72

I was wondering how to limit the amount of LINES (not characters as asked in other questions) a user can enter when editing a UITextField.

Ideally, I would like to limit the input to max. 10 lines.

Where would I need to start? Do I do this with a method? In

 - (BOOL)textViewShouldBeginEditing:(UITextView *)aTextView
15
0

You have the right idea, but the wrong method. textView:shouldChangeTextInRange:replacementText: is called whenever the text is going to change; you can access the current content of the text view using its text property, and you can construct the new content from the passed range and replacement text with [textView.text stringByReplacingCharactersInRange:range withString:replacementText]. You can then count the number of lines and return YES to allow the change or NO to reject it.

| improve this answer | |
  • Or did you mean on-screen lines, rather than logical lines of text? – Anomie Mar 8 '11 at 3:37
  • Actually, yes, I want to know on-screen lines. I want to load a txt file into a UITextView and limit the lines shown on the screen to 10 or 15 and then have the rest on the next screen. It's really like a little word processor which has individual pages. That's why I want to limit the lines (on screen) displayed in the UITextView. But perhaps there is an easier way to do this? Perhaps use UIWebView? – n.evermind Mar 8 '11 at 9:12
  • 1
    If all you want is paged behavior, note that UITextView is a subclass of UIScrollView and so has the pagingEnabled property. – Anomie Mar 8 '11 at 11:47
  • I don't think this works as shouldChangeTextInRange can only count the number of lines prior to the new input. Adding a line for each time the new text is "\n" doesn't work either as the user could naturally reach the end of the line. – Declan McKenna Jun 18 '13 at 14:33
227
0

Maciek Czarnik answer does not worked for me, but it got me insights what to do.

iOS 7+

Swift

textView.textContainer.maximumNumberOfLines = 10
textView.textContainer.lineBreakMode = .byTruncatingTail

ObjC

textView.textContainer.maximumNumberOfLines = 10;
textView.textContainer.lineBreakMode = NSLineBreakByTruncatingTail;
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    This should be the accepted answer now, even if it is a few years late, it works! – Siegfoult May 18 '15 at 20:52
  • 30
    This is buggy. It allows you to hit return past the end of the text view and then your cursor disappears and you have to hit delete to find it again. – Eric Conner Aug 11 '16 at 18:42
  • Swift 2: textView.textContainer.lineBreakMode = .ByTruncatingTail – App Dev Guy Sep 29 '16 at 12:40
55
0

Maybe this can help (iOS 7+):

textView.textContainer.maximumNumberOfLines = 10;
[textView.layoutManager textContainerChangedGeometry:textView.textContainer];

Even first line should do the trick I guess, but doesn't... Maybe its a bug in SDK

| improve this answer | |
12
0

Maciek Czarnik's answer does not seem to work for me, even in iOS7. It gives me strange behavior, I don't know why.

What I do to limit the number of lines in the UITextView is simply :

(tested only in iOS7) In the following UITextViewDelegate method :

- (void)textViewDidChange:(UITextView *)textView
{
    NSUInteger maxNumberOfLines = 5;
    NSUInteger numLines = textView.contentSize.height/textView.font.lineHeight;
    if (numLines > maxNumberOfLines)
    {
        textView.text = [textView.text substringToIndex:textView.text.length - 1];
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • CGSize size = [textView sizeThatFits:CGSizeMake(textView.width, MAXFLOAT)]; for me I had to calc the new height it will be for this to work – tettoffensive Apr 8 '16 at 0:52
  • nice solution easy and perfect – aftab muhammed khan Jun 22 '19 at 14:08
11
0

in Swift 3.0 version:

self.textView.textContainer.maximumNumberOfLines = self.textViewNumberOflines
self.textView.textContainer.lineBreakMode = .byTruncatingTail
| improve this answer | |
6
0

