32

I have 2 strings

string a = "foo bar";
string b = "bar foo";

and I want to detect the changes from a to b. What characters do I have to change, to get from a to b?

I think there must be a iteration over each character and detect if it was added, removed or remained equal. So this is my exprected result

'f' Remove
'o' Remove
'o' Remove
' ' Remove
'b' Equal
'a' Equal
'r' Equal
' ' Add
'f' Add
'o' Add
'o' Add

class and enum for the result:

public enum Operation { Add,Equal,Remove };
public class Difference
{
    public Operation op { get; set; }
    public char c { get; set; }
}

Here is my solution but the "Remove" case is not clear to me how the code has to look like

public static List<Difference> CalculateDifferences(string left, string right)
{
    int count = 0;
    List<Difference> result = new List<Difference>();
    foreach (char ch in left)
    {
        int index = right.IndexOf(ch, count);
        if (index == count)
        {
            count++;
            result.Add(new Difference() { c = ch, op = Operation.Equal });
        }
        else if (index > count)
        {
            string add = right.Substring(count, index - count);
            result.AddRange(add.Select(x => new Difference() { c = x, op = Operation.Add }));
            count += add.Length;
        }
        else
        {
            //Remove?
        }
    }
    return result;
}

How does the code have to look like for removed characters?


Update - added a few more examples

example 1:

string a = "foobar";
string b = "fooar";

expected result:

'f' Equal
'o' Equal
'o' Equal
'b' Remove
'a' Equal
'r' Equal

example 2:

string a = "asdfghjk";
string b = "wsedrftr";

expected result:

'a' Remove
'w' Add
's' Equal
'e' Add
'd' Equal
'r' Add
'f' Equal
'g' Remove
'h' Remove
'j' Remove
'k' Remove
't' Add
'r' Add

Update:

Here is a comparison between Dmitry's and ingen's answer: https://dotnetfiddle.net/MJQDAO

7
  • 14
  • 1
    Edit distance can be easily updated into edit sequence (add backtrace), e.g. web.stanford.edu/class/cs124/lec/med.pdf Sep 4 '18 at 8:53
  • Your question is kind of vague and confuses people. Basically you want to know how you can get string B starting with string A?
    – Pavisa
    Sep 4 '18 at 8:56
  • 1
    What is the case for these two strings: string A = "foobar", string B = "fooar"? Has index 3 been removed, or has index 3 changed from "b" to "a", 4 changed from "a" to "r", and index 5 removed? We can't help you unless you define some rules as to how you evaluate cases like this.
    – JMadelaine
    Sep 4 '18 at 11:54
  • 1
    Try implementing Hirschberg's algorithm.
    – wilx
    Sep 14 '18 at 11:11
22
+100

You are looking for (minimum) edit distance / (minimum) edit sequence. You can find the theory of the process here:

https://web.stanford.edu/class/cs124/lec/med.pdf

Let's implement (simplest) Levenstein Distance / Sequence algorithm (for details see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levenshtein_distance). Let's start from helper classes (I've changed a bit your implementation of them):

  public enum EditOperationKind : byte {
    None,    // Nothing to do
    Add,     // Add new character
    Edit,    // Edit character into character (including char into itself)
    Remove,  // Delete existing character
  };

  public struct EditOperation {
    public EditOperation(char valueFrom, char valueTo, EditOperationKind operation) {
      ValueFrom = valueFrom;
      ValueTo = valueTo;

      Operation = valueFrom == valueTo ? EditOperationKind.None : operation;
    }

    public char ValueFrom { get; }
    public char ValueTo {get ;}
    public EditOperationKind Operation { get; }

    public override string ToString() {
      switch (Operation) {
        case EditOperationKind.None:
          return $"'{ValueTo}' Equal";
        case EditOperationKind.Add:
          return $"'{ValueTo}' Add";
        case EditOperationKind.Remove:
          return $"'{ValueFrom}' Remove";
        case EditOperationKind.Edit:
          return $"'{ValueFrom}' to '{ValueTo}' Edit";
        default:
          return "???";
      }
    }
  }

As far as I can see from the examples provided we don't have any edit operation, but add + remove; that's why I've put editCost = 2 when insertCost = 1, int removeCost = 1 (in case of tie: insert + remove vs. edit we put insert + remove). Now we are ready to implement Levenstein algorithm:

public static EditOperation[] EditSequence(
  string source, string target, 
  int insertCost = 1, int removeCost = 1, int editCost = 2) {

  if (null == source)
    throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
  else if (null == target)
    throw new ArgumentNullException("target");

  // Forward: building score matrix

  // Best operation (among insert, update, delete) to perform 
  EditOperationKind[][] M = Enumerable
    .Range(0, source.Length + 1)
    .Select(line => new EditOperationKind[target.Length + 1])
    .ToArray();

