5

Reading from DATA via the typical slurp works. Trying to use DATA as a filehandle on which I can do a seek does not work. Is anyone able to point me the to the obvious mistake I must be making?

Code:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

if ($ARGV[0] eq 'seek' ) {
    my $log_fh = \*DATA;
    $log_fh->seek(64,0);
    print "\n-- 64 --\n",join ("", <$log_fh> );
} else {
    while (<DATA>) {
        print $_;
    }
}

exit;

__DATA__
01234567890123456789
1234567890123456789
1234567890123456789
12
X <- That X is the 64th char in
this file.
Y <- That Y is the 106th char in this file.
junk
more junk.
bye!

$ perl file_from_data.pl slurp
01234567890123456789
1234567890123456789
1234567890123456789
12
X <- That X is the 64th char in
this file.
Y <- That Y is the 106th char in this file.
junk
more junk.
bye!

Running the while() loop:

$ perl file_from_data.pl slurp
01234567890123456789
1234567890123456789
1234567890123456789
12
X <- That X is the 64th char in
this file.
Y <- That Y is the 106th char in this file.
junk
more junk.
bye!

Running the seek(), it appears to not start at DATA but the start of the script:

$ perl file_from_data.pl seek

-- 64 --
'seek' ) {
    my $log_fh = \*DATA;
    $log_fh->seek(64,0);
    print "\n-- 64 --\n",join ("", <$log_fh> );
} else {
    while (<DATA>) {
        print $_;
    }
}

exit;

__DATA__
01234567890123456789
1234567890123456789
1234567890123456789
12
X <- That X is the 64th char in
this file.
Y <- That Y is the 106th char in this file.
junk
more junk.
bye!

This is an old Perl:

$ perl -v

This is perl 5, version 16, subversion 3 (v5.16.3) built for x86_64-linux- 
thread-multi
4
  • 5
    DATA is seekable. Store the result of tell(DATA) when the script starts and treat that as the first byte of the DATA stream.
    – mob
    Aug 30, 2018 at 20:25
  • Avoid DATA if you need it seekable; use a separate file instead. Is this for a module you are distributing?
    – ysth
    Aug 30, 2018 at 20:43
  • For what it's worth, take a look at metacpan.org/pod/Data::Section::Simple. Not exactly what you describe you want to do, but maybe useful anyway.
    – simbabque
    Aug 31, 2018 at 8:50
  • @simbabque - I will keep this in my League of Extraordinary CPAN Modules. :-) Thank you.
    – mpersico
    Sep 1, 2018 at 13:36

1 Answer 1

7

Running the seek(), it appears to not start at DATA but the start of the script

I don't think you're making any mistake at all. That's exactly what happens. DATA is a filehandle that is open on your source file. Before your first read() from that filehandle, the file pointer is positioned immediately after the __DATA__ token in the file. But you can use seek() to move the file pointer to any position at all in the file.

I guess it would be harder to implement a "special case" filehandle that wasn't able to move back before its initial position.

6
  • 2
    OP can just use SEEK_CUR (instead of SEEK_SET) as the whence.
    – mwp
    Aug 30, 2018 at 20:10
  • Duh - special semantics. So I should while() until DATA, get that position, then all seeks are relative to that. Sounds like something that is either on CPAN or should be. Thank you.
    – mpersico
    Aug 30, 2018 at 20:11
  • The other thing to do is: my $log_fh = \*main::DATA; my $whence = $log_fh->tell(); $log_fh->seek($whence + 64,0); print "\n-- 64 --\n",join ("", <$log_fh> );
    – mpersico
    Aug 30, 2018 at 20:18
  • 4
    @mpersico, Don't search for __DATA__. You're already positioned there. Use SEEK_CUR to move forwards 64 bytes. If you need to seek back to the start, use tell to note the start position (before doing any seeking or reading)
    – ikegami
    Aug 30, 2018 at 20:53
  • @ikegami - look up to the third comment. :-)
    – mpersico
    Sep 1, 2018 at 13:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.