13

My question is different with the one identified. Obviously I have called "BeginErrorReadLine" method (I mark it in the code below).

I want to parse the result produced by Handle


Command line

When run in a command line environment, it will output something like:

> handle64 -p [PID]

 

Nthandle v4.11 - Handle viewer

Copyright (C) 1997-2017 Mark Russinovich

Sysinternals - www.sysinternals.com

 

  10: File     C:\Windows

  1C: File     C:\Windows\SysWOW64

[PID] is any running process ID

The output is seperated.

First 5 lines (include empty lines) go to the standard error, last 2 lines go to the standard output.

So I can strip the header by redirecting:

> handle64 -p [PID] 2>nul

  10: File     C:\Windows

  1C: File     C:\Windows\SysWOW64


Winform application

Then I try to implement this command in a C# winform application:

Stream streamOut, streamErr;

var p = Process.Start(new ProcessStartInfo
{
    FileName = "handle64.exe",
    Arguments = "-p [PID]",
    CreateNoWindow = true,
    UseShellExecute = false,
    RedirectStandardOutput = true,
    RedirectStandardError = true,
});

p.OutputDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
{
    streamOut.Write("Output => " + e.Data);
};

p.ErrorDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
{
    streamErr.Write("Error => " + e.Data);
};

p.BeginOutputReadLine();
p.BeginErrorReadLine(); // !!!
p.WaitForExit();

Then I find everything go to the standard output.


Question

Ok, I can seperate the header and the body by code.

The question is why the program's output behaves different between the 2 environments?

Can I make the result in the winform application behaves like it in the command line?


Update

For Damien's comment, I try to run the program via 'cmd', unfortunately I get the same result:

var p = Process.Start(new ProcessStartInfo
{
    FileName = "cmd",
    Arguments = "/C handle64.exe -p [PID]",
    CreateNoWindow = true,
    UseShellExecute = false,
    RedirectStandardOutput = true,
    RedirectStandardError = true,
});

...

In output window:

Output =>

Output => Nthandle v4.11 - Handle viewer

Output => Copyright (C) 1997-2017 Mark Russinovich

Output => Sysinternals - www.sysinternals.com

Output =>

Output =>   10: File     C:\Windows

Output =>   1C: File     C:\Windows\SysWOW64

Error =>

  • Why do you think the output should be separated in your program if you finally write everything into the same stream ? – Dmytro Mukalov Aug 30 '18 at 4:53
  • @Dmytro Not my program, but theirs, called "Handle". you can download it via the link. I just run it in my program. so the stream is written by that one. I think the same program usually writes message to the same stream. – shingo Aug 30 '18 at 5:01
  • I'm asking actually about your program which does Trace.Writeline for both error and output messages. – Dmytro Mukalov Aug 30 '18 at 5:04
  • 2
    I'm almost certain that if your description is accurate, then it's a decision being made by the target application. It's possible to determine if you're actually attached to an interactive console (though not terribly easy in .NET) and to use that to suddenly decide "hey, I'm going to just send everything to standard output" if you're not. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Aug 30 '18 at 6:05
  • 1
    What happens if you replace handle64 program with another program with known result? For, example, C++ cout << "StandardOutput" << endl; cerr << "StandardError" << endl; Maybe handle64 program contains some tricks as mentioned by @Damien_The_Unbeliever. – Alex F Sep 3 '18 at 6:06
2
+50

This is just a sample to illustrate the problem I alluded to in my comments. It's not a fix since I don't believe there is a trivial way to fix this. I've created Main in my scratch program (called PlayAreaCSCon). If it's called with no parameters, it's acting a way similar to what I suspect Handle64.exe is doing. When called with a parameter, it contains code similar to your own, but it then launches a copy of itself with no parameters:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.IO;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace PlayAreaCSCon
{
    class Program
    {
        [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
        static extern IntPtr GetConsoleWindow();
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            if (args.Length == 0)
            {
                Console.Out.WriteLine("Hello");
                if (GetConsoleWindow() == IntPtr.Zero)
                {
                    Console.Out.WriteLine("No Console window");
                }
                else
                {
                    Console.Error.WriteLine("We have a console window");
                }
            }
            else
            {
                Process p = Process.Start(new ProcessStartInfo
                {
                    FileName = "PlayAreaCSCon.exe",
                    Arguments = "",
                    CreateNoWindow = true,
                    UseShellExecute = false,
                    RedirectStandardOutput = true,
                    RedirectStandardError = true,
                });

