I want to be able to prove this statement map f (map g l) = map g (map f l) such that f (g x) = g (f x)

I need to proof this by base case and induction case. It is possible to do a proof by base case and induction case like the following:

     map f (map g l) = map g (map f l)

map f (map g l) = map g (map f l)   
   Base Case:    
 L.H.S   map f.(map g []) [ ]=            
          R.H.S  map g (map f []=[]           
        map f ( map g [ ])=                    
         map g [ ] = []                  
 map f [ ] = [ ]    
   Inductive Case:     L=(x:xs)  
   Inductive Hypotheses: ∀ (f.g)
  map f (map g (xs)) =
 map g (map f (xs)))   
   L.H.S   map f (map g (x:xs))=
              map f (g (x): map g (xs))= 
(f(g (x)): map f (map g (xs))
 (f(g x)) : ((map f) . (map g)) xs=        
        map f (map g (xs)) (using the Inductive Hypotheses)              
      map g (map f (xs)))                      R.H.S

But I think my prove is going wrong . Any suggestions ?

  • I think you dropped the (f (g x)) : ... towards the end – David Young Sep 13 at 21:27
  • 1
    You have this (f(g x)) : ((map f) . (map g)) xs = map f (map g (xs)), but then you don't have the (f (g x)) element anywhere in the list on the right, so that equality doesn't hold. – David Young Sep 13 at 21:34
  • 2
    I think your main hypothesis should be f(g x) = g(f x) for all xs -- if so, please edit your question adding the missing f – chi Sep 13 at 21:53
  • Your statement is false. Let g = show . length and f = reverse. Then g x = g (f x) for all lists x. Let l = [[0 .. 9]]. Now map f (map g l) = map f ["10"] = ["01"], but map g (map f l) = map g [[9, 8 .. 0]] = ["10"]. – melpomene Sep 13 at 22:28
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    @Hani : melpomene has disproved your statement by providing a counter-example. As chi notes, it seems likely there is a typo in your hypothesis. If we have f . g = g . f, then map (f . g) = map (g . f), and then, by the functor laws, map f . map g = map g . map f (and you would be able to reach the same conclusion through induction on the list shape). – duplode Sep 14 at 2:47
up vote 11 down vote accepted

The OP has indicated this is not an assignment.

Prove map f . map g == map g . map f provided f . g == g . f, where (f . g) x = f (g x) by definition.

The inductive data type definition:

data [a] = []                 -- [] is of type [a]
         | (:) a [a]          -- if x is of type a, and xs is of type [a],
                              --    then (x:xs) is of type [a]

Base case:

(map f . map g) [] = map f (map g [])    -- by definition of `.`
                   = map f []            -- by definition of map
                   = []                  -- by definition of map
                   = map g []            -- by definition of map
                   = map g (map f [])    -- by definition of map

whatever the f and g are. Base case is proven.

The Inductive case: under the Induction Hypothesis that it is true for a list xs of some length, prove it is true for a list (x:xs) with one more element in front of it:

(map f . map g) (x:xs) 
             = map f ( map g (x:xs) )          -- by definition of `.`
             = map f ( g x : map g xs )        -- by definition of map
             = f ( g x ) : map f ( map g xs )  -- by definition of map
             = g ( f x ) : map f ( map g xs )  -- by the condition on f,g
             = g ( f x ) : map g ( map f xs )  -- by the Induction Hypothesis
             = map g ( f x : map f xs )        -- by definition of map
             = map g ( map f (x:xs) )          -- by definition of map

Inductive case is proven.

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