7

The script reads the lines from the file, here's the code:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use AnyEvent;

open my $fh, '<', 'input.txt' or die "Can't open file: $!";

my $cv = AE::cv;

my $timer = AE::timer 0, 10, sub {
    printf "TELL: %s EOF: %s\n", tell $fh, eof $fh;
    print while <$fh>;
};

$cv->recv;

If I add lines through cat, then the script reads the new lines. But if I edit the file through a vim editor, then the script does not see any new lines in the file and issues an EOF. Why does the script behave this way and do not see new lines?

Output of the script:

$ perl test.pl
TELL: 0 EOF:
row_1
row_2
row_3
TELL: 18 EOF: 1
TELL: 18 EOF: 1
TELL: 18 EOF:
row_4
TELL: 24 EOF:
row_5
TELL: 30 EOF: 1
TELL: 30 EOF: 1
TELL: 30 EOF: 1
TELL: 30 EOF: 1

The initial content of the input.txt:

row_1
row_2
row_3

Added via cat:

$ cat >> input.txt
row_4
row_5

Added via vim:

$ vim input.txt
row_6
row_7
8

The shell's >> directive opens the existing file, while vim creates a new file with the same name as the old one, leaving your program reading an a now-anonymous file.

$ touch a

$ perl -MFile::stat -e'my $qfn = $ARGV[0]; my $s = stat($qfn) or die $!; printf "%s:%s\n", $s->dev, $s->ino' a
2065:1084527165

$ cat >>a
foo

$ perl -MFile::stat -e'my $qfn = $ARGV[0]; my $s = stat($qfn) or die $!; printf "%s:%s\n", $s->dev, $s->ino' a
2065:1084527165

$ vim a

$ perl -MFile::stat -e'my $qfn = $ARGV[0]; my $s = stat($qfn) or die $!; printf "%s:%s\n", $s->dev, $s->ino' a
2065:1084520254

You need to re-open the file.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use AnyEvent;
use Fcntl qw( SEEK_SET );

my $cv = AE::cv;

my $qfn = $ARGV[0];
my $last_pos = 0;

my $timer = AE::timer 0, 10, sub {
    open(my $fh, '<', $qfn)
        or die("Can't open file: $!\n");
    seek($fh, $last_pos, SEEK_SET)
        or die("Can't seek: $!\n");

    printf "TELL: %s EOF: %s\n", tell $fh, eof $fh;

    print while <$fh>;

    ( $last_pos = tell($fh) ) >= 0
        or die("Can't tell: $!\n");
};

$cv->recv;

Outputs:

$ echo foo >a

$ perl a.pl a
TELL: 0 EOF:
foo
TELL: 4 EOF: 1
TELL: 4 EOF: 1        echo bar >>foo
TELL: 4 EOF:
bar
TELL: 8 EOF: 1
TELL: 8 EOF: 1        Used vim to change the file to "The quick brown fox"
TELL: 8 EOF:
k brown fox
TELL: 20 EOF: 1
^C
  • Indeed, vim changes the inode. I checked other console editors: mcedit, nano they like cat edit the existing file and not replace it with a new one. Why does vim behave this way? I wanted to use Linux::Inotify2 to track the modification of the file, but if the file is ruled in vim then it is without meaning. – Dmitriy Sep 10 '18 at 22:32
  • 1
    Re "Why does vim behave this way?", I'm guessing it saves to a temporary file, then renames the temporary file. This way, you don't risk losing both the new and the old file. – ikegami Sep 10 '18 at 22:42
  • If adding set backupcopy=yes to ~/.vimrc file, then vim will not replace the file – Dmitriy Sep 10 '18 at 22:57
  • 1
    You can get notified of the file creation if you monitor the directory, right? – ikegami Sep 11 '18 at 3:58
  • @Dmitriy Also, there are yet other flags which can detect metadata change, along with a good selection of other events of interest. You want to add them anyway. While a directory monitor on its own can be used to handle (nearly?) all of that, too. – zdim Sep 11 '18 at 5:31

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