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I'am trying to learn how to make SuperMario in JavaScript from here Can someone explain flow of the below function LoadImage ?

function loadImage(url) {
        return new  Promise(resolve => {
            const image = new Image();
            image.addEventListener('load', () => {
                resolve(image);
            });
            image.src = url; 
        });
}

const canvas = document.getElementById('screen');
const context = canvas.getContext('2d');

context.fillRect(0,0,50,50);

loadImage('/img/tiles.png')
.then(image=>{
    context.drawImage(image,0,0);  // the function LoadImage returns a Promise with image object(which is  a constant)
// as parameter and if the promise is fulfilled then the image is drawn. 
/
});

EDIT

I do understand how to use => operator. Which is used to make length of functions smaller.

image.addEventListener('load', () => {
                resolve(image);

the above line means that the promise is fulfilled when image is loaded. So does this mean that the following line is executed and then the event listener is waiting for the image to be downloaded in client browser ?

image.scr = url;

The flow of the below function is a little fuzzy to me

function loadImage(url) {
        return new  Promise(resolve => {
            const image = new Image();
            image.addEventListener('load', () => {
                resolve(image);
            });
            image.src = url; 
        });

EDIT 2:

Okay, this was a stupid post. And yup as the IMAGE from url is loaded in the image object then Event listener fires up the resolve().

3
  • 1
    Please add to your question what you think the code does as well as what particular part of the code you don't understand. As it stands right now, your question is too broad per the meta: “Explain X to me” questions: How to react?.
    – zero298
    Aug 28 '18 at 14:02
  • Alright i understand you. I've edited the post and tried to explain my problem best as i can. Aug 28 '18 at 14:35
  • 1
    Which is used to make length of functions smaller. — That isn't what it is for. It binds this.
    – Quentin
    Aug 28 '18 at 14:53
54

The code you are showing introduces an asynchronous primitive, Promise, which can be passed around and used to access a resource that hasn't been populated yet.

In this case, you want an Image that is fully loaded and has image data that you can use. However, you can't access the image data until a network request finishes that would fetch the image data.

For example, this won't work:

const img = new Image();
img.src = "example.com/house.jpg";
ctx.drawImage(img, 0, 0); // img isn't done loading yet

Instead, we have to wait until the loading is done. There are a lot of ways to do that but the most common conventions are to use, callbacks, Promises, or async/await.

The method that you have shown combines callbacks and Promises (out of necessity).

Let's break down the code:

/**
 * Load an image from a given URL
 * @param {String} url The URL of the image resource
 * @returns {Promise<Image>} The loaded image
 */
function loadImage(url) {
  /*
   * We are going to return a Promise which, when we .then
   * will give us an Image that should be fully loaded
   */
  return new Promise(resolve => {
    /*
     * Create the image that we are going to use to
     * to hold the resource
     */
    const image = new Image();
    /*
     * The Image API deals in even listeners and callbacks
     * we attach a listener for the "load" event which fires
     * when the Image has finished the network request and
     * populated the Image with data
     */
    image.addEventListener('load', () => {
      /*
       * You have to manually tell the Promise that you are
       * done dealing with asynchronous stuff and you are ready
       * for it to give anything that attached a callback
       * through .then a realized value.  We do that by calling
       * resolve and passing it the realized value
       */
      resolve(image);
    });
    /*
     * Setting the Image.src is what starts the networking process
     * to populate an image.  After you set it, the browser fires
     * a request to get the resource.  We attached a load listener
     * which will be called once the request finishes and we have
     * image data
     */
    image.src = url;
  });
}

/*
 * To use this we call the loadImage function and call .then
 * on the Promise that it returns, passing a function that we
 * want to receive the realized Image
 */
loadImage("example.com/house.jpg").then(houseImage => {
  ctx.drawImage(houseImage, 0, 0);
});


In all honesty though, the loadImage function could be a little bit more robust since it doesn't handle errors right now. Consider the following enhancement:

const loadImage = (url) => new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  const img = new Image();
  img.addEventListener('load', () => resolve(img));
  img.addEventListener('error', (err) => reject(err));
  img.src = url;
});

loadImage("example.com/house.jpg")
  .then(img => console.log(`w: ${img.width} | h: ${img.height}`))
  .catch(err => console.error(err));

4
  • 7
    The way i framed my question was unreadable. I didn't expect any answers but you sir took some time out of you life to Answer my question. I've gained new knowledge today. Thank you. Aug 28 '18 at 16:11
  • 3
    That's a comprehensive answer. Well done. One small note though, in img.addEventListener("error", err => reject(err)); no need for the arrow func, img.addEventListener("error", reject); is enough.
    – Kaiido
    Aug 29 '18 at 3:56
  • If i use this code to add image backgrounds in my page, will this increase efficiency of my page
    – Ankit
    Nov 23 '19 at 15:15
  • @ankit I would just let the CSS background image property do it. There would probably no significant difference one way or the other.
    – zero298
    Nov 23 '19 at 21:44

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