  // Minimum cost so far
  int[][] D = Enumerable
    .Range(0, source.Length + 1)
    .Select(line => new int[target.Length + 1])
    .ToArray();

  // Edge: all removes
  for (int i = 1; i <= source.Length; ++i) {
    M[i][0] = EditOperationKind.Remove;
    D[i][0] = removeCost * i;
  }

  // Edge: all inserts 
  for (int i = 1; i <= target.Length; ++i) {
    M[0][i] = EditOperationKind.Add;
    D[0][i] = insertCost * i;
  }

  // Having fit N - 1, K - 1 characters let's fit N, K
  for (int i = 1; i <= source.Length; ++i)
    for (int j = 1; j <= target.Length; ++j) {
      // here we choose the operation with the least cost
      int insert = D[i][j - 1] + insertCost;
      int delete = D[i - 1][j] + removeCost;
      int edit = D[i - 1][j - 1] + (source[i - 1] == target[j - 1] ? 0 : editCost);

      int min = Math.Min(Math.Min(insert, delete), edit);

      if (min == insert) 
        M[i][j] = EditOperationKind.Add;
      else if (min == delete)
        M[i][j] = EditOperationKind.Remove;
      else if (min == edit)
        M[i][j] = EditOperationKind.Edit;

      D[i][j] = min;
    }

  // Backward: knowing scores (D) and actions (M) let's building edit sequence
  List<EditOperation> result = 
    new List<EditOperation>(source.Length + target.Length);

  for (int x = target.Length, y = source.Length; (x > 0) || (y > 0);) {
    EditOperationKind op = M[y][x];

    if (op == EditOperationKind.Add) {
      x -= 1;
      result.Add(new EditOperation('\0', target[x], op));
    }
    else if (op == EditOperationKind.Remove) {
      y -= 1;
      result.Add(new EditOperation(source[y], '\0', op));
    }
    else if (op == EditOperationKind.Edit) {
      x -= 1;
      y -= 1;
      result.Add(new EditOperation(source[y], target[x], op));
    }
    else // Start of the matching (EditOperationKind.None)
      break;
  }

  result.Reverse();

  return result.ToArray();
}

Demo:

var sequence = EditSequence("asdfghjk", "wsedrftr"); 

Console.Write(string.Join(Environment.NewLine, sequence));

Outcome:

'a' Remove
'w' Add
's' Equal
'e' Add
'd' Equal
'r' Add
'f' Equal
'g' Remove
'h' Remove
'j' Remove
'k' Remove
't' Add
'r' Add
5
  • 1
    first of all thank you, that seems to be the best approach so far, all tests sucessfully done (after converting your class structure into mine)
    – Impostor
    Sep 10 '18 at 11:37
  • @Dr. Snail: if you insisting on getting rid of Edit operation ("after converting your class structure into mine"), it's totally up to you ;) Sep 10 '18 at 11:39
  • If you run the "abc" -> "axc" with your method, the outcome won't be edit that's what I was trying to explain
    – Impostor
    Sep 10 '18 at 11:39
  • 1
    @Dr. Snail: because price of editing is too high (the routing prefers insert + remove combination). Put it as var sequence = Levenshtein.EditSequence("abc", "axc", 1, 1, 1); Please, notice the last 1 instead of 2 Sep 10 '18 at 11:40
  • 1
    I thought I add a graphical comparison to show the purpose behind this question
    – Impostor
    Sep 14 '18 at 9:29
9
+200

I'll go out on a limb here and provide an algorithm that's not the most efficient, but is easy to reason about.

Let's cover some ground first:

1) Order matters

string before = "bar foo"
string after = "foo bar"

Even though "bar" and "foo" occur in both strings, "bar" will need to be removed and added again later. This also tells us it's the after string that gives us the order of chars we're interested in, we want "foo" first.

2) Order over count

Another way to look at it, is that some chars may never get their turn.

string before = "abracadabra"
string after = "bar bar"

Only the bold chars of "bar bar", get their say in "abracadabra". Even though we've got two b's in both strings, only the first one counts. By the time we get to the second b in "bar bar" the second b in "abracadabra" has already been passed, when we were looking for the first occurrence of 'r'.

3) Barriers

Barriers are the chars that exist in both strings, taking order and count into consideration. This already suggests a set might not be the most appropriate data structure, as we would lose count.

For an input

string before = "pinata"
string after = "accidental"

We get (pseudocode)

var barriers = { 'a', 't', 'a' }

"pinata"

"accidental"

Let's follow the execution flow:

  • 'a' is the first barrier, it's also the first char of after so everything prepending the first 'a' in before can be removed. "pinata" -> "ata"
  • the second barrier is 't', it's not at the next position in our after string, so we can insert everything in between. "ata" -> "accidenta"
  • the third barrier 'a' is already at the next position, so we can move to the next barrier without doing any real work.
  • there are no more barriers, but our string length is still less than that of after, so there will be some post processing. "accidenta" -> "accidental"

Note 'i' and 'n' don't get to play, again, order over count.


