has special characters like new lines

spaces, tabs, quotes "abc", equals =, angular brackets <abc>, front slash / and might contain the starting string that should be ignored
START and 

END

START

dfgfah

END

Using sed, I want to replace text between only the first occurrence of START and the first occurrence of END.

The result that I am expecting is like:

START new_text END

START

dfgfah

END

What I tried is like:

sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/START.*END/START New text END/' sample.txt>sample_2.txt

But the result was:

START New text End

How do I replace until the first occurrence of END?

  • This would be trivial with Perl: perl -0777 -pe 's/START.*?END/START New text END/s' – melpomene Aug 28 '18 at 6:42
  • Is perl supported on all flavors of linux? It has to be supported on SuSe, IBM NIX,and few other flavors – sureshcskkumar Aug 28 '18 at 9:36
  • Perl runs on pretty much all operating systems (including Linux and more esoteric stuff like HP/UX, VMS, etc). I don't know whether it is part of the standard OS install, however. – melpomene Aug 28 '18 at 11:41
1

With GNU sed:

sed '0,/START/{:a;/END/!{N;ba};s/.*/START new_text END/;}' file
  • 0,/START/: from first occurrence of START
  • :a;/END/!{N;ba}: append new lines to the pattern space until END is found
  • when above loops ends, replace merged lines with START new_text END
0

You can use : do define labels and b to branch to the label in sed scripts.

The option -n tells sed to print no lines automatically. Instead you can print the lines with the p command.

In the following example the :head loop loops over the part up to the first START and the :tail loop loops over the text after the first END. The :start loop loops over the part between the first START and END.

The :head and :tail loops print (p) every line (n) and quit, when they reach the end of the file ($q). The :start loop does not print and just ignores the content. When the END is found, the new text gets inserted (s) and printed (p).

cat <<EOF |
START This is a 
sample paragraph that has special characters like new lines

spaces, tabs, quotes "abc", equals =, angular brackets <abc>, front slash / and might contain the starting string that should be ignored
START and 

END

START

dfgfah

END
EOF
sed -n '
:head
/^START/{
  :start
  n
  $q
  /^END/{
    s/^/START New text /
    p
    n
    :tail
    p
    $q
    n
    b tail
  }
  b start
}
p
$q
n
b head
'

The above technique is taken from the first example of The Geek Stuff's sed tutorial.

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