Here's a improved Version of Numereyes answer in Swift 4.2 / Swift 5

I made a little extension so I can reuse the code. I'm using a While-Loop to check if the size fits. This also works when the user pastes a lot of text at once.

extension UITextView {        
    var numberOfCurrentlyDisplayedLines: Int {
        let size = systemLayoutSizeFitting(UIView.layoutFittingCompressedSize)
        //for Swift <=4.0, replace with next line:
        //let size = systemLayoutSizeFitting(UILayoutFittingCompressedSize)

        return Int(((size.height - layoutMargins.top - layoutMargins.bottom) / font!.lineHeight))
    }

    /// Removes last characters until the given max. number of lines is reached
    func removeTextUntilSatisfying(maxNumberOfLines: Int) {
        while numberOfCurrentlyDisplayedLines > (maxNumberOfLines) {
            text = String(text.dropLast())
            layoutIfNeeded()
        }
    }
}

// Use it in UITextView's delegate method:
func textViewDidChange(_ textView: UITextView) {        
    textView.removeTextUntilSatisfying(maxNumberOfLines: 10)
}        
| improve this answer | |
3
0

The other solutions given do not solve an issue related to a last line being created at the end (an 11th line in the question's case).

Here is a working solution with Swift 4.0 & Xcode 9.0 beta (found on this blog post)

   class ViewController: UIViewController, UITextViewDelegate {

      @IBOutlet weak var textView: UITextView!

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        textView.delegate = self
        textView.textContainer.maximumNumberOfLines = 10
        textView.textContainer.lineBreakMode = .byWordWrapping
      }

    func textView(_ textView: UITextView, shouldChangeTextIn range: NSRange, replacementText text: String) -> Bool {

        let existingLines = textView.text.components(separatedBy: CharacterSet.newlines)
        let newLines = text.components(separatedBy: CharacterSet.newlines)
        let linesAfterChange = existingLines.count + newLines.count - 1

        return linesAfterChange <= textView.textContainer.maximumNumberOfLines
    }

Nota bene: This solution does not handle the scenario where the last line is too long to display (text will be hidden on the far right side of the UITextView).

| improve this answer | |
3
0

Swift 4

func textView(_ textView: UITextView, shouldChangeTextIn range: NSRange, replacementText text: String) -> Bool {
    let existingLines = textView.text.components(separatedBy: CharacterSet.newlines)
    let newLines = text.components(separatedBy: CharacterSet.newlines)
    let linesAfterChange = existingLines.count + newLines.count - 1
    return linesAfterChange <= textView.textContainer.maximumNumberOfLines
}

And if you want to limit characters also:

func textView(_ textView: UITextView, shouldChangeTextIn range: NSRange, replacementText text: String) -> Bool {
        let existingLines = textView.text.components(separatedBy: CharacterSet.newlines)
        let newLines = text.components(separatedBy: CharacterSet.newlines)
        let linesAfterChange = existingLines.count + newLines.count - 1
        if(text == "\n") {
            return linesAfterChange <= textView.textContainer.maximumNumberOfLines
        }

        let newText = (textView.text as NSString).replacingCharacters(in: range, with: text)
        let numberOfChars = newText.count
        return numberOfChars <= 30 // 30 characters limit
    }
}

don't forget to add how many lines you want the limit to be in viewDidLoad:

txtView.textContainer.maximumNumberOfLines = 2
| improve this answer | |
1
0

Similar to other answers, but usable directly from Storyboard and without subclassing:

extension UITextView {
    @IBInspectable var maxNumberOfLines: NSInteger {
        set {
            textContainer.maximumNumberOfLines = maxNumberOfLines
        }
        get {
            return textContainer.maximumNumberOfLines
        }
    }
    @IBInspectable var lineBreakByTruncatingTail: Bool {
        set {
            if lineBreakByTruncatingTail {
                textContainer.lineBreakMode = .byTruncatingTail
            }
        }
        get {
            return textContainer.lineBreakMode == .byTruncatingTail
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.