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Could I do take commit my changes in a directory by a daily routine? Say, In every 12 AM at early morning, It should commit all the changes in that directory automatically? Is it possible in git? I get some answers for auto commit for every changes. But I want it for daily once commit.

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    You might want to Thing a little more about what an SCM can do for you! Committing a random state into your repository is almost never what you want. A better choice would be every time your Project compiles (and all automated tests are passing). However, this should always be an explicit decision. – Timothy Truckle Sep 4 '18 at 7:21
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If you simply want to commit ALL changes every morning at 12 AM, you can do this using a cronjob.

Assuming that you are using a linux distribution with bash, you can write a bash script that does the commit

#!/bin/bash
cd <git directory> && git add -A && git commit * --allow-empty-message -m ''

Then you can place this cron job in /etc/cron.d/

0 0 * * * <username> /bin/bash <script location>

If you intend to run this as your own user only then you can instead add it to your personal crontab interactively by running

crontab -e
| improve this answer | |
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    downvoted because while this solution is technically correct it does not address the potential missuse of the SCM. – Timothy Truckle Sep 4 '18 at 7:23
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    His usage makes sense if he intends to use git to track certain results, it doesn't always have to be code. – Victor Wong Sep 4 '18 at 7:25
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    I disagree. a SCM is not a backup tool. – Timothy Truckle Sep 4 '18 at 7:26
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    Downvoted because git commit without -m starts the configured editor and waits for it to exit. It doesn't work when it is launched by the cron daemon. git commit * is even worse because the * wildcard is expanded by the shell to the list of files and directories in the current directory. It generates a command line you don't control and that also won't work (unless there is a file named -m in the project). – axiac Sep 4 '18 at 7:38
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    Also, git add * does not add the hidden files (whose names start with .). The correct way to add to the index all the new, modified and removed files is git add -A – axiac Sep 4 '18 at 7:42

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