13

I'm trying to convert the following xml to json, thereby I need to get a mapping to the TS-tc-dt

Here is the xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<TestScenario>
   <TestSuite name="TS_EdgeHome">
      <TestCaseName name="tc_Login">dt_EdgeCaseHome,dt_EdgeCaseRoute</TestCaseName>
      <TestCaseName name="tc_Logout">dt_EdgeCaseRoute</TestCaseName>
   </TestSuite>
   <TestSuite name="TS_EdgePanel">
      <TestCaseName name="tc_AddContract">dt_EdgeCaseHome,dt_EdgeCaseSpectrum</TestCaseName>
   </TestSuite>
      <TestSuite name="TS_EdgeRoute">
      <TestCaseName name="tc_VerifyContract">dt_EdgeCaseRoute</TestCaseName>
      <TestCaseName name="tc_Payment">dt_EdgeCaseRoute</TestCaseName>
   </TestSuite>
   <TestSuite name="TS_EdgeSpectrum">
      <TestCaseName name="tc_ClientFeedback">dt_EdgeCaseSpectrum</TestCaseName>
   </TestSuite>
</TestScenario>

How can I achieve this in NodeJS?

19

You can use xml2json npm for converting your xml in to json. xml2json.

Step 1:- Install package in you project

npm install xml2json

Step 2:- You can use that package and convert your xml to json

let xmlParser = require('xml2json');
let xmlString = `<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<TestScenario>
   <TestSuite name="TS_EdgeHome">
      <TestCaseName name="tc_Login">dt_EdgeCaseHome,dt_EdgeCaseRoute</TestCaseName>
      <TestCaseName name="tc_Logout">dt_EdgeCaseRoute</TestCaseName>
   </TestSuite>
   <TestSuite name="TS_EdgePanel">
      <TestCaseName name="tc_AddContract">dt_EdgeCaseHome,dt_EdgeCaseSpectrum</TestCaseName>
   </TestSuite>
      <TestSuite name="TS_EdgeRoute">
      <TestCaseName name="tc_VerifyContract">dt_EdgeCaseRoute</TestCaseName>
      <TestCaseName name="tc_Payment">dt_EdgeCaseRoute</TestCaseName>
   </TestSuite>
   <TestSuite name="TS_EdgeSpectrum">
      <TestCaseName name="tc_ClientFeedback">dt_EdgeCaseSpectrum</TestCaseName>
   </TestSuite>
</TestScenario>`;

console.log('JSON output', xmlParser.toJson(xmlString));

Hope this might be helps to you.

| improve this answer | |
21

I've used xml-js - npm to get the desired result.

First of all I've installed xml-js via npm install xml-js

Then used the below code to get the output in json format

var convert = require('xml-js');
var xml = require('fs').readFileSync('./testscenario.xml', 'utf8');

var result = convert.xml2json(xml, {compact: true, spaces: 4});
console.log(result);
| improve this answer | |
  • I tried the package in the accepted answer and I got this error: xml not formated well, but xml-js package worked perfectly. Thanks – ilya Jul 16 '19 at 11:23
9

If you are choosing between xml2json and xml-js then as far as I understand the differences are:

  • xml-js has much less dependencies and uses sax-js for xml parsing.
  • xml2json has more dependencies including node-expat that requires python and can be a headache during npm i. But node-expat claims to be ~3 times faster than sax-js.

Also be aware that xml2json and xml-js produce a bit different JSON. When I replaced xml2json with xml-js I had to add "._attributes" everywhere where values were in attributes.

| improve this answer | |
2

In 6 simple ES6 lines:

xml2json = xml => {                                                                                                                                                     
  var el = xml.nodeType === 9 ? xml.documentElement : xml                                                                                                               
  var h  = {name: el.nodeName}                                                                                                                                          
  h.content    = Array.from(el.childNodes || []).filter(e => e.nodeType === 3).map(e => e.textContent).join('').trim()                                                  
  h.attributes = Array.from(el.attributes || []).filter(a => a).reduce((h, a) => { h[a.name] = a.value; return h }, {})                                                 
  h.children   = Array.from(el.childNodes || []).filter(e => e.nodeType === 1).map(c => h[c.nodeName] = xml2json(c))                                                    
  return h                                                                                                                                                              
}

