152

I have the following list created from a sorted csv

list1 = sorted(csv1, key=operator.itemgetter(1))

I would actually like to sort the list by two criteria: first by the value in field 1 and then by the value in field 2. How do I do this?

  • 2
    Possible duplicate of Sort a list by multiple attributes? – Chris_Rands Aug 3 '17 at 8:34
  • Do we let this question stand and just restrict its scope to "list-of-lists-of-length-two-builtin-types (e.g. string/int/float)". Or do we also allow "list-of-user-defined-object", as the title suggests is also allowed, in which case the answer is "Define __lt__() method on your class or inherit from some class that does"? That would make it a far better canonical. – smci Apr 24 '18 at 22:31
147

like this:

import operator
list1 = sorted(csv1, key=operator.itemgetter(1, 2))
  • 1
    +1: More elegant than mine. I forgot that itemgetter can take multiple indices. – dappawit Mar 6 '11 at 19:43
  • 7
    operator is a module that needs to be imported. – trapicki Aug 28 '13 at 14:45
  • 2
    how will i proceed if i want to sort ascending on one element and descending on other, using itemgetter??. – ashish Oct 12 '13 at 10:13
  • 3
    @ashish, see my answer below with lambda functions this is clear, sort by "-x[1]" or even "x[0]+x[1]" if you wish – jaap Feb 27 '14 at 15:15
  • @jaap: thanks man.. done that. – ashish Feb 28 '14 at 14:25
283

Replying to this dead thread for archive.

No need to import anything when using lambda functions.
The following sorts list by the first element, then by the second element.

sorted(list, key=lambda x: (x[0], -x[1]))
  • 9
    Nice. As you noted in comment to the main answer above, this is the best (only?) way to do multiple sorts with different sort orders. Perhaps highlight that. Also, your text does not indicate that you sorted descending on second element. – PeterVermont Jun 12 '15 at 14:25
  • 2
    @user1700890 I was assuming the field was already string. It should sort strings in alphabetical order by default. You should post your own question separately on SO if it is not specifically related to the answer here or the OP's original question. – pbible Nov 23 '15 at 16:59
  • 3
    what does the - in -x[1] stand for? – jan Feb 26 '16 at 15:55
  • 6
    @jan it's reverse sort – jaap Feb 28 '16 at 23:39
  • 3
    Won't work in one specific case. The accepted solution will not work either. For example, the columns to be used as keys are all strings that cannot be converted to numbers. Secondly, one wants to sort in ascending order by one column and descending order by another column. – coder.in.me Sep 25 '16 at 9:00
18

Python has a stable sort, so provided that performance isn't an issue the simplest way is to sort it by field 2 and then sort it again by field 1.

That will give you the result you want, the only catch is that if it is a big list (or you want to sort it often) calling sort twice might be an unacceptable overhead.

list1 = sorted(csv1, key=operator.itemgetter(2))
list1 = sorted(list1, key=operator.itemgetter(1))

Doing it this way also makes it easy to handle the situation where you want some of the columns reverse sorted, just include the 'reverse=True' parameter when necessary.

Otherwise you can pass multiple parameters to itemgetter or manually build a tuple. That is probably going to be faster, but has the problem that it doesn't generalise well if some of the columns want to be reverse sorted (numeric columns can still be reversed by negating them but that stops the sort being stable).

So if you don't need any columns reverse sorted, go for multiple arguments to itemgetter, if you might, and the columns aren't numeric or you want to keep the sort stable go for multiple consecutive sorts.

Edit: For the commenters who have problems understanding how this answers the original question, here is an example that shows exactly how the stable nature of the sorting ensures we can do separate sorts on each key and end up with data sorted on multiple criteria:

DATA = [
    ('Jones', 'Jane', 58),
    ('Smith', 'Anne', 30),
    ('Jones', 'Fred', 30),
    ('Smith', 'John', 60),
    ('Smith', 'Fred', 30),
    ('Jones', 'Anne', 30),
    ('Smith', 'Jane', 58),
    ('Smith', 'Twin2', 3),
    ('Jones', 'John', 60),
    ('Smith', 'Twin1', 3),
    ('Jones', 'Twin1', 3),
    ('Jones', 'Twin2', 3)
]

# Sort by Surname, Age DESCENDING, Firstname
print("Initial data in random order")
for d in DATA:
    print("{:10s} {:10s} {}".format(*d))

print('''
First we sort by first name, after this pass all
Twin1 come before Twin2 and Anne comes before Fred''')
DATA.sort(key=lambda row: row[1])

for d in DATA:
    print("{:10s} {:10s} {}".format(*d))

print('''
Second pass: sort by age in descending order.
Note that after this pass rows are sorted by age but
Twin1/Twin2 and Anne/Fred pairs are still in correct
firstname order.''')
DATA.sort(key=lambda row: row[2], reverse=True)
for d in DATA:
    print("{:10s} {:10s} {}".format(*d))

print('''
Final pass sorts the Jones from the Smiths.
Within each family members are sorted by age but equal
age members are sorted by first name.
''')
DATA.sort(key=lambda row: row[0])
for d in DATA:
    print("{:10s} {:10s} {}".format(*d))

