10

When you create a new MFC application, the wizard creates the following block of code in almost every CPP file:

#ifdef _DEBUG
#define new DEBUG_NEW
#endif

and sometimes it also adds this:

#undef THIS_FILE
static char THIS_FILE[] = __FILE__;

I would like to remove this code from my CPP files if it is redundant. I am using an MFC app with C++/CLI on VS2008.

I have tried running in Debug after deleting this code from a CPP, and it seems to work fine. "new"ing variables work fine, there are no leaks, and ASSERT dialogs show the correct filename and jump to the offending line.

Can anyone tell me what it does and whether it's safe to delete it?

10

It is perfectly safe to delete this. It's a debugging aid; leaving it in will generate warnings in the output window of any memory leaks you have when the program exits.

  • Are you sure? VS2008 does still display a memory leak object dump after I've deleted the code block. Maybe this used to be the case in VC6 or something...? – demoncodemonkey Feb 6 '09 at 17:25
  • 2
    Sorry I just realised there's a subtlety to what you said - when the code is there the output window shows the filename and line containing the memory leak, as opposed to just showing that there is a memory leak. – demoncodemonkey Feb 6 '09 at 17:35
  • So that explains the first part of the generated code. What about the 2nd part? #undef THIS_FILE static char THIS_FILE[] = FILE; – demoncodemonkey Feb 6 '09 at 17:36
  • 2
    I believe THIS_FILE is what DEBUG_NEW uses to get the source filename that it uses for the leak report. – Mark Ransom Feb 6 '09 at 18:59
  • Yeah that does sound right, but it's a bit weird that the THIS_FILE code is only present in some source files and not others. Thanks for helping me figure it out :) – demoncodemonkey Feb 8 '09 at 0:33
1

On Microsoft Visual C++ 2010, I can remove the whole code and put just one #define NEW DEBUG_NEW in a header, and I still got the right memory leak reports, e.g.

Detected memory leaks!
Dumping objects ->
f:\dd\vctools\vc7libs\ship\atlmfc\src\mfc\strcore.cpp(156) : {7508} normal block at 0x029B9598, 54 bytes long.
 Data: <                > E4 B8 C9 00 12 00 00 00 12 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 
f:\dd\vctools\vc7libs\ship\atlmfc\src\mfc\strcore.cpp(156) : {7501} normal block at 0x029B94A8, 28 bytes long.
 Data: <                > E4 B8 C9 00 05 00 00 00 05 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 
f:\source\agent\agent\deviceid.cpp(21) : {7500} normal block at 0x029CDFC0, 8 bytes long.
 Data: <        > A8 95 9B 02 B8 94 9B 02 
f:\dd\vctools\vc7libs\ship\atlmfc\src\mfc\strcore.cpp(156) : {6786} normal block at 0x029C0D88, 160 bytes long.
 Data: <        G       > E4 B8 C9 00 19 00 00 00 47 00 00 00 01 00 00 00 
f:\source\agent\sysinfo\sysinfo.cpp(27) : {6733} normal block at 0x029B84D8, 92 bytes long.
 Data: <                > 00 00 00 00 00 10 00 00 00 00 01 00 FF FF FE 7F 
Object dump complete.
  • 3
    No, you do not get the whole info. Note how the code you show only shows the leak in strcore.cpp which indicates that you leaked a CString object (or somesuch). With the correct DEBUG_NEW/THIS_FILE offset, it would also report the place in your code where you did the new – Martin Ba Nov 7 '12 at 18:17

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