121

I am creating a NuGet package for a C# class library, and I would like to include generated Xml Documentation with the library. This is my nuspec file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<package>
  <metadata>
    <id>MyLibrary</id>
    <version>1.0.0.0</version>
    <authors>John Nelson</authors>
    <language>en-US</language>
    <description>A C# class library</description>
  </metadata>
  <files>
    <file src="..\..\build\MyLibrary.dll" target="lib\Net40" />
    <file src="..\..\build\MyLibrary.xml" target="lib\Net40" />
  </files>
</package>

When I build the package with this command:

nuget pack MyLibrary.nuspec

It generates an error. If I remove the line:

<file src="..\..\build\MyLibrary.xml" target="lib\Net40" />

NuGet.exe successfully creates the nupkg. I can even unzip the package, and verify that the contents are correct. What am I doing wrong? Should the xml file go into a different target directory?

3
  • What command do you use to build the package? May 14, 2015 at 15:43
  • @ColonelPanic updated question with command and link to docs. May 15, 2015 at 14:26
  • Thanks John. I am packaging a csproj directly nuget pack library.csproj (I don't have a nuspec), but the fix works the same. May 15, 2015 at 14:34

2 Answers 2

110

The problem was that I didn't check "Generate Xml Documentation" for the build configuration I was using. That nuspec is correct.

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2
  • 6
    Good to know. I was trying my hand at using the GUI to create a package, and it was trying to get me to move the XML file to the content folder instead of lib. Didn't seem right, so I wanted to get a second opinion. Glad you had this post. :-)
    – Mike Loux
    Jan 1, 2012 at 15:41
  • How do I load the generated file from code so that I can read it? I suppose I would need to know the value in this setting, and I would also need to know the path of the project. I've tried using asm.Location and this gets me inside of bin\Debug\netcoreapp etc. Nov 23, 2021 at 0:25
29

In .NET Core/Standard you can do this by editing the project XML file, for example:

<PropertyGroup>
    <TargetFramework>netstandard2.0</TargetFramework>
    <GenerateDocumentationFile>true</GenerateDocumentationFile>
</PropertyGroup>

<PropertyGroup>
    <DocumentationFile>bin\$(Configuration)\$(TargetFramework)\$(AssemblyName).xml</DocumentationFile>
</PropertyGroup>

This will output the documentation as an XML file next to your output assembly.

EDIT: As a side note once you enable GenerateDocumentationFile you will probably get lots of warnings on your public methods for not having added full documentation tags. If you want to disable these warnings simply add in the PropertyGroup:

<NoWarn>$(NoWarn);1591</NoWarn>
2
  • 5
    <GenerateDocumentationFile> results in a <DocumentationFile> already, so I think only one of both is required, see: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/codedoc
    – Kapé
    Jan 10, 2020 at 10:01
  • 1
    Specifiying <DocumentationFile> yourself just allows you to output the file where ever you want. If you dont specify it I think it literally puts it in the path I have provided above.
    – bytedev
    Jan 10, 2020 at 10:14

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