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I have multiple windows. My LoginWindow has to validate the user. If this window is canceled the complete application should shutdown. If the user enter the correct login, the LoginWindow should be closed and the MainWindow open.

Flowchart

Question: My problem is at the yellow diamond: How to determine the state of the login process?

That is my current state.

public partial class App : Application
{
    [STAThread]
    public static void Main()
    {
        var app = new App();
        var login = new LoginWindow();
        if (app.Run(login) == 1) //<-- Problem: How to get the state from login?
        {
            var mainapp = new MainWindow();
            app.Run(mainapp);
        }
    }
}

I tried to get an exitcode from the loginwindow by using Application.Current.Shutdown(1); but it cause an InvalidOperationException on app.Run(mainapp);, because Shutdown closes the complete application.

11
  • 2
    Environment.Exit(1) ? This will terminate the application.
    – mm8
    Sep 13, 2018 at 12:58
  • Can the user exit the form in any other way than pressing the X button on the ControlBox of the form? Sep 13, 2018 at 12:59
  • 1
    Really, though, I don't think your application should be calling Run() multiple times - I think you should be using a different approach to show the login window, like calling ShowDialog() on it, then set a property on LoginWindow object based on the user's action, then examine the property when the login window is closed and ShowDialog() returns. Is there any reason you can't do something like that? I know that will work because I've tried it.
    – Ian
    Sep 14, 2018 at 10:13
  • 1
    @Ian Yeah, i've found the solution with ShowDialog. See my own answer. But can you explain (or give a link) what App.Run() does and why i should not call it twice?
    – Syrlia
    Sep 14, 2018 at 11:00
  • 1
    No, not really, it's just a feeling that it's the wrong thing to do :) See multiple calls of application run in wpf for the results of someone else's investigation for a similar question.
    – Ian
    Sep 14, 2018 at 11:32

4 Answers 4

4

Environment.Exit() terminates this process and gives the underlying operating system the specified exit code.

But a window has no "return value". You could handle the Closed event for the LoginWindow and check whether a property of thw window itself, or its view model, has been set. Please refer to the following example.

public class Program
{
    private static readonly App app = new App() { ShutdownMode = System.Windows.ShutdownMode.OnExplicitShutdown };

    [STAThread]
    public static void Main()
    {
        LoginWindow login = new LoginWindow();
        login.Closed += Login_Closed;
        app.Run(login);
    }

    private static void Login_Closed(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        LoginWindow loginWindow = (LoginWindow)sender;
        loginWindow.Closed -= Login_Closed;

        if (loginWindow.LoggedIn)
        {
            MainWindow mainWindow = new MainWindow();
            app.MainWindow = mainWindow;
            app.ShutdownMode = System.Windows.ShutdownMode.OnMainWindowClose;
            mainWindow.Show();
        }  
    }
}

public partial class LoginWindow : Window
{
    public LoginWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    public bool LoggedIn { get; private set; }

    private void Login_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        //if (authenticate)...
        LoggedIn = true;
        Close();
    }

    private void Cancel_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        LoggedIn = false;
        Close();
    }
}
0
1

I found a smart solution. A Window with return value is called "Dialog".


App.xaml.cs

    [STAThread]
    public static void Main()
    {
        var app = new App() { ShutdownMode = ShutdownMode.OnExplicitShutdown };
        if (new LoginWindow().ShowDialog() ?? false == true)
            app.Run(new MainWindow());
    }

LoginWindow.xaml.cs

private void OnLoginClick(object, EventArgs)
{
    this.DialogResult = true;
}

private void OnCancelClick(object, EventArgs)
{
    this.DialogResult = false;
}
1

To exit the whole application use "Application.exit();" and to open the main windows create object of that form then use "object.Show()" and "this .hide()" to hide the login form.

For example: Assume the query i.e. stored procedure like:

Create procedure dbo.usercheck
(
@userid nvarchar,
@password nvarchar 
)
As
Select username from login table

C# code:

SqlCommand com=new 
SqlCommand("dbo.usercheck","connection");

If(com.executescalar()==null)
{
Application.exit();
}
else
{
Mainform f=new Mainform();
f.show();
this.hide();
}

You can write the "Application.exit();" statement in cancel button's click event to close the application whenever you want to close whole application when clicked on cancel button of login form.

When user enters wrong user id or password then you can show the error message instead exit the application.

1
  • OP doesn't want to exit the whole application
    – Ian
    Sep 14, 2018 at 11:13
0

I would use the following code:

Declare a bool variable to check if user closed the app or if it was closed from your code:

bool userClosedForm = false;

Then inside the Close button add this line, after the code you already had there:

    private void btnClose_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        //your code
        userClosedForm = true;
    }

Add a Form_Closed event where you check the value of the variable:

    private void Form1_FormClosed(object sender, FormClosedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (userClosedForm == true) Application.Exit();
        else 
         {
          //your code to open the next form if the user logged in and you closed the form from code
         }
    }

Hope this helps ^^

3
  • As an aside, the == true in if (userClosedForm == true) is redundant code - userClosedForm already evaluates to true or false without the additional check, it's a bool.
    – Diado
    Sep 13, 2018 at 13:14
  • Yes, I recently moved from VB.NET, where it doesn't work like that, I'll have to get used to it. It doesn't affect the code though... Sep 13, 2018 at 13:17
  • Indeed, it doesn't affect the functionality, it's just redundant code :) I believe it's the same in VB too
    – Diado
    Sep 13, 2018 at 13:23

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