237

I have a long text inside a div with defined width:

HTML:

<div>Stack Overflow is the BEST !!!</div>

CSS:

div {
    border: 1px solid black;
    width: 70px;
}

How could I force the string to stay in one line (i.e. to be cut in the middle of "Overflow") ?

I tried to use overflow: hidden, but it didn't help.

  • 10
    white-space: nowrap put this in your style tag. – Moshii Sep 29 '16 at 13:19

10 Answers 10

488

Try this:

div {
    border: 1px solid black;
    width: 70px;
    overflow: hidden;
    white-space: nowrap;
}
  • 2
    This made me a hero today :) Thank mate. – Pramesh Bajracharya Nov 3 '18 at 5:55
  • 16
    More than 7 years after I posted this, I am still making heroes..... :) – Bazzz Nov 17 '18 at 9:41
67

Use white-space:nowrap and overflow:hidden

http://jsfiddle.net/NXchy/8/

  • 29
    Add text-overflow:ellipsis; to above for better look. – tj-recess Jan 19 '16 at 22:50
  • can this be achieved with no css? – nilon Jul 24 '17 at 19:07
50

in your css use white-space:nowrap;

13

Your HTML code: <div>Stack Overflow is the BEST !!!</div>

CSS:

div {
    width: 100px;
    white-space:nowrap;
    overflow:hidden;
    text-overflow:ellipsis;
}

Now the result should be:

Stack Overf...
12

Everybody jumped on this one!!! I too made a fiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/audetwebdesign/kh4aR/

RobAgar gets a point for pointing out white-space:nowrap first.

Couple of things here, you need overflow: hidden if you don't want to see the extra characters poking out into your layout.

Also, as mentioned, you could use white-space: pre (see EnderMB) keeping in mind that pre will not collapse white space whereas white-space: nowrap will.

4

Give this a try. It uses pre rather than nowrap as I would assume you would want this to run similarly to <pre> but either will work just fine:

div {
    border: 1px solid black;
    max-width: 70px;
    white-space:pre;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/NXchy/11/

4

I jumped here looking for the very same thing, but none worked for me.

There are instances where regardless what you do, and depending on the system (Oracle Designer: Oracle 11g - PL/SQL), divs will always go to the next line, in which case you should use the span tag instead.

This worked wonders for me.

<span float: left; white-space: nowrap; overflow: hidden; onmouseover="rollOverImageSectionFiveThreeOne(this)">
    <input type="radio" id="radio4" name="p_verify_type" value="SomeValue"  />
</span> 
Just Your Text || 
<span id="headerFiveThreeOneHelpText" float: left; white-space: nowrap; overflow: hidden;></span>
  • Huge help on this, this was all that worked for me, probably spent 30 minutes on this, lol. Oddly, I'm not using any of what you mentioned, css, javascript, bootstrap, and some custom css. – edencorbin Dec 23 '15 at 15:39
3

add this to your div

white-space: nowrap;

http://jsfiddle.net/NXchy/1/

  • 1
    you can add: overflow: auto to display a horizontal scrollbar – Sarah West Mar 8 '11 at 12:21
1
div {
    display: flex;
    flex-direction: row; 
}

was the solution that worked for me. In some cases with div-lists this is needed.

some alternative direction values are row-reverse, column, column-reverse, unset, initial, inherit which do the things you expect them to do

0

Try setting a height so the block cannot grow to accommodate your text, and keep the overflow: hidden parameter

EDIT: Here is an example of what you might like if you need to display 2 lines high:

div {
    border: 1px solid black;
    width: 70px;
    height: 2.2em;
    overflow: hidden;
}
  • In your case the nowrap option is probably better, but I left my answer because I sometimes find myself needing a block that may have some lines wrapping until it overflows like this: jsfiddle.net/NXchy/7 (changed the link from Stephenmurdoch's version, thanks!) – Wouter Simons Mar 8 '11 at 12:22
  • No need for this, what happens if the user wants to bump up the text size using ctrl-+? Keeping the height flexible is better. – Marc Audet Mar 8 '11 at 12:47
  • If the user resizes the text with ctrl-+ is should just work: jsfiddle.net/kpKW3 – Wouter Simons Mar 8 '11 at 13:20
  • Using em's in the height keeps it flexible, key point well illustrated here in your example. – Marc Audet Mar 8 '11 at 14:06

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