This is a runnable example, but to save people running it the output is:

Initial data in random order
Jones      Jane       58
Smith      Anne       30
Jones      Fred       30
Smith      John       60
Smith      Fred       30
Jones      Anne       30
Smith      Jane       58
Smith      Twin2      3
Jones      John       60
Smith      Twin1      3
Jones      Twin1      3
Jones      Twin2      3

First we sort by first name, after this pass all
Twin1 come before Twin2 and Anne comes before Fred
Smith      Anne       30
Jones      Anne       30
Jones      Fred       30
Smith      Fred       30
Jones      Jane       58
Smith      Jane       58
Smith      John       60
Jones      John       60
Smith      Twin1      3
Jones      Twin1      3
Smith      Twin2      3
Jones      Twin2      3

Second pass: sort by age in descending order.
Note that after this pass rows are sorted by age but
Twin1/Twin2 and Anne/Fred pairs are still in correct
firstname order.
Smith      John       60
Jones      John       60
Jones      Jane       58
Smith      Jane       58
Smith      Anne       30
Jones      Anne       30
Jones      Fred       30
Smith      Fred       30
Smith      Twin1      3
Jones      Twin1      3
Smith      Twin2      3
Jones      Twin2      3

Final pass sorts the Jones from the Smiths.
Within each family members are sorted by age but equal
age members are sorted by first name.

Jones      John       60
Jones      Jane       58
Jones      Anne       30
Jones      Fred       30
Jones      Twin1      3
Jones      Twin2      3
Smith      John       60
Smith      Jane       58
Smith      Anne       30
Smith      Fred       30
Smith      Twin1      3
Smith      Twin2      3

Note in particular how in the second step the reverse=True parameter keeps the firstnames in order whereas simply sorting then reversing the list would lose the desired order for the third sort key.

  • Thanks that's very helpful. – half full Mar 6 '11 at 19:53
  • 1
    Stable sorting doesn't mean that it won't forget what your previous sorting was. This answer is wrong. – Mike Axiak Mar 6 '11 at 21:10
  • 5
    Stable sorting means that you can sort by columns a, b, c simply by sorting by column c then b then a. Unless you care to expand on your comment I think it is you that is mistaken. – Duncan Mar 6 '11 at 21:23
  • 6
    This answer is definitely correct, although for larger lists it's unideal: if the list was already partially sorted, then you'll lose most of the optimization of Python's sorting by shuffling the list around a lot more. @Mike, you're incorrect; I suggest actually testing answers before declaring them wrong. – Glenn Maynard Mar 6 '11 at 21:39
  • 6
    @MikeAxiak: docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#index-29 states in comment 9: Starting with Python 2.3, the sort() method is guaranteed to be stable. A sort is stable if it guarantees not to change the relative order of elements that compare equal — this is helpful for sorting in multiple passes (for example, sort by department, then by salary grade). – trapicki Aug 28 '13 at 14:40
5
def keyfunc(x):
    return tuple(x[1],x[2])

list1 = sorted(csv1, key=keyfunc)
  • 3
    I don't think tuple() can receive two arguments (or rather, three, if you count with self) – Filipe Correia Dec 12 '12 at 23:15
  • 3
    tuple takes only can take one argument – therealprashant Jun 6 '15 at 11:02
  • 1
    return statement should be return tuple((x[1], x[2])) or simply return x[1], x[2]. Refer @jaap answer below if you're looking for sorting in different directions – Jo Kachikaran Feb 11 '17 at 1:40
  • … or tuple(x[1:3]), if you want to use the tuple constructor for some reason instead of just a tuple display list x[1], x[2]. Or keyfunc = operator.itemgetter(1, 2) and don't even write a function yourself. – abarnert Apr 4 '18 at 17:53
3
employees.sort(key = lambda x:x[1])
employees.sort(key = lambda x:x[0])

We can also use .sort with lambda 2 times because python sort is in place and stable. This will first sort the list according to the second element, x[1]. Then, it will sort the first element, x[0] (highest priority).

employees[0] = Employee's Name employees[1] = Employee's Salary

This is equivalent to doing the following: employees.sort(key = lambda x:(x[0], x[1]))

  • 1
    no, this sorting rule need to take precedence then second. – CodeFarmer Mar 8 at 23:43
1

In ascending order you can use:

sorted_data= sorted(non_sorted_data, key=lambda k: (k[1],k[0]))

or in descending order you can use:

sorted_data= sorted(non_sorted_data, key=lambda k: (k[1],k[0]),reverse=True)
0

Sorting list of dicts using below will sort list in descending order on first column as salary and second column as age

d=[{'salary':123,'age':23},{'salary':123,'age':25}]
d=sorted(d, key=lambda i: (i['salary'], i['age']),reverse=True)

Output: [{'salary': 123, 'age': 25}, {'salary': 123, 'age': 23}]

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