1

I have a series of controllers in my Rails API that are all extremely similar -- they only have basic CRUD actions, and only differ in the shape of the underlying data they are storing.

The way that I'm implementing authorization, in each controller I have some before_action calls that check the permissions at the appropriate level for the given CRUD actions -- these permissions checks are literally duplicates except for each one takes in a differently named instance variable -- e.g. one might say

before_action -> { is_app_admin?(@app_name) } #where @app_name is the actual name of the app.

Now, if somehow the controller itself could take a parameter, I could put these before checks in the ApiController and not have to repeat them. Or, I could change the variable name in all of the controllers to something generic like @app_name, but in the controllers themselves that leads to less readable code.

Is there a standard way of abstracting the duplicate code in this type of scenario?

3

Keep in mind that before_action isn't special syntax, it is just a class method like any other. That means that you could write a class method that calls before_action:

def self.ensure_app_admin_in(var)
  before_action ->{ is_app_admin?(instance_variable_get(var)) }
end

Throw that in a module, controller concern, ApplicationController, or wherever is convenient and then in your controllers say:

class Controller1
  ensure_app_admin_in :@app_name
  #...
end

class Controller2
  ensure_app_admin_in :@my_other_app_name
  #...
end
4
  • 1
    Ah, DSL. The rails way. 👍 – Sergio Tulentsev Sep 6 '18 at 22:50
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    This is great -- still getting accustomed to Ruby, this is exactly what I was hoping to do. – Aaron Cohen Sep 6 '18 at 23:20
  • @SergioTulentsev I've been writing a lot of concerns and "macros" lately. – mu is too short Sep 6 '18 at 23:27
  • One follow-up -- is there still a way to include only or except here? e.g. ensure_app_admin_in :@app_name, only: i%[update destroy] – Aaron Cohen Sep 6 '18 at 23:57
2

Is there a standard way of abstracting the duplicate code in this type of scenario?

Yes. It is, well, abstraction. Hide that varying name in a method with a meaningful name. If, for example, you have these:

class Controller1
  before_action -> { is_app_admin?(@app_name) }
end

class Controller2
  before_action -> { is_app_admin?(@my_other_app_name) }
end

Then here is what you could do:

class Controller1
  before_action -> { is_app_admin?(app_name_for_authorization) }

  private 

  def app_name_for_authorization
    @app_name
  end
end

class Controller2
  before_action -> { is_app_admin?(app_name_for_authorization) }

  private 

  def app_name_for_authorization
    @my_other_app_name
  end
end

The before actions are now identical and you can pull them up to a parent class or extract as a concern.

3
  • This makes sense -- it's certainly less duplicate code than my current form, but still has the private method that's essentially copy/paste across controllers. I guess my hope was that there was a way to avoid that entirely. I get that that isn't really possible, as somewhere in the code I must say hey -- this variable is the appname. – Aaron Cohen Sep 6 '18 at 22:21
  • @AaronCohen: "that's essentially copy/paste across controllers" - what if I told you that you can have more than two levels in your controller class hierarchy? :) What I mean is, if you have 30 controllers that all use name @my_app, you can create an intermediate controller class (MyAppController or something) that'd have that private method, and inherit all 30 controllers from it, instead of ApplicationController. – Sergio Tulentsev Sep 6 '18 at 22:27
  • 1
    Yep -- I'm already doing that, between CRUD actions at the app (think plugin level) and the resources within the app, as they have different permissions. Thanks for the help! – Aaron Cohen Sep 6 '18 at 22:33
0

You could create a module and put your similar controllers inside it, with a base_controller similar to application_controller that will have your before_actions, and only the controllers inheriting from it would use them.

For example if you have some admin controllers:

class Admin::BaseController < ApplicationController
  before_action :authorize_admin!

  def authorize_admin!
    redirect_to root_path unless user.admin?
  end
end

class Admin::UsersController < Admin::BaseController
  def index
  end
end

Then in your routes you could either namespace, or add module to the route like this:

resources :users, module: 'admin'

Then put your admin controllers in app/controllers/admin and your views in app/views/admin/users.

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