59

I have a pandas series with boolean entries. I would like to get a list of indices where the values are True.

For example the input pd.Series([True, False, True, True, False, False, False, True])

should yield the output [0,2,3,7].

I can do it with a list comprehension, but is there something cleaner or faster?

2
  • 1
    A better testcase is s = pd.Series([True, False, True, True, False, False, False, True], index=list('ABCDEFGH')). Expected output: Index(['A', 'C', 'D', 'H'], ...). Since some solutions (esp. all the np functions) drop the index and use the autonumber index.
    – smci
    Apr 21 at 22:42
  • ...if we have a named index, it's usually very undesirable to drop it.
    – smci
    Apr 21 at 22:57
103

Using Boolean Indexing

>>> s = pd.Series([True, False, True, True, False, False, False, True])
>>> s[s].index
Int64Index([0, 2, 3, 7], dtype='int64')

If need a np.array object, get the .values

>>> s[s].index.values
array([0, 2, 3, 7])

Using np.nonzero

>>> np.nonzero(s)
(array([0, 2, 3, 7]),)

Using np.flatnonzero

>>> np.flatnonzero(s)
array([0, 2, 3, 7])

Using np.where

>>> np.where(s)[0]
array([0, 2, 3, 7])

Using np.argwhere

>>> np.argwhere(s).ravel()
array([0, 2, 3, 7])

Using pd.Series.index

>>> s.index[s]
array([0, 2, 3, 7])

Using python's built-in filter

>>> [*filter(s.get, s.index)]
[0, 2, 3, 7]

Using list comprehension

>>> [i for i in s.index if s[i]]
[0, 2, 3, 7]
7
  • 3
    what if the series indices has label instead index-range?
    – pyd
    Nov 27 '19 at 17:37
  • @pyd then you can use options referred to in the answer as Boolean Indexing, pd.Series.index. filter and list comprehension — basically NOT the numpy ones
    – Dahn
    Apr 14 '20 at 7:27
  • @Dahn I did not understand your answer. Can you explain further?
    – MattS
    Apr 26 '20 at 13:17
  • @MattS If the series have index other than range index, then any methods listed in rafaelc's answer that are based on numpy won't' work, as numpy will forget the indices upon conversion. I therefore listed the methods that do still work in that case. Does that work for you?
    – Dahn
    Apr 27 '20 at 6:40
  • The last version using list comprehension has just a small typo in the if clause: if s[i] instead of s[I]
    – Guido
    May 14 '20 at 9:07
16

As an addition to rafaelc's answer, here are the according times (from quickest to slowest) for the following setup

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
s = pd.Series([x > 0.5 for x in np.random.random(size=1000)])

Using np.where

>>> timeit np.where(s)[0]
12.7 µs ± 77.4 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100000 loops each)

Using np.flatnonzero

>>> timeit np.flatnonzero(s)
18 µs ± 508 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100000 loops each)

Using pd.Series.index

The time difference to boolean indexing was really surprising to me, since the boolean indexing is usually more used.

>>> timeit s.index[s]
82.2 µs ± 38.9 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)

Using Boolean Indexing

>>> timeit s[s].index
1.75 ms ± 2.16 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

If you need a np.array object, get the .values

>>> timeit s[s].index.values
1.76 ms ± 3.1 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

If you need a slightly easier to read version <-- not in original answer

>>> timeit s[s==True].index
1.89 ms ± 3.52 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

Using pd.Series.where <-- not in original answer

>>> timeit s.where(s).dropna().index
2.22 ms ± 3.32 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

>>> timeit s.where(s == True).dropna().index
2.37 ms ± 2.19 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

Using pd.Series.mask <-- not in original answer

>>> timeit s.mask(s).dropna().index
2.29 ms ± 1.43 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

>>> timeit s.mask(s == True).dropna().index
2.44 ms ± 5.82 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

Using list comprehension

>>> timeit [i for i in s.index if s[i]]
13.7 ms ± 40.5 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

Using python's built-in filter

>>> timeit [*filter(s.get, s.index)]
14.2 ms ± 28.4 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)


Using np.nonzero <-- did not work out of the box for me

>>> timeit np.nonzero(s)
ValueError: Length of passed values is 1, index implies 1000.

Using np.argwhere <-- did not work out of the box for me

>>> timeit np.argwhere(s).ravel()
ValueError: Length of passed values is 1, index implies 1000.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.