1

I noticed that rand(x) where x is an integer gives me an array of random floating points. I want to know how I can generate an array of random float type variables within a certain range. I tried using a range as follows:

rand(.4:.6, 5, 5)

And I get:

 0.4  0.4  0.4  0.4  0.4
 0.4  0.4  0.4  0.4  0.4
 0.4  0.4  0.4  0.4  0.4
 0.4  0.4  0.4  0.4  0.4
 0.4  0.4  0.4  0.4  0.4

How can I get a range instead of the lowest number in the range?

8

Perhaps a bit more elegant, as you actually want to sample from a Uniform distribution, you can use the Distribution package:

julia> using Distributions
julia> rand(Uniform(0.4,0.6),5,5)
5×5 Array{Float64,2}:
 0.547602  0.513855  0.414453  0.511282  0.550517
 0.575946  0.520085  0.564056  0.478139  0.48139
 0.409698  0.596125  0.477438  0.53572   0.445147
 0.567152  0.585673  0.53824   0.597792  0.594287
 0.549916  0.56659   0.502528  0.550121  0.554276

The same method then applies from sampling from other well-known or user-defined distributions (just give the distribution as the first parameter to rand())

3

You need a step parameter:

rand(.4:.1:.6, 5, 5)

The .1 will provide a step for your range which is necessary for floating point numbers and not necessary for incrementing by 1. The issue is that it will assume 1 regardless of implicit precision. If you need the increment more precise than do the following:

rand(.4:.0001:.6, 5, 5)

This will give you a result that looks similar to:

 0.4587  0.557   0.586   0.4541  0.4686
 0.4545  0.4789  0.4921  0.4451  0.4212
 0.4373  0.5056  0.4229  0.5167  0.5504
 0.5494  0.4068  0.5316  0.4378  0.5495
 0.4368  0.4384  0.5265  0.5995  0.5231
  • 1
    I like how this highlights the initial problem with your code but the other answer actually gives the recommended way of doing it. – niczky12 Aug 31 '18 at 7:59
0

You can do it with

julia> map(x->0.4+x*(0.6-0.4),rand(5,5))
5×5 Array{Float64,2}:
 0.455445  0.475007  0.518734  0.463064  0.400925
 0.509436  0.527338  0.566976  0.482812  0.501817
 0.405967  0.563425  0.574607  0.502343  0.483075
 0.50317   0.482894  0.54584   0.594157  0.528844
 0.50418   0.515788  0.5554    0.580199  0.505396

The general rule is

julia> map(  x -> start + x * (stop - start), rand(5,5)  )

where start is 0.4 and stop is 0.6

You can even generate a six sided dice this way by having x ranging from 1 to 7 that is 1 < x < 7 since the probability of x being exactly 1.0 or 7.0 is zero

julia> map(x->Integer(floor(1+x*(7-1))),rand(5,5))
5×5 Array{Int64,2}:
 2  6  6  3  2
 3  1  3  1  6
 5  4  6  1  5
 3  6  5  5  3
 3  4  3  5  4

or you can use

julia> rand(1:6,5,5)
5×5 Array{Int64,2}:
 3  6  3  5  5
 2  1  3  3  3
 1  5  4  1  5
 5  5  5  5  1
 3  2  1  5  6

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