3

My long subject title pretty much covers it.

I have managed to isolate my much bigger problem in the following contrived example below. I cannot figure out where the problem exactly is, though I imagine it has something to do with the type of the preallocated array?

using ForwardDiff

function test()

    A = zeros(1_000_000)

    function objective(A, value)
        for i=1:1_000_000
            A[i] = value[1]
        end

        return sum(A)
    end

    helper_objective = v -> objective(A, v)

    ForwardDiff.gradient(helper_objective, [1.0])

end

The error reads as follows:

ERROR: MethodError: no method matching Float64(::ForwardDiff.Dual{ForwardDiff.Tag{getfield(Main, Symbol("##69#71")){Array{Float64,1},getfield(Main, Symbol("#objective#70")){Array{Float64,1}}},Float64},Float64,1})

In my own problem (not described here) I have a function that I need to optimise using Optim, and the automatic differentiation it offers, and this function makes use of a big matrix that I would like to preallocate in order to speed up my code. Many thanks.

2

If you look at http://www.juliadiff.org/ForwardDiff.jl/latest/user/limitations.html you find:

The target function must be written generically enough to accept numbers of type T<:Real as input (or arrays of these numbers) (...) This also means that any storage assigned used within the function must be generic as well.

with the example here https://github.com/JuliaDiff/ForwardDiff.jl/issues/136#issuecomment-237941790.

This means that you could do something like this:

function test()
    function objective(value)
        for i=1:1_000_000
            A[i] = value[1]
        end
        return sum(A)
    end
    A = zeros(ForwardDiff.Dual{ForwardDiff.Tag{typeof(objective), Float64},Float64,1}, 1_000_000)
    ForwardDiff.gradient(objective, [1.0])
end

But I would not assume that this will save you much allocations as it is type unstable.

What you can do is wrap objective and A in a module like this:

using ForwardDiff

module Obj

using ForwardDiff

function objective(value)
    for i=1:1_000_000
        A[i] = value[1]
    end
    return sum(A)
end
const A = zeros(ForwardDiff.Dual{ForwardDiff.Tag{typeof(objective), Float64},Float64,1}, 1_000_000)

end

And now this:

ForwardDiff.gradient(Obj.objective, [1.0])

should be fast.

EDIT

Also this works (although it is type unstable but in a less problematic place):

function test()::Vector{Float64}
    function objective(A, value)
        for i=1:1_000_000
            A[i] = value[1]
        end

        return sum(A)
    end
    helper_objective = v -> objective(A, v)
    A = Vector{ForwardDiff.Dual{ForwardDiff.Tag{typeof(helper_objective), Float64},Float64,1}}(undef, 1_000_000)
    ForwardDiff.gradient(helper_objective, [1.0])
end

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.