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Following this blog post, I'm trying to understand lstm for time series forecasting.

The thing is the result on the test data are too good, what am I missing?

Also everytime I re-run the fit it seems to get better, is the Net re-using the same weights?

The structure is very simple, the input_shape is [1, 1, 1].

Even with Epochs = 1, it learns all too well the test data.

Here's a reproducible example:

library(keras)
library(ggplot2)
library(dplyr)

Data creation and prep:

# create some fake time series
set.seed(123)

df_timeseries <- data.frame(
  ts = 1:2500,
  value = arima.sim(list(order = c(1,1,0), ar = 0.7), n = 2500)[-1] # fake data
)
#plot(df_timeseries$value, type = "l")

# first order difference
diff_serie <- diff(df_timeseries$value, differences = 1)

# Lagged data ---
lag_transform <- function(x, k= 1){

  lagged =  c(rep(NA, k), x[1:(length(x)-k)])
  DF = as.data.frame(cbind(lagged, x))
  colnames(DF) <- c( paste0('x-', k), 'x')
  DF[is.na(DF)] <- 0
  return(DF)
}
supervised <- lag_transform(diff_serie, 1) # "supervised" form
# head(supervised, 3)
#          x-1          x
# 1  0.0000000  0.1796152
# 2  0.1796152 -0.3470608
# 3 -0.3470608 -1.3107662

# Split Train/Test ---
N = nrow(supervised)
n = round(N *0.8, digits = 0)
train = supervised[1:n, ] # train set # 1999 obs
test  = supervised[(n+1):N,  ] # test set: 500 obs

# Normalize Data --- !!! used min/max just from the train set
scale_data = function(train, test, feature_range = c(0, 1)) {
  x = train
  fr_min = feature_range[1]
  fr_max = feature_range[2]
  std_train = ((x - min(x) ) / (max(x) - min(x)  ))
  std_test  = ((test - min(x) ) / (max(x) - min(x)  ))

  scaled_train = std_train *(fr_max -fr_min) + fr_min
  scaled_test = std_test *(fr_max -fr_min) + fr_min

  return( list(scaled_train = as.vector(scaled_train), scaled_test = as.vector(scaled_test) ,scaler= c(min =min(x), max = max(x))) )

}
Scaled = scale_data(train, test, c(-1, 1))

# Split --- 
y_train = Scaled$scaled_train[, 2]
x_train = Scaled$scaled_train[, 1]

y_test = Scaled$scaled_test[, 2]
x_test = Scaled$scaled_test[, 1]

# reverse function for scale back to original values
# reverse
invert_scaling = function(scaled, scaler, feature_range = c(0, 1)){
  min = scaler[1]
  max = scaler[2]
  t = length(scaled)
  mins = feature_range[1]
  maxs = feature_range[2]
  inverted_dfs = numeric(t)

  for( i in 1:t){
    X = (scaled[i]- mins)/(maxs - mins)
    rawValues = X *(max - min) + min
    inverted_dfs[i] <- rawValues
  }
  return(inverted_dfs)
}

Model and Fit:

# Model ---
# Reshape
dim(x_train) <- c(length(x_train), 1, 1)

# specify required arguments
X_shape2 = dim(x_train)[2]
X_shape3 = dim(x_train)[3]
batch_size = 1                # must be a common factor of both the train and test samples
units = 30                     # can adjust this, in model tuninig phase

model <- keras_model_sequential() 
model%>%                                             #[1, 1, 1]
  layer_lstm(units, batch_input_shape = c(batch_size, X_shape2, X_shape3), stateful= F)%>%
  layer_dense(units = 10) %>% 
  layer_dense(units = 1)

model %>% compile(
  loss = 'mean_squared_error',
  optimizer = optimizer_adam( lr= 0.02, decay = 1e-6 ),  
  metrics = c('mean_absolute_percentage_error')
)

