6

This question already has an answer here:

Consider the following simple program:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int a[5] = { a[2] = 1 };
    printf("%d %d %d %d %d\n", a[0], a[1],a[2], a[3], a[4]);
}

With GCC 7.3.0 this outputs

1 0 1 0 0

Considering that a[1] is zero, it seems that the initialization is similar to

int a[5] = { 1 };
a[2] = 1;

The question is: While initializers could be any generic expression, in which order is the initialization and assignments made?

Is this even valid and well-defined? Could it be implementation-defined, undefined or maybe unspecified?


This question is related to the question Confusion about Array initialization in C.

marked as duplicate by Community Sep 13 '18 at 8:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    Yeah it seems that this is VERY similar to the other question but just handles another aspect. I am not entirely sure if duplicate but a good answer to the other question could cover this topic. Interestingly this is voted much higher than the other question, which could be another indicator that upvotes are more likly given to high rep users. This is in no way a critic @OP, but I found this interesting. – Kami Kaze Sep 13 '18 at 7:06
  • 3
    Let's ask the real question! Why does int a[5] = { a[2] = 1, a[3] =2 }; gives us 1 2 0 0 0?! – hellow Sep 13 '18 at 7:09
  • 3
    I don't see how this is different to the other question. You basically answered the other question saying "I don't really know what's going on here" and posted another copy of the same question. Any actual useful answer to this question would answer the other one too, and vice versa – M.M Sep 13 '18 at 7:16
  • 1
    @hellow Now it gets nasty... I get 1 2 1 2 0 for your code with GCC 5.4.0. – Gerhardh Sep 13 '18 at 7:22
  • 1
    I've posted a language-lawyery answer to the other question. – melpomene Sep 13 '18 at 8:08
0

While I cannot state, that I am an ISO-expert, here is what I found out with the help of godbolt.

First I built the sample with the help of -fsanitize=undefined, which gives a good indication of undefined behavoir. Neither GCC nor clang were complaining.

Next I looked at the various stages gcc performs, in this case the gimple stage

foo ()
{
  int a[5];

  try
    {
      # DEBUG BEGIN_STMT
      a = {};
      a[2] = 1;
      _1 = a[2];
      a[0] = _1;
      # DEBUG BEGIN_STMT
      _2 = a[4];
      _3 = a[3];
      _4 = a[2];
      _5 = a[1];
      _6 = a[0];
      printf ("%d %d %d %d %d\n", _6, _5, _4, _3, _2);
    }
  finally
    {
      a = {CLOBBER};
    }
}

Here you can see, that first the array a is defined, then 1 is assigned to a[2], afterwards that result (1, because it is an assignment) is assigned to the first element of a. The other in indices are left to 0 and therefore the pattern 1 0 1 0 0 is printed out.

  • 4
    The question is what the standard says, not what a compiler does – M.M Sep 13 '18 at 7:17

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