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I have a Module AttrX::Mooish which implements some of attribute features of Moo/Moose frameworks (lazynes, trigger, etc.). I also wanted the module to be as transparent to the end user as possible meaning support for both private and public attributes. It works by replacing attribute's container with a Proxy and storing its value in external storage. It also means that all the type checking and coercion Perl6 was doing is now my responsibility. My target is to mimic the default behavior is much as possible. I.e. for the end user:

has MyClass @foo is mooish(...);

must work the same as it would without the trait applied. Unfortunately, the subject of type manipulations is so much complicated and ununified in the language core that the more problems I fix the more problems I get afterwards. For example:

my Str @a = <a b c>; my Str @b = [1,2,3]

Type check failed in assignment to @b; expected Str but got Int (1)

As expected.

my Str @a; say @a.WHAT

(Array[Str])

Sure.

my Array[Str] $a = ["a", "b", "c"];

Type check failed in assignment to $a; expected Array[Str] but got Array ($["a", "b", "c"])

Well....

my Array[Str] $a = <a b c>;

Type check failed in assignment to $a; expected Array[Str] but got List ($("a", "b", "c"))

Not even coercing List to Array!

No wonder that the final typecheck line in my trait code:

$coerced-value ~~ $attr.type

Fails here and there despite same values/types used in variable/attribute assignments work ok.

I have a question whith no hope of getting any positive answer to it: is there a single entry point used by the assignment operator which does all the coerce/typecheck? Ideally I would simply:

$value = coerce($value, $type); check-type($value, :type($attr.type), :name($attr.name))

I tried to trace down from the grammar, but haven't got enough spare time to complete this yet. Besides, it is mostly nqp which I don't know and can't really understand.

But since existance of such entry point(s) is unlikely I would like to ask for any advises related to this area. Like, for example, SmokeMachine on #perl6 provided me with a great idea of obtaining base type of a parametrized type using .^parents method.

So far, the biggest problems are with:

  1. To check if type is parametrized I can't use a single role or class to match against. So far the only approach I have is by finding if there is of method and testing its output. Unfortunately, if a class provides FALLBACK very unclear error message (the one about AUTOGEN) is produced. :no_fallback is desirable, but definite and subset types have their own find_method which doesn't support named parameters and I end up with another error message.
  2. If a prepare type-related attributes ($!coerce-type) in compose method of my trait role applied to the Attribute object (where actually the attributes are declared) I find them later at run-time unitialized. Guessing its something related to compose time. But wanna be sure if nothing is missed here.
  3. Is there any better way to perform type-check than $value ~~ $type?
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2019 update I deleted this answer shortly after I wrote it. It's a nanswer. It didn't directly address most of the issues raised in the question. Where it did, what I had to say was notably vague. But I just had cause to review it and have decided I may as well reinstate it for now (edited a bit to improve what usefulness I see in it). Perhaps Vadim will just delete the whole question but I'm thinking that perhaps instead it's a useful example of what digging deeply into the P6 metaprogramming guts can be like for those unfamiliar with it like Vadim and myself. Hopefully in years to come real answers will emerge.


(This is not an answer, not even close. It's just an exploratory comment responding to your question. It didn't quite fit in a comment. ;) It starts with stuff that probably doesn't belong on SO at all. But Perl folk are wont to do things the "wrong" way and we don't always write SO questions or answers as the broader community says we should. This can just be an exemplar of doing things "wrong" or at least doing "wrong" things.)


One thing that would be helpful to me (and perhaps others who haven't hung out wherever you hang out so don't know for sure what's driving you) would be to fill that in a bit. To wit my first comment:

I have a Module AttrX::Mooish

The Mooish module's Description says "This module is aiming at providing some functionality we're all missing from Moo/Moose. For now it implements laziness with accompanying methods. But more may come in the future.".

I can't tell from that and your question what's driving you to do this. Let me ask if your motives fit with one or all of the following somewhat contrived possibilities:

  1. you need this functionality this year if you're gonna code in P6 this year;

  2. you aim to bring this functionality to P6 even if it takes you a year;

  3. you want to learn P6 by taking on a worthy challenge for at most this year;

  4. you want to contribute to establishing P6 in 2019 and consider having pure P6 Moo like stuff available this year to be a big thing toward that;

  5. some combination of the above, perhaps with different timing parameters, or other motives.

A comment clarifying your motives might help direct responses to your questions. It would at least be interesting. :)

which implements some of attribute features of Moo/Moose frameworks (lazynes, trigger, etc.).

Have you tried using Moo directly via Inline::Perl5? I realize that you may not be interested in that as a final solution but it seems like it would be an incredibly useful exercise for the Perl 6 community and the Perl 5 community and the overall Perl community and you, no matter where you want to go with things.

Or, perhaps equally or even more interesting, Moxie. Moxie's readme says it has (experimental) laziness. I don't know about triggers. I could see Moxie becoming an important piece of the ground where P6 and P5 can strongly reunify over the next decade. To the degree I'm right, that angle might be interesting. And you'd then naturally bring together Stevan, Stefan, and yourself which could have interesting spin off effects for years to come.

I would have thought that going down this road will take you through some of the same territory as you're going over now but with much, much broader impact while still taking you toward a pure Perl 6 Mooish or Sixie or whatever.

Anyhow, food for thought.

I also wanted the module to be as transparent to the end user as possible meaning support for both private and public attributes.

(Moxie specifically notes its approach to private and public attributes.)