# Fit --- 
Epochs = 1   
for(i in 1:Epochs ){
  model %>% fit(x_train, y_train, epochs=1, batch_size=batch_size, verbose=1, shuffle=F)
  model %>% reset_states()
}

# Predictions Test data ---
L = length(x_test)
scaler = Scaled$scaler
predictions = numeric(L)

for(i in 1:L){
  X = x_test[i]
  dim(X) = c(1,1,1) # praticamente prevedo punto a punto
  yhat = model %>% predict(X, batch_size=batch_size)
  # invert scaling
  yhat = invert_scaling(yhat, scaler,  c(-1, 1))
  # invert differencing
  yhat  = yhat + df_timeseries$value[(n+i)]          # could the problem be here?
  # store
  predictions[i] <- yhat
}

Plot for comparison just on the Test data:

enter image description here

Code for the plot and MAPE on Test data:

# Now for the comparison:
    df_plot = tibble(
      data = 1:nrow(test),
      actual = df_timeseries$value[(n+1):N],
      predict = predictions
    )

    df_plot %>% 
      gather("key", "value", -data) %>% 
      ggplot(aes(x = data, y = value, color = key)) +
      geom_line() +
      theme_minimal()

    # mape
    mape_function <- function(v_actual, v_pred) {
      diff <- (v_actual - v_pred)/v_actual
      sum(abs(diff))/length(diff)
    }
    mape_function(df_plot$actual, df_plot$predict)
    # [1] 0.00348043 - MAPE on test data

Update: based on nicola's comment:

By changing the prediction part, where I reverse the difference the plot does make more sense.

But still, how can I fix this? I need to plot the actual values not the differences. How can I measure my performance and if the net is overfitting?

predict_diff = numeric(L)
for(i in 1:L){
  X = x_test[i]
  dim(X) = c(1,1,1) # praticamente prevedo punto a punto
  yhat = model %>% predict(X, batch_size=batch_size)
  # invert scaling
  yhat = invert_scaling(yhat, scaler,  c(-1, 1))
  # invert differencing
  predict_diff[i] <- yhat
  yhat  = yhat + df_timeseries$value[(n+i)]          # could the problem be here?
  # store
  #predictions[i] <- yhat
}

df_plot = tibble(
  data = 1:nrow(test),
  actual = test$x,
  predict = predict_diff
)
df_plot %>% 
  gather("key", "value", -data) %>% 
  ggplot(aes(x = data, y = value, color = key)) +
  geom_line() +
  theme_minimal()

enter image description here

  • 2
    Yes, the problem is where you think it is. The point is that you are predicting the x_t - x_{t-1} and then plotting the predictions with the full x. Since x has a mean of orders of magnitude bigger than the mean of the differences, you won't notice anything in the plot. You should compare the predicted differences with the real ones. – nicola Sep 12 '18 at 10:46
  • but still, it is weird to be able to predict that much of the entire signal... The difference is super predicted if the estimation of the entire signal is that good. Any deviation on the difference would lead to strong deviation on the signal – denis Sep 12 '18 at 11:42
  • @denis No, it's not weird at all. Consider this baseline predictor: x_t = x_{t-1}, i.e. your guess it's just the previous value. Plot the actual values and the lagged one. You'll see what it seems a perfect match. "The difference is super predicted if the estimation of the entire signal is that good" is a false sentence. Again, you are dealing with quantities of different orders of magnitude. – nicola Sep 12 '18 at 11:49
  • Updated based on nicola's comment. It's still not clear to me why this is happening. I mean, I get the error, but how can you avoid it? Should I always measure the performance on the undifferenced data? – RLave Sep 12 '18 at 11:57
  • One thing I cant grasp is how would you get the first order difference for future data since you do not have the actual data? Is this model good only for prediction on already available data where you leak information from the test set? It is then usable only for single point prediction? In that case I would compare the single point prediction to some baseline model, like the naive model. – missuse Sep 12 '18 at 13:11

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