1

I have been looking into Golang, and seeing how good its concurrency is with its enforcement of a coroutine-channel-only model through its innovative goroutines construct.

One thing that I immediately find troubling is the use of the Wait() method, used to wait until multiple outstanding goroutines spawned inside a parent goroutine have finished. To quote the Golang docs

Wait can be used to block until all goroutines have finished

The fact that many go developers prescribe Wait() as the preferred way to implement concurrency seems antithetical to Golang's mission of enabling developers to write efficient software, because blocking is inefficient, and truly asynchronous code never blocks.

A process [or thread] that is blocked is one that is waiting for some event, such as a resource becoming available or the completion of an I/O operation.

In other words, a blocked thread will spend CPU cycles doing nothing useful, just checking repeatedly to see if its currently running task can stop waiting and continue its execution.

In truly asynchronous code, when a coroutine encounters a situation where it cannot continue until a result arrives, it must yield its execution to the scheduler instead of blocking, by switching its state from running to waiting, so the scheduler can begin executing the next-in-line coroutine from the runnable queue. The waiting coroutine should have its state changed from waiting to runnable only once the result it needs has arrived.

Therefore, since Wait() blocks until x number of goroutines have invoked Done(), the goroutine which calls Wait() will always remain in either a runnable or running state, wasting CPU cycles and relying on the scheduler to preempt the long-running goroutine only to change its state from running to runnable, instead of changing it to waiting as it should be.

If all this is true, and I'm understanding how Wait() works correctly, then why aren't people using the built-in Go channels for the task of waiting for sub-goroutines to complete? If I understand correctly, sending to a buffered channel, and reading from any channel are both asynchronous operations, meaning that invoking them will put the goroutine into a waiting state, so why aren't they the preferred method?

The article I referenced gives a few examples. Here's what the author calls the "Old School" way:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    messages := make(chan int)
    go func() {
        time.Sleep(time.Second * 3)
        messages <- 1
    }()
    go func() {
        time.Sleep(time.Second * 2)
        messages <- 2
    }()
    go func() {
        time.Sleep(time.Second * 1)
        messages <- 3
    }()
    for i := 0; i < 3; i++ {
        fmt.Println(<-messages)
    }
}

and here is the preferred, "Canonical" way:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sync"
    "time"
)

func main() {
    messages := make(chan int)
    var wg sync.WaitGroup
    wg.Add(3)
    go func() {
        defer wg.Done()
        time.Sleep(time.Second * 3)
        messages <- 1
    }()
    go func() {
        defer wg.Done()
        time.Sleep(time.Second * 2)
        messages <- 2
    }() 
    go func() {
        defer wg.Done()
        time.Sleep(time.Second * 1)
        messages <- 3
    }()
    wg.Wait()
    for i := range messages {
        fmt.Println(i)
    }
}

I can understand that the second might be easier to understand than the first, but the first is asynchronous where no coroutines block, and the second has one coroutine which blocks: the one running the main function. Here is another example of Wait() being the generally accepted approach.

Why isn't Wait() considered an anti-pattern by the Go community if it creates an inefficient blocked thread? Why aren't channels preferred by most in this situation, since they can by used to keep all the code asynchronous and the thread optimized?

  • 2
    "truly asynchronous code never blocks" -- Not true, at all. Asynchronicity just means that the entire process isn't blocked. And nothing about Wait() makes the entire process block--it obviously only makes the single goroutine from which it is called, block. – Flimzy Sep 7 '18 at 12:22
  • 1
    Regardless of the reasoning and the arguments themselves (it is a question after all, it is possible, or even expected, to include mistakes), I think OP has put some effort in thinking and posing them correctly. I cannot explain the downvote. – chrk Sep 7 '18 at 12:28
  • 4
    <- channel is also blocking, though. – Flimzy Sep 7 '18 at 12:33
  • 4
    "nonblocking way to wait" is a contradiction in terms. Block means wait. – Flimzy Sep 7 '18 at 12:36
  • 5
    A key misconception in the question is that a blocked goroutine spends CPU cycles checking repeatedly to see if the current goroutine can stop waiting and continue its execution. This is not how it works. The goroutine consumes no cycles until it's rescheduled to run. – Cerise Limón Sep 7 '18 at 12:41
12

Your understanding of "blocking" is incorrect. Blocking operations such as WaitGroup.Wait() or a channel receive (when there is no value to receive) only block the execution of the goroutine, they do not (necessarily) block the OS thread which is used to execute the (statements of the) goroutine.

Whenever a blocking operation (such as the above mentioned) is encountered, the goroutine scheduler may (and it will) switch to another goroutine that may continue to run. There are no (significant) CPU cycles lost during a WaitGroup.Wait() call, if there are other goroutines that may continue to run, they will.

Please check related question: Number of threads used by Go runtime

  • 1
    I think blocking seems like the wrong word to use because in my experience it's always in reference to the OS thread. Anyways, are the operations of WaitGroup.Wait() and channel receive signals to the Go scheduler to halt execution of those goroutines immediately, or will they only be stopped due to a preemptive timeout which limits how long a goroutine can run? – AjaxLeung Sep 7 '18 at 12:43
  • 3
    @AjaxLeung: "in my experience [blocking] always in reference to the OS thread." -- This isn't a problem with the term "blocking", it's just the result of not having used this execution model before. – Flimzy Sep 7 '18 at 12:45
  • 2
    @AjaxLeung In the Go world almost all statements are related to goroutines, not threads. If someone says something is blocking, that means it blocks the goroutine–unless explicitly stated otherwise. – icza Sep 7 '18 at 12:45
  • Other languages describe tasks as being "paused" or "suspended" so as not to conflate the concept with threads which can be blocked. It's interesting that the Go world chose to use block when alternatives are used elsewhere. – AjaxLeung Sep 7 '18 at 13:14
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    @AjaxLeung Wait() is a good scheduling point, but it does not guarantee other goroutines will be scheduled. That's up to the scheduler. E.g. if all Done() calls preceed the call to Wait(), then Wait() will not block and the goroutine might continue (without the scheduler scheduling another goroutine). – icza Sep 7 '18 at 13:40

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