30

I come from a Typescript background. I'm bringing static type checking into a python project I'm working on (using mypy).

In Typescript, it is valid to return null from a function that is annotated to return something else, i.e. a string:

function test(flag: boolean): string {
    if(flag) {
        return 'success';
    } else {
        return null;
    }
}

It is also valid to annotate your function to have multiple potential return types, i.e. string or boolean:

function test(flag: boolean): string | boolean {
    if(flag) {
        return 'success';
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

But, in python using mypy, I'm disallowed from returning None from a function that is annotated to return str.

def test(flag: bool) -> str:
    if flag:
        return 'success'
    else:
        return None
        # [mypy] error:Incompatible return value type (got "None", expected "str")

Furthermore, I don't see a way to annotate multiple return types, i.e. str | None.

How should I approach something like this using mypy? Functions that return None from the error state are all over my codebase.

3
  • Could you just return an empty string instead?
    – K-Log
    Commented Sep 10, 2018 at 19:26
  • That is logical: In Python, None is not rally a "null reference", it is an object (just like any other object), and its type is NoneType. Commented Sep 10, 2018 at 19:35
  • @WillemVanOnsem yeah, it makes sense the None type in python is different than a null reference in javascript.
    – Corey Cole
    Commented Sep 10, 2018 at 19:50

1 Answer 1

51

Okay, I found what I was missing in the documentation thanks to @zsol on the mypy gitter!

Two helpful mypy features are the Optional and Union types that can be imported from python's typing module. Documentation here.

If you want to annotate that the function can potentially return None in addition to the primary type, e.g. str, use Optional:

from typing import Optional

def test(flag: bool) -> Optional[str]:
    if flag:
        return 'success'
    else:
        return None

If you want to annotate that the function can potentially return multiple types, e.g. str | bool, use Union:

from typing import Union

def test(flag: bool) -> Union[str, bool]:
    if flag:
        return 'success'
    else:
        return False
3
  • 1
    You can also use no_strict_optional = True (or --no-strict-optional in cmd line) to allows accept None for any expected type.
    – Sylvain
    Commented Aug 10, 2023 at 9:19
  • what about functions that don't have a return statement? i read you would use def func() -> None but None is not a type. It is an object and its type is NoneType so how come we don't do def func() -> NoneType ? EDIT: oh I found it stackoverflow.com/questions/36797282/… Commented Feb 10 at 5:24
  • Python doesn't have functions with void return type. Any function (or branch in a function) without an explicit return will return None. The default for a missing annotation is Any, not None. If you leave out the return annotation, type checkers will treat your function as returning Any. peps.python.org/pep-0484/#the-meaning-of-annotations
    – Corey Cole
    Commented Feb 14 at 5:52

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