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I'm working with a dataset that looks like this:

    | Host      | Risk           | Name      |
    | 10.1.1.1  | Critical       | ValueA    |
    | 10.1.1.1  | Critical       | ValueA    |
    | 10.1.1.1  | Critical       | ValueA    |
    | 10.1.1.1  | Critical       | ValueA    |
    | 10.1.1.1  | Critical       | ValueA    |
    | 10.1.1.1  | Critical       | ValueA    |
    | 10.1.1.1  | High           | ValueB    |
    | 10.1.1.1  | High           | ValueB    |
    | 10.1.1.1  | High           | ValueB    |
    | 10.1.1.1  | Critical       | ValueC    |
    | 10.1.1.1  | Critical       | ValueC    |
    | 10.1.1.1  | Critical       | ValueC    |
    | 10.1.1.1  | Critical       | ValueC    |

I'm trying to figure out a query that will produce a summary that looks like this:

    | Host      | Critical     | High      |
    | 10.1.1.1  | 2            | 1         |

Critical has a "2" underneath because there are only 2 DISTINCT values of the Name field ("ValueA" and "ValueC"). High has a "1" underneath because there is only 1 distinct Name value ("ValueB"). The tricky part for me is that I'm not trying to count the number of rows, but just the distinct values that match. In case you're wondering, the data is duplicated because there are other columns that contain unique values, but they're irrelevant to this query.

The closest I was able to get on my own is as follows, but that only produced the "Critical" column, and I can't figure out how to add the logic to get the "High" column:

    select Host, COUNT(DISTINCT Name) as Critical
    from [table]
    WHERE Risk = 'Critical'
    group by 1;

Any advice would be much appreciated. I tried a "COUNTIF" function, but kept getting the error "Unrecognized function countif," which seemed odd since "COUNTIF" is listed in the BigQuery documentation (https://cloud.google.com/bigquery/docs/reference/standard-sql/functions-and-operators#countif). Also tried to make CASE work, but didn't make a lot of progress.

Thanks!

5

Below is for BigQuery Standard SQL

#standardSQL
WITH `project.dataset.table` AS (
  SELECT '10.1.1.1' Host, 'Critical' Risk, 'ValueA' Name UNION ALL
  SELECT '10.1.1.1', 'Critical', 'ValueA' UNION ALL
  SELECT '10.1.1.1', 'Critical', 'ValueA' UNION ALL
  SELECT '10.1.1.1', 'Critical', 'ValueA' UNION ALL
  SELECT '10.1.1.1', 'Critical', 'ValueA' UNION ALL
  SELECT '10.1.1.1', 'Critical', 'ValueA' UNION ALL
  SELECT '10.1.1.1', 'High', 'ValueB' UNION ALL
  SELECT '10.1.1.1', 'High', 'ValueB' UNION ALL
  SELECT '10.1.1.1', 'High', 'ValueB' UNION ALL
  SELECT '10.1.1.1', 'Critical', 'ValueC' UNION ALL
  SELECT '10.1.1.1', 'Critical', 'ValueC' UNION ALL
  SELECT '10.1.1.1', 'Critical', 'ValueC' UNION ALL
  SELECT '10.1.1.1', 'Critical', 'ValueC' 
)
SELECT 
  Host, 
  COUNT(DISTINCT IF(Risk='Critical', Name, NULL)) Critical,
  COUNT(DISTINCT IF(Risk='High', Name, NULL)) High
FROM `project.dataset.table`
GROUP BY Host   

with result

Row Host        Critical    High     
1   10.1.1.1    2           1    
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  • 1
    Hi Mikhail, thanks for the response! Sorry, I should have mentioned one other thing -- there are hundreds of values in the "Name" column, so typing them all in manually won't really be feasible. Any suggests to get around this? – Josh Rogan Sep 11 '18 at 18:03
  • This solution does not require typing any values of the Name column – IceCreamToucan Sep 11 '18 at 18:24
  • that's right, there is no need in typing specific values of the Name column in this solution. check it again and ask if still confusion :o) – Mikhail Berlyant Sep 11 '18 at 18:45
  • Sorry! Misunderstood the WITH clause, thought that was part of the query. You're right, the query worked perfectly! Thanks for the help, very much appreciated. – Josh Rogan Sep 11 '18 at 19:42
  • no problem. glad you got it. consider accepting the answer then! :o) – Mikhail Berlyant Sep 11 '18 at 19:45

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