2

In Python 3, it is standard procedure to make a class an iterable and iterator at the same time by defining both the __iter__ and __next__ methods. But I have problems to wrap my head around this. Take this example which creates an iterator that produces only even numbers:

class EvenNumbers:

    def __init__(self, max_):
        self.max_ = max_

    def __iter__(self):
        self.n = 0
        return self

    def __next__(self):
        if self.n <= self.max:
            result = 2 * self.n
            self.n += 1
            return result

        raise StopIteration

instance = EvenNumbers(4)

for entry in instance:
    print(entry)

To my knowledge (correct me if I'm wrong), when I create the loop, an iterator is created by calling something like itr = iter(instance) which internally calls the __iter__ method. This is expected to return an iterator object (which the instance is due to defining __next__ and therefore I can just return self). To get an element from it, next(itr) is called until the exception is raised.

My question here is now: if and how can __iter__ and __next__ be separated, so that the content of the latter function is defined somewhere else? And when could this be useful? I know that I have to change __iter__ so that it returns an iterator.

Btw the idea to do this comes from this site (LINK), which does not state how to implement this.

  • 2
    Even when you seperate them, the one that implements __next__ also has to implement __iter__ (returning itself). – L3viathan Aug 28 '18 at 10:59
9

It sounds like you're confusing iterators and iterables. Iterables have an __iter__ method which returns an iterator. Iterators have a __next__ method which returns either their next value or raise a StopIteration. Now in python, it is stated that iterators are also iterables (but not visa versa) and that iter(iterator) is iterator so an iterator, itr, should return only itself from it's __iter__ method.

Iterators are required to have an __iter__() method that returns the iterator object itself so every iterator is also iterable and may be used in most places where other iterables are accepted

In code:

class MyIter:
   def __iter__(self):
       return self

   def __next__(self):
       # actual iterator logic

If you want to make a custom iterator class, the easiest way is to inherit from collections.abc.Iterator which you can see defines __iter__ as above (it is also a subclass of collections.abc.Iterable). Then all you need is

class MyIter(collections.abc.Iterator):
    def __next__(self):
        ...

There is of course a much easier way to make an iterator, and thats with a generator function

def fib():
    a = 1
    b = 1
    yield a
    yield b
    while True:
        b, a = a + b, b
        yield b

list(itertools.takewhile(lambda x: x < 100, fib()))
# --> [1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89]

Just for reference, this is (simplified) code for an abstract iterator and iterable

from abc import ABC, abstractmethod

class Iterable(ABC):

    @abstractmethod
    def __iter__(self):
        'Returns an instance of Iterator'
        pass

class Iterator(Iterable, ABC):

    @abstractmethod
    def __next__(self):
        'Return the next item from the iterator. When exhausted, raise StopIteration'
        pass

    # overloads Iterable.__iter__
    def __iter__(self):
        return self
  • Thank you, but I need some clarification: if I define __iter__ in a class, I tell the interpreter that it is an iterable. When I return self in this method, then I return the instance and not an iterator object, right? But according to the docs this should be an iterator object and this confuses me. – DocDriven Aug 28 '18 at 11:29
  • 1
    If you define __iter__ then the object is iterable. If you define __next__ the object is an iterator. On iterator objects, you should set __iter__ to return the object itself, which as I said, is an iterator. iterators are iterables that when iterated over (e.g. for loop), return themselves. – FHTMitchell Aug 28 '18 at 11:53
1

I think I have grasped the concept now, even if I do not fully understand the passage from the documentation by @FHTMitchell. I came across an example on how to separate the two methods and wanted to document this.

What I found is a very basic tutorial that clearly distinguishes between the iterable and the iterator (which is the cause of my confusion).

Basically, you define your iterable first as a separate class:

class EvenNumbers:

    def __init__(self, max_):
        self.max = max_

    def __iter__(self):
        self.n = 0
        return EvenNumbersIterator(self)

The __iter__ method only requires an object that has a __next__ method defined. Therefore, you can do this:

class EvenNumbersIterator:

    def __init__(self, source):
        self.source = source       

    def __next__(self):
        if self.source.n <= self.source.max:
            result = 2 * self.source.n
            self.source.n += 1
            return result
        else:
            raise StopIteration

This separates the iterator part from the iterable class. It now makes sense that if I define __next__ within the iterable class, I have to return the reference to the instance itself as it basically does 2 jobs at once.

  • Your iterator isn't a valid iterator (or at least breaks conventions and could lead to confusing errors) since iterators must also be iterable as discussed in my answer. You either need to inherit from collections.abc.Iterator or define def __iter__(self): return self. – FHTMitchell Aug 29 '18 at 9:46

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