2

I'm having some troubles with expo release channels. I'm not expert about React Native and Expo which makes things much more easier :

If I work with my local development environment, the channel will not be set ( which makes sense ).

But also the final release or "production" will not have a channel set, which makes very unclear how I should recognize 'production' and 'development'.

Then a new complexity level is added if I want to add a channel...like 'staging', which will have instead a channel...

The icing on the cake is that in my deployment system (Circle) I have to build 'development' in a channel ( otherwise NODE_ENV will be "production" )

Did someone figure out how to use channels correctly? :)

basically, I didn't find a solution better than this one:

import { Constants } from 'expo'
const ENV= {production:{},staging:{},development:{}}

// Having fun with channels
const channel = Constants.manifest.releaseChannel;
if (channel === null || channel === undefined || channel === '') {
  if (process.env.NODE_ENV === 'production') {
    return ENV.production;
  }
  if (process.env.NODE_ENV === 'development') {
    return ENV.development;
  }
}
if (channel === 'staging') {
  return ENV.staging;
}
if (channel === 'development') {
  return ENV.development;
}
return ENV.production;

Thank you so much!

2 Answers 2

2

I think you're missing point what are release channels for.

When your app is built with exp build it is bind to one release channel (default as default). Later, if you want to do an OTA update, you can just run exp publish which will publish your code on the release channel (again: default as default).

When you ship a standalone build to your users, you don't want to give them untested code etc via OTA, so you want users to have release channel set to ex. prod.

This is completely separated from NODE_ENV and I don't really see a point in tying them.

2
  • Clearly, I'm missing the point :) Sorry and thank you for your help. I've never published a real build so I don't really know what will happen :) So basically you are saying that when I will publish a real production build it will have channel === default? ( and I guess development === development and staging === staging if I will publish them in right channels) I guess the issues is that I would like to have a development build but with production parameters.
    – Dario
    Sep 4, 2018 at 21:02
  • You can publish your app with whatever release channel you want ;) You just probably want to not use it for anything else.
    – jakubste
    Nov 15, 2018 at 11:31
0

It's worth noting, that process.env.NODE_ENV === 'production' construct makes sense only during bundle build process - bundler would be run with NODE_ENV variable set to specific environment.

In production environment that would mean, that bundler's built-in minifier would replace all occurrences of process.env.NODE_ENV with it's actual value (production f.e.), it's how minifier is configured by default in metro bundler. F.e:

if (process.env.NODE_ENV !== 'production') {
   ... some dev-only code, like 'assert(something)' or 'console.log(some debug info)'
}

would become

if ('production' !== 'production') {
   ... some dev-only code, like 'assert(something)' or 'console.log(some debug info)'
}

and then would be further minified to

if (false) {
   ... some dev-only code, like 'assert(something)' or 'console.log(some debug info)'
}

which then would be completely eliminated from resulting code as the code inside the if statement would never be executed anyway.

For example, your code would be treated in dev mode as:

if (channel === null || channel === undefined || channel === '') {
  if ('development' === 'production') {
    return ENV.production;
  }
  if ('development' === 'development') {
    return ENV.development;
  }
}

... further simplified to:

if (channel === null || channel === undefined || channel === '') {
    return ENV.development;
}

and in prod mode:

if (channel === null || channel === undefined || channel === '') {
  if ('production' === 'production') {
    return ENV.production;
  }
  if ('production' === 'development') {
    return ENV.development;
  }
}

... further simplified to:

if (channel === null || channel === undefined || channel === '') {
    return ENV.production;
}

You should remember, that react-native code runs inside native app on a device, not inside some Node instance, so it knows nothing about strictly Node-specific ecosystem/environment variables (though, you can monkey-patch process.env with custom values via some libs like dot-env etc), it's one of the reasons some Node utils/packages from npm can't be used in a react-native apps as-is, as they are Node-specific (fs f.e.).

It's the same as using process.env.NODE_ENV variable on a front-end code that is served to the client's browser - there's just no process instance available in a browser, and unless your'e using a minifier and configured it to replace process.env.NODE_ENV occurrences with some specific values, your code would simply throw undefined variable access error. Metro bundler handles this specific usecase for you, but it's worth mentioning anyway, I think.

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