Test with echo "xml2json_example()" | node -r xml2json.es6 with source at https://github.com/brauliobo/biochemical-db/blob/master/lib/xml2json.es6

| improve this answer | |
  • This loses mixed-content and element ordering (attribute ordering is at parser's choice anyways). Many disavow mixed-content anyways so.. Not a problem, just some users might care. – Brian Chrisman Dec 13 '19 at 15:39
1

You can also try camaro

const { transform } = require('camaro')

const xml = `
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<TestScenario>
   <TestSuite name="TS_EdgeHome">
      <TestCaseName name="tc_Login">dt_EdgeCaseHome,dt_EdgeCaseRoute</TestCaseName>
      <TestCaseName name="tc_Logout">dt_EdgeCaseRoute</TestCaseName>
   </TestSuite>
   <TestSuite name="TS_EdgePanel">
      <TestCaseName name="tc_AddContract">dt_EdgeCaseHome,dt_EdgeCaseSpectrum</TestCaseName>
   </TestSuite>
      <TestSuite name="TS_EdgeRoute">
      <TestCaseName name="tc_VerifyContract">dt_EdgeCaseRoute</TestCaseName>
      <TestCaseName name="tc_Payment">dt_EdgeCaseRoute</TestCaseName>
   </TestSuite>
   <TestSuite name="TS_EdgeSpectrum">
      <TestCaseName name="tc_ClientFeedback">dt_EdgeCaseSpectrum</TestCaseName>
   </TestSuite>
</TestScenario>
`

;(async function () {
    const result = await transform(xml, {
        testSuites: [
            '/TestScenario/TestSuite',
            {
                name: '@name',
                testCases: ['TestCaseName', {
                    name: '@name',
                    data: '.'
                }]
            }
        ]
    })

    console.log(JSON.stringify(result, null, 2))
})()

output:

{
  "testSuites": [
    {
      "name": "TS_EdgeHome",
      "testCases": [
        {
          "name": "tc_Login",
          "data": "dt_EdgeCaseHome,dt_EdgeCaseRoute"
        },
        {
          "name": "tc_Logout",
          "data": "dt_EdgeCaseRoute"
        }
      ]
    },
    {
      "name": "TS_EdgePanel",
      "testCases": [
        {
          "name": "tc_AddContract",
          "data": "dt_EdgeCaseHome,dt_EdgeCaseSpectrum"
        }
      ]
    },
    {
      "name": "TS_EdgeRoute",
      "testCases": [
        {
          "name": "tc_VerifyContract",
          "data": "dt_EdgeCaseRoute"
        },
        {
          "name": "tc_Payment",
          "data": "dt_EdgeCaseRoute"
        }
      ]
    },
    {
      "name": "TS_EdgeSpectrum",
      "testCases": [
        {
          "name": "tc_ClientFeedback",
          "data": "dt_EdgeCaseSpectrum"
        }
      ]
    }
  ]
}
| improve this answer | |
1

Cruftless allows you to 'annotate' the data structure you want to match, to specify how it should be bound to a JSON representation of that same data.

So, if you define your template like this:

<TestScenario>
  <TestSuite name="{{name}}"><?bind suites|array?>
    <TestCaseName name="{{name}}">{{data}}</TestCaseName><?bind cases|array?>
  </TestSuite>
</TestScenario>

Then by calling .fromXML on the object created from it, passing in the XML you want to parse, you will get:

{
  suites: [
    { name: 'tc_Logout', data: 'dt_EdgeCaseRoute' },
    {
      name: 'tc_AddContract',
      data: 'dt_EdgeCaseHome,dt_EdgeCaseSpectrum'
    },
    { name: 'tc_Payment', data: 'dt_EdgeCaseRoute' },
    { name: 'tc_ClientFeedback', data: 'dt_EdgeCaseSpectrum' }
  ]
}
| improve this answer | |
0

if you have a XML file, then you can read that XML file using fs in nodejs and then you can use "xml2json" npm package.

    const parser = require('xml2json');
    const fs = require("fs")



    fs.readFile(uploadedFilePath, function(err,data){

        if(err) {
            return res.send({message:err});
        } else {

            jsonfile = JSON.parse(parser.toJson(data,{reversible: true}));

        }

    });
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.