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The question is simple: what is lifetime of that functor object that is automatically generated for me by the C++ compiler when I write a lambda-expression?

I did a quick search, but couldn't find a satisfactory answer. In particular, if I pass the lambda somewhere, and it gets remembered there, and then I go out of scope, what's going to happen once my lambda is called later and tries to access my stack-allocated, but no longer alive, captured variables? Or does the compiler prevent such situation in some way? Or what?

  • I'm guessing you either get garbage or a segfualt? – the_drow Mar 5 '11 at 23:21
  • 2
    Ok, so the answer is "just don't do it"? This idea did occur to me, but... Don't do WHAT exactly? Don't remember function pointers? Or don't pass function pointers to functions? (that's the whole point, isn't it?) Or don't use lambdas at all? In other words, what is the intended use for lambdas? I mean, besides using them in calls to STL aggregate/iterate functions as is written over and over in every example. – Fyodor Soikin Mar 5 '11 at 23:25
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Depends on how you capture your variables. If you capture them by reference ([&]) and they go out of scope, the references will be invalid, just like normal references. Capture them by value ([=]) if you want to make sure they outlife their scope.

  • "Depends on how you capture your variables. If you capture them by reference ([&]) and they go out of scope, the references will be invalid, just like normal references.": Why is this allowed in the first place then? – Giorgio Feb 1 '13 at 11:46
  • For when they won't go out of scope before being used. – R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 1 '13 at 12:03
  • All the same reason normal references are allowed. – Puppy Feb 1 '13 at 12:03
  • @Giorgio because what is the alternative? Making C++ a garbage-collected language? – jalf Feb 1 '13 at 12:06
  • @jalf, not, but one could forbid returning a lambda that contains captured variables by reference because this is obviously incorrect and can be detected by statical analysis. – Giorgio Feb 1 '13 at 12:19

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