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I am testing some simple API with Route TestKit and I would like to know if it is possible to cleanly chain requests. Let’s say I want to test that the result of the get, and then a post, gives certain result. What is the cleanest/most idiomatic way to achieve that?

Given an example from the docs:

"leave GET requests to other paths unhandled" in {
  // tests:
  Get("/kermit") ~> smallRoute ~> check {
    handled shouldBe false
  }
}

how would I test such scenario, in which previous Post changes the result of the Get (this is not a correct code, but explains the idea):

"leave GET requests to other paths unhandled" in {
  // tests:
  Post("/kermit") ~> Get("/kermit") ~> smallRoute ~> check {
    handled shouldBe true
  }
}
4
  • you mean you want to use that false value which is return from the post request? in the next get request. I don't know that's the there is any way. Even if there is any way it's not the right way to do you should test each route mutually exclusive. Sep 5 '18 at 9:43
  • When the first POST completes, I want to do a GET (result of the POST can be discarded) and assert on the GET's result. Sep 5 '18 at 9:50
  • The correctness of the POST is checked in some other test already, so I don't want to write assertion on the status code of the POST every time I need it. Or is checking status code every time the way to do that? Sep 5 '18 at 9:55
  • you can make use of beforeEach method of flatSpeck like. there you run your post method test case before every other test case. Sep 5 '18 at 10:27
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I would test each case beginning from the first request. And I would also check the Get before and after Post in the same case.

To run the requests one after another you can nest the Get inside Post:

  // tests:
  Post("/kermit") ~> smallRoute ~> check {
    Get("/kermit") ~> smappROute ~> check {
    //check
    }
  }

Or you can run them sequentially :

Post() ~> complete("ok") ~> check {//empty body}
Get() ~> complete("ok") ~> check {
  //actual checks
}

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