2

It seems that I have to define a custom element only after the HTML body has been parsed. If I define it before, the contents of the custom element are empty.

Here is an MWE:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
  <script>
    customElements.define('test-one',
      class extends HTMLElement {
        constructor() {
          super()
          console.log(this.textContent)
        }
      }
    )
  </script>
</head>

<body>
  <test-one>First.</test-one>
  <test-two>Another.</test-two>

  <script>
    customElements.define('test-two',
      class extends HTMLElement {
        constructor() {
          super()
          console.log(this.textContent)
        }
      }
    )
  </script>
</body>
</html>

test-one outputs "" in the console, test-two outputs "Another.".

However, this seems completely unintuitive and I wasted a lot of time reading the spec, but I found no explanation for this behavior. Any ideas? Where is that specified or documented? And this isn't a Chrome issue, Firefox behaves the same.

1
  • I would guess this is because the node itself has been created, for the initial DOM tree creation, but its contents haven't been fully parsed therefore its textContent,innerHTML etc properties haven't been set. The second one works because it has already been created and parsed. And as part of define()'s steps is to upgrade (step 14 and 15) existing elements. Sep 5, 2018 at 3:31

1 Answer 1

5

Actually you can define a Custom Element before it is added to the DOM.

What you cannot do is accessing its content (attributes, child tree, properties) in its constructor(), because this elements have not been parsed (as @Patrick Evans suggested).

In your example you could wait for a little time to access the textContent property.

constructor() {
  super()
  setTimeout( () => console.log(this.textContent) )
}

If you still want to put the custom elements definition in the header, you can wait for the page to be loaded.

window.onload => customElements.define(...)

or, depending on what you are waiting for:

document.addEventListener( 'DOMContentLoaded', customElements.define(...) )

It's not in black and white in the specs because it's rather a consequence of the parsing proccess, but you can read in this HTML Standard section:

The element's attributes and children must not be inspected, as in the non-upgrade case none will be present, and relying on upgrades makes the element less usable.

The "non-upgrade case" is when the element is defined before it is parsed.

7
  • 1
    Great explanation! Now I see. So that does make it intuitive in the sense that the constructor() (and connectedCallback() for that matter) is called already when the opening tag is found. And that also means - contrary to what I thought - that setTimeout and event listeners are not a hack.... because there is simply no other method that gets called (back) when the end tag was processed or the DOM is ready. Alright, I will simply use <script src=... defer>.
    – MiB
    Sep 5, 2018 at 9:41
  • 2
    Note if you want a way of detecting when the contents have been parsed rather than relying on a setTimeout you can use MutationObserver to watch for childList changes and disconnect it once it gets fired, jsfiddle demo here. Might add a little overhead but it will be more reliable than a setTimeout. Sep 5, 2018 at 14:22
  • 1
    I'm not sure (:-) but MutationObserver will work in PO case or when you know how many nodes you are waiting for, but not in the case where the number of nodes is unspecified (unless you have a special, detectable ending node that can trigger the disconnection)
    – Supersharp
    Sep 5, 2018 at 16:49
  • 1
    @Supersharp What is "PO case"? I am lucky, in my case I know that I will only have one text node as a child, so I can stop after the first mutation. Otherwise, you are absolutely correct!
    – MiB
    Sep 6, 2018 at 23:32
  • 1
    plus one for every answer Supersharp writes; FYI, 'PO' is usually written as OP = Original Poster Sep 29, 2018 at 9:48

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.