I've got a JSON file that contains the parameters/options for pandas' read_excel function. I'm having trouble passing them into that function call.

JSON file is structured similar to this:

{
    "io": "~/home/test.xlsx",
    "sheet_name": "Sheet1",
    "header": 0,
    "usecols": 2,
    "engine": "xlrd",
    "converters": {
            "col1": "np.float64",
            "col2": "np.float64"
    }
}

And I call it in my Python script like this:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import json
with open('json.json', 'r') as opened:

        options = json.loads(opened.read())

        import_pd_df = pd.read_excel(**options)

        print(import_pd_df)

When I have the options declared as a dictionary within the Python script and remove the double quotes that are around np.float64, the script works. But when I move the options to the JSON file, it fails while trying to parse the np.float64.

The error I get is: TypeError: 'str' object is not callable

Is there a way to properly format the JSON to be used as options in the function?

  • have you tried json.load() instead of loads()? – twegner Sep 12 at 21:49
  • Use "float64" instead of "np.float64" – Goyo Sep 12 at 22:37

np.float64 is a numpy dtype that is also a callable (which it must be a callable in order to be a converter from pandas perspective). "np.float64" is a string that cannot be called. You need to convert the string you've stored in the JSON file ("np.float64") into the callable desired (np.float64). You could do it like this:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import json

with open('json.json', 'r') as opened:
        options = json.loads(opened.read())
        for col, converter in options["converters"].items():
                exec('options["converters"]["{0}"] = {1}'.format(col, converter))
        import_pd_df = pd.read_excel(**options)
        print(import_pd_df)

If we step through with pdb, it's easy to verify the column converters get changed to a np.float64:

-> import_pd_df = pd.read_excel(**options)
(Pdb) l
  5     with open('json.json', 'r') as opened:
  6         options = json.loads(opened.read())
  7         for col, converter in options["converters"].items():
  8             exec('options["converters"]["{0}"] = {1}'.format(col, converter))
  9         import pdb; pdb.set_trace()
 10  ->     import_pd_df = pd.read_excel(**options)
 11         print(import_pd_df)
[EOF]
(Pdb) options["converters"]["col1"]
<class 'numpy.float64'>
(Pdb) options["converters"]["col2"]
<class 'numpy.float64'>

as desired.

Note: You might want to consider just storing your "options" file as a pickle file instead of JSON. That way you can just serialize Python functions and objects (like np.float64) to your "options" file. You won't have to do goofy string conversions. I can provide an example if desired, but there are plenty elsewhere.

Note2: This is not particularly secure. Be sure that you trust the party that is giving you that json.json file. You're open to some pretty serious injection attacks with the code above. pickle has similar issues: you'll have to trust the party that's giving you the file.

The problem is that you are trying to use a string value to represent a Python symbol.

Unfortunately, JSON can only represent number and strings, and knows nothing about symbolic values such as np.float64 so cannot parse them. Similarly, it would not work to call pd.read_excel with string values for those options (but it did work without the quotes, because you were then using the right values - functions, which Python can call).

You would therefore have to do some conversion after reading the JSON input before you obtained a dictionary you could pass to excel_read,

When reading JSON formatted data from an external file use json.load(file_path) like this:

import json with open(file_path, 'r') as j: obj = json.load(j)

  • This simply describes a different but equivalent way to read the JSON, but does not address the problem, which is the inability of the JSON parser to understand symbolic values. – holdenweb Sep 13 at 11:15

try this, read the .json not like string json.load(opened) . load is for a file, loads for a string...

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import json
with open('json.json') as opened:

        options = json.load(opened)

        import_pd_df = pd.read_excel(**options)

        print(import_pd_df)
  • This simply describes a different but equivalent way to read the JSON, but does not address the problem, which is the inability of the JSON parser to understand symbolic values. – holdenweb Sep 13 at 11:15

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