I have some code that generically resembles the following:

class ABC(Parent):
    def func1(self, **kwargs)
        start_time = time.time()
        ...
        ...
    return stuff

class XYZ(Parent):
    def func2(self, **kwargs)
        ...
        ...
        a = time.time() - start_time           
    return other_stuff

I'm looking for the absolute simplest way to use the variable start_time defined in func1 of class ABC inside of func2 within class XYZ.

Note: This code is very generic and the actual code I'm working with is much, much more complicated. Other answers I've found have mentioned defining start_time outside of either class and then passing them in, OR they involve changing arguments. I cannot do this. My start_time needs to be defined exactly here and nowhere else, and I cannot change my arguments for either func1 or func2.

Thanks for any assistance.

  • 1
    your arguments are **kwargs, you can pass anything. – juanpa.arrivillaga Sep 12 at 20:47
  • 1
    You have to pass the instance of ABC to the instance of XYZ. – Daniel Sep 12 at 20:51
  • @Daniel what is the syntax for this? I'm very new to Python. – AdamC Sep 12 at 20:56
  • 1
    If you cannot change anything, then you cannot solve your problem. Other answers seem to have very good suggestions. A variable is declared within a function if it is not needed outside. Otherwise it belongs elsewhere. – zvone Sep 12 at 21:33

It's difficult to solve your problem in a method that isn't going to be messy. Essentially, you will need to use a variable outside both of your functions. I think your best option is to use python's global keyword:

class ABC(Parent):
    def func1(self, **kwargs):
        global start_time
        start_time = time.time()

        return stuff

class XYZ(Parent):
    def func2(self, **kwargs):
        global start_time
        a = time.time() - start_time

        return other_stuff

The use of global here allows you to avoid defining your variable outside of your function.

  • Best to avoid polluting the global namespace with globals when you could simply pass around class instances and access start_time via ABC.start_time – jDo Sep 12 at 21:07
  • I agree, but the original question stated that there could be no arguments passed. – Kevin K. Sep 12 at 21:10
  • But no arguments need to be passed? Instance attributes will do. – jDo Sep 12 at 21:13
  • If you want to use instances of each class independently, you will need to pass arguments. By their statement: "My start_time needs to be defined exactly here and nowhere else, and I cannot change my arguments for either func1 or func2." It sounds like that is what they are looking for – Kevin K. Sep 12 at 21:16
  • Would you say I'm passing arguments in my answer? (none of the methods take any arguments except self) – jDo Sep 12 at 21:21

There are several ways of doing it. Here's one that avoids global by making start_time an instance variable/attribute of ABC and instantiating ABC within XYZ. I think this is also what the user @Daniel was hinting at in the comment "You have to pass the instance of ABC to the instance of XYZ".

import time


class Parent:
    pass


class ABC(Parent):
    def __init__(self):
        self.start_time = None

    def func1(self):
        self.start_time = time.time()


class XYZ(Parent):
    def __init__(self):
        self.abc = ABC()

    def func2(self):
        self.abc.func1()
        return time.time() - self.abc.start_time           


xyz = XYZ()
print(xyz.func2())

Python3.5 output:

>>> xyz = XYZ()
>>> print(xyz.func2())
9.5367431640625e-07

You can make start_time a class attribute in Parent.

class Parent(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.start_time = None

class ABC(Parent):
    def func1(self, **kwargs)
        self.start_time = time.time()
        ...
        ...
    return stuff

class XYZ(Parent):
    def func2(self, **kwargs)
        ...
        ...
        a = time.time() - self.start_time           
    return other_stuff
  • 1
    start_time is a independent variable each instance. – Daniel Sep 12 at 20:50

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