4

I'm iterating through a cache of a hash of hashes of latitude keys that point to key/value pairs of longitudes/cities. I'm trying to find approximate matches for latitudes/longitudes that are close enough to what's already been looked up and is in the hash.

I'm doing it like this

    foreach my $lat_key ( keys $lookup_cache_latlonhash ) {

        if ( ($lat > ($lat_key - .5)) && ($lat < ($lat_key + .5)) ) {

            foreach my $lon_key ( keys %{ $lookup_cache_latlonhash->{$lat_key}} ) {

                if ( ($lon > ($lon_key - .5)) && ($lon < ($lon_key + .5)) ) {

                    $country = $$lookup_cache_latlonhash{$lat_key}{$lon_key};
                    print "Approx match found: $lat_key $lon_key $country\n";
                    return $country;
                }
            }
        }
    }

The code works to find these lat/lon pairs within the range. However for each latitude it loops through using, when it does find it's in range (the first nested condition), it's adding it to the hash (presumably keys %{ $goog_lookup_cache_latlonhash->{$lat_key}}) which is not intended, adding useless/empty keys to the hash:

$VAR1 = {
      '37.59' => {},
      '37.84' => {},
      '37.86' => {},
      '37.42' => {
                   '126.44' => 'South Korea/Jung-gu'
                 },
      '37.92' => {},
      '37.81' => {},
      '38.06' => {
                   '-122.53' => 'America/Novato'
                 },
      '37.8' => {},
      '37.99' => {},
      '37.61' => {},
       ...

What's the clever, or at least sane, way to do this lookup? So I'm not unintentionally adding keys to the hash just by looking them up?

  • 1
    Note that allowing keys to work on a reference was decided to be a bad idea, and was removed from Perl v5.24. So keys $lookup_cache_latlonhash should be written as keys %$lookup_cache_latlonhash. – Borodin Sep 15 '18 at 1:38
9

What you're experiencing is auto-vivification. It's a feature of Perl to make working with nested structures a little easier.

Any time an undefined value is dereferenced, perl will automatically create the object you're accessing.

use Data::Dumper; 
my $hash = {}; if ($hash->{'a'}) {} #No auto-vivification because you're just checking the value   
keys %{$hash->{'b'}}; #auto-vivification because you're acting on the value (getting the keys of it) $hash->{b} 
print Dumper($hash);

There are a couple of ways to avoid this -

  1. Add no autovivification in the scope you want to avoid this functionality
  2. Check to see if they item you're accessing is defined or exists (and is of the type you need)

I recommend the second one because it helps build the habit of checking your code for correct data structuring and makes debugging much easier.

foreach my $lat_key (keys $lookup_cache_latlonhash) {
    if (($lat > ($lat_key - .5)) 
        && ($lat < ($lat_key + .5)) 
        && ref($lookup_cache_latlonhash->{$lat_key}) eq 'HASH')  #expecting a hash here - undefined or any non-hash value will skip the foreach
    {
        foreach my $lon_key (keys %{ $lookup_cache_latlonhash->{$lat_key}}) {
            if (($lon > ($lon_key - .5)) && ($lon < ($lon_key + .5))) {
                $country = $$lookup_cache_latlonhash{$lat_key}{$lon_key};
                print "Approx match found: $lat_key $lon_key $country\n";
                return $country;
            }
        }
    }
}
  • Makes perfect sense and the sandwiched if between each foreach is clear - thorough answer. I'm wondering why no autovivification isn't invoked with use strict - it feels like it should be, no? – ikebukuru Sep 14 '18 at 6:56
  • 2
    @ikebukuru - In my experience, autovivification is the desired behavior (or at least not-undesired) well over 90% of the time. It does surprise a lot of people the first time they encounter it, but it's extremely rare for it to do any harm beyond that. – Dave Sherohman Sep 14 '18 at 7:37
  • I'm unclear why you think keys %{ $lookup_cache_latlonhash->{$lat_key} } will autovivify an element when this is inside a loop for my $lat_key ( keys $lookup_cache_latlonhash ) so the element must already exist. – Borodin Sep 14 '18 at 10:59
  • @Borodin indeed! That's why it had me scratching my head. Thanks for cleaning up my question's code for readability. – ikebukuru Sep 14 '18 at 22:58
  • @ikebukuru: The only way I can see this happening with your own code is if you have the elements already existing but with a value of undef, which will also be autovivified. Is that possible? If not then the problem must exist elsewhere in your code. Check the hash both before and after the outer for loop. – Borodin Sep 14 '18 at 23:59
2

Put

no autovivification;

in scope.

2

You can use the exists keyword for this.

Solution

use Data::Dumper;
$hash = {};
$hash{'alpha'} = 'yep';
$hash{'beta'} = 'this too';
if (exists $hash{'gamma'}) {
    print "Found gamma."
}
print Dumper(\%hash);
$hash{'gamma'} = 'added';
if (exists $hash{'gamma'}) {
    print "Gamma was updated.\n"
}
print Dumper(\%hash);

Example Output

$VAR1 = {
          'beta' => 'this too',
          'alpha' => 'yep'
        };
Gamma was updated.
$VAR1 = {
          'gamma' => 'added',
          'beta' => 'this too',
          'alpha' => 'yep'
        };
  • This is completely unrelated to the code in the question. – Borodin Sep 14 '18 at 13:09

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