Implementation

We've established that order and count matter, a Queue comes to mind.

static public List<Difference> CalculateDifferences(string before, string after)
{
    List<Difference> result = new List<Difference>();
    Queue<char> barriers = new Queue<char>();

    #region Preprocessing
    int index = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < after.Length; i++)
    {
        // Look for the first match starting at index
        int match = before.IndexOf(after[i], index);
        if (match != -1)
        {
            barriers.Enqueue(after[i]);
            index = match + 1;
        }
    }
    #endregion

    #region Queue Processing
    index = 0;
    while (barriers.Any())
    {
        char barrier = barriers.Dequeue();
        // Get the offset to the barrier in both strings, 
        // ignoring the part that's already been handled
        int offsetBefore = before.IndexOf(barrier, index) - index;
        int offsetAfter = after.IndexOf(barrier, index) - index;
        // Remove prefix from 'before' string
        if (offsetBefore > 0)
        {
            RemoveChars(before.Substring(index, offsetBefore), result);
            before = before.Substring(offsetBefore);
        }
        // Insert prefix from 'after' string
        if (offsetAfter > 0)
        {
            string substring = after.Substring(index, offsetAfter);
            AddChars(substring, result);
            before = before.Insert(index, substring);
            index += substring.Length;
        }
        // Jump over the barrier
        KeepChar(barrier, result);
        index++;
    }
    #endregion

    #region Post Queue processing
    if (index < before.Length)
    {
        RemoveChars(before.Substring(index), result);
    }
    if (index < after.Length)
    {
        AddChars(after.Substring(index), result);
    }
    #endregion

    return result;
}

static private void KeepChar(char barrier, List<Difference> result)
{
    result.Add(new Difference()
    {
        c = barrier,
        op = Operation.Equal
    });
}

static private void AddChars(string substring, List<Difference> result)
{
    result.AddRange(substring.Select(x => new Difference()
    {
        c = x,
        op = Operation.Add
    }));
}

static private void RemoveChars(string substring, List<Difference> result)
{
    result.AddRange(substring.Select(x => new Difference()
    {
        c = x,
        op = Operation.Remove
    }));
}
0
3

I tested with 3 examples above, and it returns the expected result properly and perfectly.

        int flag = 0;
        int flag_2 = 0;

        string a = "asdfghjk";
        string b = "wsedrftr";

        char[] array_a = a.ToCharArray();
        char[] array_b = b.ToCharArray();

        for (int i = 0,j = 0, n= 0; i < array_b.Count(); i++)
        {   
            //Execute 1 time until reach first equal character   
            if(i == 0 && a.Contains(array_b[0]))
            {
                while (array_a[n] != array_b[0])
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(String.Concat(array_a[n], " : Remove"));
                    n++;
                }
                Console.WriteLine(String.Concat(array_a[n], " : Equal"));
                n++;
            }
            else if(i == 0 && !a.Contains(array_b[0]))
            {
                Console.WriteLine(String.Concat(array_a[n], " : Remove"));
                n++;
                Console.WriteLine(String.Concat(array_b[0], " : Add"));
            }


            else
            {
                if(n < array_a.Count())
                {
                    if (array_a[n] == array_b[i])
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(String.Concat(array_a[n], " : Equal"));
                        n++;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        flag = 0;
                        for (int z = n; z < array_a.Count(); z++)
                        {                              
                            if (array_a[z] == array_b[i])
                            {
                                flag = 1;
                                break;
                            }                                                              
                        }

                        if (flag == 0)
                        {
                            flag_2 = 0;
                            for (int aa = i; aa < array_b.Count(); aa++)
                            {
                                for(int bb = n; bb < array_a.Count(); bb++)
                                {
                                    if (array_b[aa] == array_a[bb])
                                    {
                                        flag_2 = 1;
                                        break;
                                    }
                                }
                            }

                            if(flag_2 == 1)
                            {
                                Console.WriteLine(String.Concat(array_b[i], " : Add"));
                            }
                            else
                            {
                                for (int z = n; z < array_a.Count(); z++)
                                {
                                    Console.WriteLine(String.Concat(array_a[z], " : Remove"));
                                    n++;
                                }
                                 Console.WriteLine(String.Concat(array_b[i], " : Add"));
                            }

                        }
                        else
                        {
                            Console.WriteLine(String.Concat(array_a[n], " : Remove"));
                            i--;
                            n++;
                        }

                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(String.Concat(array_b[i], " : Add"));
                }