                TextWriter streamOut = Console.Out;
                TextWriter streamErr = Console.Error;
                p.OutputDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
                {
                    streamOut.WriteLine("Output => " + e.Data);
                };

                p.ErrorDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
                {
                    streamErr.WriteLine("Error => " + e.Data);
                };

                p.BeginOutputReadLine();
                p.BeginErrorReadLine(); // !!!
                p.WaitForExit();
            }
        }
    }
}

In a command prompt, I have the following session:

C:\Dev\PlayAreaCSCon\PlayAreaCSCon\bin\Debug>PlayAreaCSCon.exe
Hello
We have a console window

C:\Dev\PlayAreaCSCon\PlayAreaCSCon\bin\Debug>PlayAreaCSCon.exe a
Error =>
Output => Hello
Output => No Console window
Output =>

So even here, if Handle64.exe is calling GetConsoleWindow or any morally equivalent function, it can detect that it's not connected to a console and exhibit different behaviour. The only way you might let it get a console window would be to set CreateNoWindow to false, which I gather you probably wouldn't want to do.

Since Handle64 is closed source it's difficult to confirm that this is the specific check it's performing either. There's no non-trivial fix to this from the calling side.

3

Not the answer of your question, but just a suggestion to achieve what you are trying do (i.e only get handle information in Winform application):

handle tool has -nobanner switch, you can use that to skip copyright message information.

handle64.exe -pid 11624 -nobanner
2

As stated by Damien: CreateNoWindow = false,

Let it create the window the immediately hide it. We could create it offscreen, but it would still show on the taskbar.

Note: this code may be no better than letting the Window appear and disappear naturally.

At the top of the class add:

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
static extern bool ShowWindow(IntPtr hWnd, int nCmdShow);

Then your code becomes:

var p = Process.Start(new ProcessStartInfo
{
    FileName = "cmd",
    Arguments = "/C handle64.exe -p [PID]",
    CreateNoWindow = false,
    UseShellExecute = false,
    RedirectStandardOutput = true,
    RedirectStandardError = true,
});
p.WaitForInputIdle();
IntPtr windowHandle = p.MainWindowHandle;
if(windowHandle == 0) throw new Exception("This did not work");
// use win32 API's to hide window (May still flicker)
ShowWindow(windowHandle,0);
// ...

I am unable to test this, since I am only running Linux at the moment.
If the exception doesn't fire, you may see a flicker of a window, but you should have the proper output.

The other way I know of doing this involves inserting handlers into the Win32 message pump and respond to the specific process telling it what it needs to know to think it has a proper window when it does not. I will not publicly post any code related to this technique. Any errors would cause Windows to become unstable.

0

I made some changes to your code:

Stream streamOut, streamErr;

var p = Process.Start(new ProcessStartInfo
{
    FileName = "handle64.exe",
    Arguments = "-p [PID]",
    CreateNoWindow = true,
    UseShellExecute = false,
    RedirectStandardOutput = true,
    RedirectStandardInput = true, // even if no writing to std::in, still need this
    RedirectStandardError = true,
});

p.OutputDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
{
    streamOut.Write("Output => " + e.Data);
};
p.BeginOutputReadLine();

p.ErrorDataReceived += (sender, e) =>
{
    streamErr.Write("Error => " + e.Data);
};

p.BeginErrorReadLine(); 

p.WaitForExit();
p.StandardInput.Close(); // call this before WaitForExit
p.WaitForExit();

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