It works by replacing attribute's container with a Proxy

Aiui the existing implementation of Proxys suffers from repeated calls. So a read or write can happen several times where you might expect only one. Perhaps that's been fixed now but it definitely had that as an unexpected downside in recent years.

all the type checking and coercion Perl6 was doing is now my responsibility.

Is that an unwanted side-effect of the Proxy approach or do you need to get involved with that part so the Proxy approach just makes it easier to do what you need to do anyway?

My target is to mimic the default behavior is much as possible.

Forgive me for sounding negative again but that sounds horrible, unless your goal is just learning P6 and you plan to throw away the end result.

Unfortunately, the subject of type manipulations is so much complicated and ununified in the language core that the more problems I fix the more problems I get afterwards.

Well that just makes everything sound even worse than I already thought. Again, perhaps you're going deep down rabbit holes and you'd be well advised to climb out of them, come back to the sunlight, dust yourself off, and head off in a different direction?

For example:

my Array[Str] $a = ["a", "b", "c"];

Type check failed in assignment to $a; expected Array[Str] but got Array ($["a", "b", "c"])

In P6 think, that's perfectly cromulent behavior for a scalar assignment.

P6 typing is primarily nominal, driven by the names of types.

The name of the type of the object on the right is Array.

The name of the type constraint on the left is Array[Str].

P6 refuses to do a scalar (one thing) assignment of a value (an Array) that is nominally broader (more ambiguous/generic) than the variable's constraint (Array[Str]) because an Array value may not be compatible with Array[Str].

In contrast list assignment works:

my Str @a = ["a", "b", "c"];

This time the = is doing list assignment, i.e. individually assigning each of the elements on the right into an individual Scalar on the left -- which Scalar has a Str type constraint -- and each of those scalar assignments passes the individual scalar type check that it's a Str.

Returning to your other scalar assignment example:

my Array[Str] $a = <a b c>;

Type check failed in assignment to $a; expected Array[Str] but got List ($("a", "b", "c"))

Not even coercing List to Array!

This breaks P6 think even more.

An Array is narrower than a List so now you're doubly failing the type check.

Again, my Str @a = <a b c>; works.

No wonder that the final typecheck line in my trait code $coerced-value ~~ $attr.type Fails here and there despite same values/types used in variable/attribute assignments work ok.

I'm too tired as I write this to dig into what's going on there. Maybe you get an "aha" from what I've just written. I plan to take another look at the above tomorrow.

I have a question whith no hope of getting any positive answer to it: is there a single entry point used by the assignment operator which does all the coerce/typecheck?

Well I think there are two separate things going on.

First, type checking occurs on scalar assignment. = in a list (or array) assignment context turns into iterating over the elements of the receiving composite container and doing the type checks one Scalar at a time.

Second, the type checking guts seem a bit ad hoc, as you've noticed.

Ideally I would simply:

$value = coerce($value, $type);
check-type($value, :type($attr.type), :name($attr.name))

Well the key thing is whether $value is scalar or composite.

I tried to trace down from the grammar, but haven't got enough spare time to complete this yet. Besides, it is mostly nqp which I don't know and can't really understand.

It's almost entirely a simple subset of P6 as a language, so it ought to be easy, but yeah, I generally find it kinda wild and woolly.

To check if type is parametrized I can't use a single role or class to match against.

I think what you would need would be to call methods on the type's metaobject, something like .parameterized or somesuch. Hmm. ... Checkout P6 archetypes (and maybe nqp archetypes).

(But again, I suspect you're way off in the weeds with this whole approach, starting with the Proxy. And I think there would be tremendous value in you trying the route of using Moxie or Moo via IP5 first and see where that takes things.)

If a prepare type-related attributes ($!coerce-type) in compose method of my trait role applied to the Attribute object (where actually the attributes are declared) I find them later at run-time unitialized. Guessing its something related to compose time. But wanna be sure if nothing is missed here.

No comment. You're way down deep in the guts and I'm not at all convinced you want to be in those guts instead of some other guts.

Is there any better way to perform type-check than $value ~~ $type?

There are other ways. ~~ is the generic smart match operator which does a slow type check in some scenarios. One key question is whether you want to match sub-types, and/or roles, or just exact base type matches.


Hopefully that's some food for thought.

  • What started as a request for advise turns into a discussion. I'd move it to a mailing list if you don't mind. – Vadim Belman Aug 31 '18 at 21:47
  • I have posted my reply to perl6-users. BTW, I've got things works more-less to the level which is good for me. Only until I would hit another issue if this kind... Anyway, I think the matters I'm raising could be interesting to discuss and, perhaps, either I get the answers convincing me that things are the way they should be; or language would get a couple of rough edges smoothened. – Vadim Belman Sep 2 '18 at 0:30
  • What is related to archetypes: they don't allow to distinguish parametrized types from their base types. So far, only the presense of method of allows for easy distinction. But even checking for this method has some side effects when dealing with DefiniteHOW, SubsetHOW, or classes with FALLBACK method. But it's a minor stuff to be focused upon. – Vadim Belman Sep 2 '18 at 0:34
  • Hi @VadimBelman I've posted a bunch of emails to perl6.users but it looks like they've not gone through. I'll figure that out later and repost if need be but my point is that I'm following your lead. I was planning to cut/paste this answer to the list too and then delete it from here. Alternatively I can just leave it here. Do you care if I leave it? – raiph Sep 2 '18 at 16:51
  • It's totally up to you. I think this question could be sent to archive as soon as the thread on the mailing list is ended. – Vadim Belman Sep 2 '18 at 16:59

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