            }

        }//end for


        MessageBox.Show("Done");


    //OUTPUT CONSOLE:
    /*
    a : Remove
    w : Add
    s : Equal
    e : Add
    d : Equal
    r : Add
    f : Equal
    g : Remove
    h : Remove
    j : Remove
    k : Remove
    t : Add
    r : Add
    */  
11
  • how about of length of string a and string b, Are they equal ?? Sep 4 '18 at 12:57
  • They can be equal but they can also have different length
    – Impostor
    Sep 4 '18 at 13:01
  • 1
    Okay, I think the expected result of example 2 should be : 'a' Remove 'w' Add 's' Equal 'd' Remove 'e' Add Sep 4 '18 at 13:04
  • You missed : 'd' Remove . Am I right ? So It caused error in expected result for all remaining characters Sep 4 '18 at 13:05
  • 2
    There are some conflicts of your specifications, with example "foo bar" and "bar foo"; you remove all until you get equal character, but with example "asdfghjk"; and "wsedrftr"; You remove and add (if the next character in string a is not equal with current character in string b) Sep 4 '18 at 13:58
3

Here might be another solution, full code and commented. However the result of your first original example is inverted :

class Program
{
    enum CharState
    {
        Add,
        Equal,
        Remove
    }

    struct CharResult
    {
        public char c;
        public CharState state;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string a = "asdfghjk";
        string b = "wsedrftr";
        while (true)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Enter string a (enter to quit) :");
            a = Console.ReadLine();
            if (a == string.Empty)
                break;
            Console.WriteLine("Enter string b :");
            b = Console.ReadLine();

            List<CharResult> result = calculate(a, b);
            DisplayResults(result);
        }
        Console.WriteLine("Press a key to exit");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static List<CharResult> calculate(string a, string b)
    {
        List<CharResult> res = new List<CharResult>();
        int i = 0, j = 0;

        char[] array_a = a.ToCharArray();
        char[] array_b = b.ToCharArray();

        while (i < array_a.Length && j < array_b.Length)
        {
            //For the current char in a, we check for the equal in b
            int index = b.IndexOf(array_a[i], j);
            if (index < 0) //not found, this char should be removed
            {
                res.Add(new CharResult() { c = array_a[i], state = CharState.Remove });
                i++;
            }
            else
            {
                //we add all the chars between B's current index and the index
                while (j < index)
                {
                    res.Add(new CharResult() { c = array_b[j], state = CharState.Add });
                    j++;
                }
                //then we say the current is the same
                res.Add(new CharResult() { c = array_a[i], state = CharState.Equal });
                i++;
                j++;
            }
        }

        while (i < array_a.Length)
        {
            //b is now empty, we remove the remains
            res.Add(new CharResult() { c = array_a[i], state = CharState.Remove });
            i++;
        }
        while (j < array_b.Length)
        {
            //a has been treated, we add the remains
            res.Add(new CharResult() { c = array_b[j], state = CharState.Add });
            j++;
        }

        return res;
    }

    static void DisplayResults(List<CharResult> results)
    {
        foreach (CharResult r in results)
        {
            Console.WriteLine($"'{r.c}' - {r.state}");
        }
    }
}
2
  • this doesn't recognize the common a at string a = "fxiafer";string b = "gkawvgf"; dotnetfiddle.net/YmNrCx
    – Impostor
    Sep 7 '18 at 8:52
  • 1
    @Dr.Snail I understand why. I actually only check for presence in one direction. I will update in the afternoon to check for equality in both direction Sep 7 '18 at 9:15
1

If you want to have a precise comparison between two strings, you must read and understand Levenshtein Distance. by using this algorithm you can precisely calculate rate of similarity between two string and also you can backtrack the algorithm to get the chain of changing on the second string. this algorithm is a important metric for Natural Language Processing also.

there are some other benefits and it's need time to learn.

in this link there is a C# version of Levenshtein Distance :

https://www.dotnetperls.com/levenshtein

3
  • 1
    this algorithm could tell you (for example) your strings are %80 similar. length of these two string are not important and rotation and shifts doesn't affect the result.
    – RezaNoei
    Sep 4 '18 at 13:42
  • And how does this affect my method? I just wanted to have the Remove-part fixed.
    – Impostor
    Sep 4 '18 at 13:44
  • 2
    Excuse me I wanted to know your program's goal actually, "Error Correction" is a field in Text Processing. If you want to track Remove parts you can use Levenshtein Backtrack Algorithm also. Please read "Minimum Edit Distance" PDF File from https://web.stanford.edu/~jurafsky/NLPCourseraSlides.html. There is a good tutorial in Coursera presented by professor Dan Jurafsky.
    – RezaNoei
    Sep 5 '18 at 12:35

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