2237

I have a JavaScript object, is there a built-in or accepted best practice way to get the length of this object?

const myObject = new Object();
myObject["firstname"] = "Gareth";
myObject["lastname"] = "Simpson";
myObject["age"] = 21;
  • 14
    Object literals in javascript are by default associative arrays eg object.propertyName.propertyValue is the same as object[propertyName][propertyValue] – neitony Feb 13 '11 at 16:19
  • 6
    Added a one-liner in Underscore.js that does this: stackoverflow.com/a/11346637/11236 – ripper234 Jul 8 '12 at 10:31
  • 29
    Once line answer is use Object.keys(myArray).length as @aeosynth said. – Ranadheer Reddy Jun 22 '13 at 7:50
  • 60
    ok, how about Object.keys(obj).length – Muhammad Umer Feb 25 '15 at 0:14
  • 5
    Why isn't object.length valid? It returns the correct result for me. – Adrian M Jun 26 '16 at 17:01

38 Answers 38

3

Use Object.keys(myObject).length to get the length of object/array

var myObject = new Object();
myObject["firstname"] = "Gareth";
myObject["lastname"] = "Simpson";
myObject["age"] = 21;

console.log(Object.keys(myObject).length); //3
2

Like most JavaScript problems, there are many solutions. You could extend the Object that for better or worse works like many other languages' Dictionary (+ first class citizens). Nothing wrong with that, but another option is to construct a new Object that meets your specific needs.

function uberject(obj){
    this._count = 0;
    for(var param in obj){
        this[param] = obj[param];
        this._count++;
    }
}

uberject.prototype.getLength = function(){
    return this._count;
};

var foo = new uberject({bar:123,baz:456});
alert(foo.getLength());
  • don't modify the prototype :) – zero_cool Oct 1 '18 at 22:45
  • 3
    Modifying the prototype of a factory function is the way you extend them. – Ron Sims II Oct 3 '18 at 15:35
1

Simple solution:

  var myObject = {};      // ... your object goes here.

  var length = 0;

  for (var property in myObject) {
    if (myObject.hasOwnProperty(property)){
      length += 1;
    }
  };

  console.log(length);    // logs 0 in my example.
0

The solution work for many cases and cross browser:

Code

var getTotal = function(collection) {

    var length = collection['length'];
    var isArrayObject =  typeof length == 'number' && length >= 0 && length <= Math.pow(2,53) - 1; // Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER

    if(isArrayObject) {
        return collection['length'];
    }

    i= 0;
    for(var key in collection) {
        if (collection.hasOwnProperty(key)) {
            i++;
        }
    }

    return i;
};

Data Examples:

// case 1
var a = new Object();
a["firstname"] = "Gareth";
a["lastname"] = "Simpson";
a["age"] = 21;

//case 2
var b = [1,2,3];

// case 3
var c = {};
c[0] = 1;
c.two = 2;

Usage

getLength(a); // 3
getLength(b); // 3
getLength(c); // 2
-1

The Object.keys NOT return right result in case of object inheritance. To properly count object properties including inherited one use for-in e.g. by following function (related question)

var objLength = (o,i=0) => { for(p in o) i++; return i }

var myObject = new Object();
myObject["firstname"] = "Gareth";
myObject["lastname"] = "Simpson";
myObject["age"] = 21;

var child = Object.create(myObject);
child["sex"] = "male";

var objLength = (o,i=0) => { for(p in o) i++; return i }

console.log("Object.keys(myObject):", Object.keys(myObject).length, "(OK)");
console.log("Object.keys(child)   :", Object.keys(child).length, "(wrong)");
console.log("objLength(child)     :", objLength(child), "(OK)");

-1

I had a similar need to calculate the bandwidth used by objects received over a websocket. Simply finding the length of the Stringified object was enough for me.

websocket.on('message', data => {
    dataPerSecond += JSON.stringify(data).length;
}
-2

At the best answer, In my opinion , if (obj.hasOwnProperty(key)) control is redundant. It returns always true.

Object.size = function(obj) {
    var size = 0, key;
    for (key in obj) {
     size++;
   }
   return size;
};
  • This is incorrect and misleading. If you don't understand why code is written like it is, don't change it. Instead try to look up the methods and understand what they do. The reason hasOwnProperty is used is to prevent counting the keys on its prototype. Example: parent = {a: 1, b:2}; child = Object.create(parent); Object.keys(child) === 0; Object.size(child) === 2;. This is using your Object.size, not the correct one. – oligofren Sep 21 '18 at 8:49
-4

var myObject = new Object();
myObject["firstname"] = "Gareth";
myObject["lastname"] = "Simpson";
myObject["age"] = 21;

var size = JSON.stringify(myObject).length;

document.write(size);

JSON.stringify(myObject)

  • the question resolved around the number of properties. your answer just shows what the length of one (out of many!) serialized forms is. – oligofren Sep 21 '18 at 8:50

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